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I've used HashSet and Dictionary a lot in C#, and found them very fast...

I've tried using std::map and std::hash_map and am finding them very slow in comparision. Does this sound like expected behaviour? Is there something I might be doing wrong in my use of std::hash_map?

Or, is there a better C++ Hash container out there?

I'm hashing int32s, usually around 100,000 of them.

Update: I created a repro in C# and C++. It runs two trials, they take 19ms and 13ms in C#, and about 11,000ms in C++. There must be something really wrong with my C++ code :)

(Both were run as Release builds, both are Console apps)

C# Output:

Found 511 values in the intersection, in 19 ms
Found 508 values in the intersection, in 13 ms

C++ Output:

Found 308 values in the intersection, in 11764.7ms
Found 316 values in the intersection, in 11742.8ms

C++ Output (using stdext::hash_map instead of std::map)

Found 300 values in the intersection, in 383.552ms
Found 306 values in the intersection, in 2277.02ms

C++ Output (using stdext::hash_map, a release x64 build)

Found 292 values in the intersection, in 1037.67ms
Found 302 values in the intersection, in 3663.71ms

Notes:

  • Set2 is not getting populated quite as I wanted in C++, I was expecting it to have a 50% intersection with Set1 (as it does in C#), but I had to multiply my random number by 10 for some reason to even get them to partially not intersect

C#:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int start = DateTime.Now.Millisecond;
        int intersectionSize = runIntersectionTest();
        int duration = DateTime.Now.Millisecond - start;

        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Found {0} values in the intersection, in {1} ms", intersectionSize, duration));

        start = DateTime.Now.Millisecond;
        intersectionSize = runIntersectionTest();
        duration = DateTime.Now.Millisecond - start;

        Console.WriteLine(String.Format("Found {0} values in the intersection, in {1} ms", intersectionSize, duration));

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

    static int runIntersectionTest()
    {
        Random random = new Random(DateTime.Now.Millisecond);

        Dictionary<int,int> theMap = new Dictionary<int,int>();

        List<int> set1 = new List<int>();
        List<int> set2 = new List<int>();

        // Create 100,000 values for set1
        for ( int i = 0; i < 100000; i++ )
        {
	        int value = 1000000000 + i;
	        set1.Add(value);
        }

        // Create 1,000 values for set2
        for ( int i = 0; i < 1000; i++ )
        {
	        int value = 1000000000 + (random.Next() % 200000 + 1);
	        set2.Add(value);
        }

        // Now intersect the two sets by populating the map
        foreach( int value in set1 )
        {
	        theMap[value] = 1;
        }

        int intersectionSize = 0;

        foreach ( int value in set2 )
        {
            int count;
            if ( theMap.TryGetValue(value, out count ) )
            {
                intersectionSize++;
                theMap[value] = 2;
            }
        }

        return intersectionSize;
    }

C++:

int runIntersectionTest()
{
    std::map<int,int> theMap;

    vector<int> set1;
    vector<int> set2;

    // Create 100,000 values for set1
    for ( int i = 0; i < 100000; i++ )
    {
    	int value = 1000000000 + i;
    	set1.push_back(value);
    }

    // Create 1,000 values for set2
    for ( int i = 0; i < 1000; i++ )
    {
    	int random = rand() % 200000 + 1;
    	random *= 10;

    	int value = 1000000000 + random;
    	set2.push_back(value);
    }

    // Now intersect the two sets by populating the map
    for ( vector<int>::iterator iterator = set1.begin(); iterator != set1.end(); iterator++ )
    {
    	int value = *iterator;

    	theMap[value] = 1;
    }

    int intersectionSize = 0;

    for ( vector<int>::iterator iterator = set2.begin(); iterator != set2.end(); iterator++ )
    {
    	int value = *iterator;

    	map<int,int>::iterator foundValue = theMap.find(value);

    	if ( foundValue != theMap.end() )
    	{
    		theMap[value] = 2;

    		intersectionSize++;
    	}
    }

    return intersectionSize;

}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    srand ( time(NULL) );

    Timer timer;
    int intersectionSize = runIntersectionTest();
    timer.Stop();

    cout << "Found " << intersectionSize << " values in the intersection, in " << timer.GetMilliseconds() << "ms" << endl;

    timer.Reset();
    intersectionSize = runIntersectionTest();
    timer.Stop();

    cout << "Found " << intersectionSize << " values in the intersection, in " << timer.GetMilliseconds() << "ms" << endl;

    getchar();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Could you provide some benchmarks? –  Todd Gardner Jun 29 '09 at 2:49
    
What takes maybe 10ms in C# seems to take 1,000ms in C++. I'll try to do a more controlled comparison tomorrow, maybe post code for each C# and C++. –  Alex Black Jun 29 '09 at 2:52
    
I posted some benchmarks. –  Alex Black Jun 29 '09 at 13:40
    
@Alex: Though I'm not familiar enough with Visual Studio's internals to be specific, it sounds like the problem is in the instrumentation that the debugger is adding, rather than in the code generated by the compiler. A factor of 100 slowdown is certainly a bug; report it! –  David Seiler Jun 30 '09 at 2:32
    
@David: Thanks for chiming in. We managed to get to the bottom of this, see: stackoverflow.com/questions/1060337/…. What happens is when you attach the debugger a different (DEBUG) memory heap is used - you can turn it off if you want. –  Alex Black Jun 30 '09 at 2:40

6 Answers 6

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Hash_map and hash_set are non-standard, unordered_map and unordered_set are the most likely soon to be standard versions. Without having a reproducer, I don't think this is going to get far though. Under the hood, they are the same data structures, so they should have similar performance.


I compiled the provided sample under MS Visual Studio 2008 v9.0.30729.1, as Visual C++ -> Win32 -> Console Application (though I rolled my own Timer class because I wasn't sure what you were using). Under debug, I got times of 1000 ms, but compiling under release was 50 ms.

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
#include <map>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <time.h>

#include <windows.h>

typedef struct {
    LARGE_INTEGER start;
    LARGE_INTEGER stop;
} stopWatch;

class CStopWatch {

private:
    stopWatch timer;
    LARGE_INTEGER frequency;
    double LIToSecs( LARGE_INTEGER & L);
public:
    CStopWatch();
    void startTimer( );
    void stopTimer( );
    double getElapsedTime();
};

double CStopWatch::LIToSecs( LARGE_INTEGER & L) {
    return ((double)L.QuadPart /(double)frequency.QuadPart) ;
}

CStopWatch::CStopWatch(){
    timer.start.QuadPart=0;
    timer.stop.QuadPart=0;
    QueryPerformanceFrequency( &frequency ) ;
}

void CStopWatch::startTimer( ) {
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&timer.start) ;
}

void CStopWatch::stopTimer( ) {
    QueryPerformanceCounter(&timer.stop) ;
}

double CStopWatch::getElapsedTime() {
    LARGE_INTEGER time;
    time.QuadPart = timer.stop.QuadPart - timer.start.QuadPart;
    return LIToSecs( time) ;
}

using namespace std;
int runIntersectionTest()
{
    std::map<int,int> theMap;

    vector<int> set1;
    vector<int> set2;

    // Create 100,000 values for set1
    for ( int i = 0; i < 100000; i++ )
    {
        int value = 1000000000 + i;
        set1.push_back(value);
    }

    // Create 1,000 values for set2
    for ( int i = 0; i < 1000; i++ )
    {
        int random = rand() % 200000 + 1;
        random *= 10;

        int value = 1000000000 + random;
        set2.push_back(value);
    }

    // Now intersect the two sets by populating the map
    for ( vector<int>::iterator iterator = set1.begin(); iterator != set1.end(); iterator++ )
    {
        int value = *iterator;

        theMap[value] = 1;
    }

    int intersectionSize = 0;

    for ( vector<int>::iterator iterator = set2.begin(); iterator != set2.end(); iterator++ )
    {
        int value = *iterator;

        map<int,int>::iterator foundValue = theMap.find(value);

        if ( foundValue != theMap.end() )
        {
                theMap[value] = 2;

                intersectionSize++;
        }
    }

    return intersectionSize;

}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    srand ( time(NULL) );
    int tests = 2;
    while(tests--){
      CStopWatch timer;
      timer.startTimer();
      int intersectionSize = runIntersectionTest();
      timer.stopTimer();

      cout << "Found " << intersectionSize << " values in the intersection, in " << timer.getElapsedTime() << "s\r\n";
    }

    getchar();

    return 0;
}

(I would try with unordered_map but my version doesn't have it). I suspect there is some problem in your setup for C++.

share|improve this answer
    
Note: boost offers implementation of both. –  GManNickG Jun 29 '09 at 5:45
1  
I figured something out: if I attach the debugger to either RELEASE or DEBUG builds (e.g. hit F5 in the IDE), then I get horrible times. –  Alex Black Jun 29 '09 at 20:24

It doesn't sound expected, but you'll need to gather some more details before we can really help. Whose hash_map implementation are you using? Did you point a profiler at it, and if so what did it tell you?

In general, if a hash table implementation is performing poorly for no obvious reason, usually it's because the hash function that the table is using happens to perform badly for your particular input. That might be your problem - the C++ hash_map happens to use a hash function that maps your keys to a small range of buckets, and the C# HashSet does not - or it might be something entirely different.

std::map is generally implemented as a tree, and so will have different performance characteristics. Again, the details of the implementation and input data matter.

share|improve this answer
    
When I used hash_map I believe I was using Microsoft's... I just fired up VS 2008 and typed #include <hash_map>. Any tips on a good hash function with hash_map for Int32 numbers? I'll do some googling. –  Alex Black Jun 29 '09 at 2:54
    
The VC++ team is pretty sharp about that sort of thing IME, which makes me think it's less likely to be a hash function issue. I'll look at the problem in more depth after you've posted the sample code tomorrow. –  David Seiler Jun 29 '09 at 3:00
    
sample code posted. –  Alex Black Jun 29 '09 at 13:39

I never used it but Google Sparcehash may be a good fit

share|improve this answer

You're using std::map in your C++ code, which has insertion and lookup times of O(log(n)). Try testing with hash_map to get a better comparison.

share|improve this answer
    
I switched std::map for stdext::hash_map, and got WAY better results, but still terrible compared to C#. Found 300 values in the intersection, in 383.552ms Found 306 values in the intersection, in 2277.02ms –  Alex Black Jun 29 '09 at 13:46

We managed to get to the bottom of this, see:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1060337/why-does-my-stl-code-run-so-slowly-when-i-have-the-debugger-ide-attached

What happens is when you attach the debugger a different (DEBUG) memory heap is used - you can turn it off if you want.

share|improve this answer

What you are really comparing is

C# hash set which is O(1), meaning almost constant and independent of input size,

versus C++ vector.... meaning (size of input) times constant...

This makes little practical sense.

You should try using the equivalent of hashset in C++ which is (after tr1 in 2007 i think) std::tr1::unordered_set<...> (and std::tr1::unordered_set<...>)

wikipedia link on TR1

Also note that according to this page Visual Studio has their own suboptimal stl tr1 implementation. (have no personal experience, found it here)

share|improve this answer

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