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There are two different ideas about the element which plays role of default command target in the "WPF Control Development" book:

Page 258» A command target is the object on which the command is raised. ICommandSource interface contains a CommandTarget property that can be set to a specific object. By default, the command source itself is considered the command target.

Page 262» By default, when the CommandTarget is not set, the element with the keyboard focus is used.

Furthermore, at this tutorial, we can leave menu items and buttons command target undefined while menu items only (i.e. and not buttons) can detect command target truly. So what's the default command target?!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think I just understood what this means:

If an element is focusable, it cannot detect undefined routed command target automatically.

If an element is focusable, it means that it will always have keyboard focus when it is activated in order to raise a command. Thus, if it has a CommandBinding for the Command, it will always handle it itself, and if it hasn't it will always be disabled.

However, you can get around this by setting FocusManager.IsFocusScope to true on the control's container, like in this XAML:

<Window x:Class="MainWindow"
    xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml/presentation"
    xmlns:x="http://schemas.microsoft.com/winfx/2006/xaml"
    xmlns:my="clr-namespace:CommandRouting"
    Title="MainWindow" Height="350" Width="525">
    <Grid>
        <Grid.RowDefinitions>
            <RowDefinition Height="auto"/>
            <RowDefinition/>
            <RowDefinition/>
            <RowDefinition/>
        </Grid.RowDefinitions>
        <Menu IsMainMenu="True">
            <MenuItem x:Name="TestMenuItem" Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}"/>
        </Menu>
        <GroupBox x:Name="CommandBindingOnControlsGroupBox" Header="CommandBinding on Controls" Grid.Row="1">
            <StackPanel>
            <Button x:Name="CommandBindingOnButtonButton" Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}" Content="CommandBinding on Button">
               <Button.CommandBindings>
                    <CommandBinding Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}" Executed="CommandBinding_Executed" PreviewExecuted="CommandBinding_Executed"/>
                </Button.CommandBindings>
            </Button>
                <TextBox x:Name="CommandBindingOnTextBoxTextBox">
                    <TextBox.CommandBindings>
                        <CommandBinding Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}" Executed="CommandBinding_Executed"/>
                    </TextBox.CommandBindings>
                    <TextBox.InputBindings>
                        <!-- provide alternate keyboard shortcut -->
                        <KeyBinding Key="{x:Static Key.P}" Modifiers="{x:Static ModifierKeys.Control}" Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}"/>
                    </TextBox.InputBindings>
                </TextBox>
                <Button x:Name="CommandTargetOnButtonButton" Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}" Content="CommandTarget on Button" CommandTarget="{Binding ElementName=CommandBindingOnControlsGroupBox}">
                    <Button.CommandBindings>
                        <CommandBinding Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}" Executed="CommandBinding_Executed"/>
                    </Button.CommandBindings>
                </Button>
            </StackPanel>
        </GroupBox>
        <GroupBox x:Name="CommandBindingOnContainerGroupBox" Header="CommandBinding on Container" Grid.Row="2">
            <GroupBox.CommandBindings>
                <CommandBinding Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}" PreviewExecuted="CommandBinding_Executed"/>
            </GroupBox.CommandBindings>
            <StackPanel x:Name="CommandBindingOnInnerContainerStackPanel">
                <StackPanel.CommandBindings>
                    <CommandBinding Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}" Executed="CommandBinding_Executed"/>
                </StackPanel.CommandBindings>
                <Button x:Name="CommandBindingOnContainerButton" Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}" Content="CommandBinding on Two Containers">
                </Button>
                <TextBox x:Name="CommandBindingOnContainerTextBox">
                    <TextBox.InputBindings>
                        <!-- provide alternate keyboard shortcut -->
                        <KeyBinding Key="{x:Static Key.P}" Modifiers="{x:Static ModifierKeys.Control}" Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}"/>
                    </TextBox.InputBindings>
                </TextBox>
            </StackPanel>
        </GroupBox>
        <GroupBox x:Name="OtherFocusScopeGroupBox" FocusManager.IsFocusScope="True" Header="Other FocusScope, No CommandBindings" Grid.Row="3">
            <StackPanel >
                <Button x:Name="OtherFocusScopeButton" Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}" Content="Other FocusScope">
                </Button>
                <TextBox x:Name="OtherFocusScopeTextBox">
                    <TextBox.CommandBindings>
                        <CommandBinding Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}" Executed="CommandBinding_Executed"/>
                    </TextBox.CommandBindings>
                    <TextBox.InputBindings>
                        <!-- provide alternate keyboard shortcut -->
                        <KeyBinding Key="{x:Static Key.P}" Modifiers="{x:Static ModifierKeys.Control}" Command="{x:Static my:MainWindow.TestCommand}"/>
                    </TextBox.InputBindings>
                </TextBox>
            </StackPanel>
        </GroupBox>
    </Grid>
</Window>
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+1 Thanks- As I mentioned, in case of Unspecified CommandTarget, the focused element will be considered as the CommandTarget and the mechanism will start travelling from it up to find nearest command binder. Consequently, I think it's better to say: Thus, if it has a CommandBinding for the Command, it'll raise the Executed routed event (as its e.sender) and therefore it will always handle it itself, and if it hasn't, the mechanism will continue searching until it reaches the root. So it can be enable if another command binder is found on this path. Agree with me? –  Mimi May 13 '12 at 13:40
    
Yes, that's technically more complete. However, the point here is that a focusable control will always be its own CommandTarget, since it will always pull the keyboard focus to itself, while the idea of not specifying the CommandTarget is that the command can be handled by whatever element is currently focused. As I already said, one can get around this limitation by setting FocusManager.IsFocusScope. One should probably make a difference between CommandTarget, the element that raises the Executed RoutedEvent, and CommandHandler, the element with the CommandBinding that handles the event. –  hbarck May 13 '12 at 13:48

Based on some more different test cases and with respect to @dowhilefor and @hbarck's answers, I concluded that there is a specific traveling path for each case.

Specified CommandTarget: It starts from CommandTarget toward the root element of visual tree to find first (nearest) element which has bound the command. (It looks for this element only on this path.) Conclusion:

  1. sender: The CommandTarget container element which has bound the command (with CommandBinding).
  2. e.source: The element which was specified as CommandTarget.

Unspecified CommandTarget: It starts from the element which got focused (at CommandSource scope) toward the root element of visual tree to find first (nearest) element which has bound the command. At this condition, focused element will be determined as CommandTarget. Conclusion:

  1. sender: The container of focused element which has bound the command (with CommandBinding tag).
  2. e.Source: The focused element.
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Yes, I think you got it here. Actually, the element that initiates the command (the Button or MenuItem, which is called the Command source in the WPF docs) is completely out of the picture, here I was wrong in my initial answer, therefore I'm going to change or delete it... –  hbarck May 13 '12 at 11:18
    
Thanks @hbarck. Your answer was helpful. –  Mimi May 13 '12 at 12:12

Out of context i don't understand what the first highlighted sentence means, but i think its wrong. The second sentence on the other hand is right

Msdn:

If the command target is not defined, the element with keyboard focus will be used as the command target.

This is useful if you want commands to operate on something, like a paste command on the currently focused textbox. You want the paste command to always work, no matter which textbox or maybe which other control has the focus, and this make this possible. Its worth pointing out that in regards of Menus there is another concept to remember which is called FocusScope. Commanding in WPF can be tricky sometimes, consider a save button that doesn't take the focus of a textbox, therefore not refreshing the Text property (because it only updates the target binding on focuslost). But remember, CommandTarget only works on RoutedCommands, not on "simple" ICommands.

Regarding your tutorial video, haven't seen it: This concept works for all CommandSources that doesn't take the Keyboard Focus itself.

So to conclude: CommandTarget is, as long as the Command is a RoutedCommand, the current keyboard focused element otherwise it is ignored.

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+1 Thanks @dowhilefor. I doubt whether understand it; If an element is focusable, it cannot detect undefined routed command target automatically. Is this correct? –  Mimi May 12 '12 at 13:41
    
@Mimi honestly i don't understand it either. A focusable control has nothing to do with commands and doesn't care about command target. A Command Target is simply the control where the routing starts upwards to the window until it finds a CommandBinding that handles the actual command logic. –  dowhilefor May 12 '12 at 13:51

One point seems to be missing here: a CommandTarget for a given Command can only be an object which defines a CommandBinding for that command.

Edit: clarified and corrected the following paragraphs, in order not to leave misleading information in the system.

Command routing is a special case of event routing, i.e. events moving up and down the logical tree: Controls which implement the ICommandSource interface, like InputBindings, Buttons or MenuItems, are CommandSources. If they raise a command, this causes a RoutedEvent to start at the CommandTarget. This is normally the element that has keyboard focus. The event travels up the logical tree until it reaches the root. All elements with CommandBindings for the command along this way get a chance to handle the command, although normally the first element that handles the command wins and stops the routing process. This might even be the CommandSource itself, if it has a CommandBinding for the command, and that is probably what your first quotation is about. If an element handles the event, the sender parameter will be the element which defines the CommandBinding, while the Source property of the event's RoutedEventArgs will be the element where the event startet routing, i.e. the CommandTarget.

To make the confusion complete, the ICommandSource interface defines a property called CommandTarget. This property is for cases where you want to short-circuit command routing, and want a special control to handle the command, no matter where the keyboard focus is. In this case, you would write something like CommandTarget="{Binding ElementName=MyCommandTargetControl}" on the Button or MenuItem in question. Again, you have to make sure that this control has a CommandBinding for the Command, otherwise the Command will be permanently disabled.

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I'm not sure if i understand your first sentence correctly. But a command target can be anything, not something that has a commandbinding on that particular command. The paste command for example, lets say the window has a CommandBinding on that, now a button gets the paste command and the target was set to this one specific textbox. This works fine, without the textbox having a commandbinding for paste. –  dowhilefor May 12 '12 at 15:49
    
In case of specifying CommandTarget explicitly, I found it out that the nearest element to the CommandTarget (between it an the root of visual tree) which has CommandBinding executes the command. Here e.Source will be the target element and the unique way to determine real invoker source is to use CommandParameter as self-relating binding source. (via e.Parameter). On the other hand, in case of unknown CommandTarget, the command mechanism starts traveling from the command source (which sets the Command property) up to the root and doesn't travel back again towards focused element –  Mimi May 12 '12 at 16:31
    
@dowhilefor: TextBoxes have class commandbindings (see CommandManager.RegisterClassCommandBinding for details) for a lot of editing commands. That's why they can handle things like copy and paste without having explicit CommandBindings. In order to test command routing, I would use a custom RoutedCommand, so that I'm sure that no built-in behaviour gets in my way... –  hbarck May 12 '12 at 16:48
    
@mimi: are you sure that it doesn't travel back? If you use a Button as CommandSource, that Button has KeyBoard focus when you press it, so the route up and the route down are actually the same. You can only test this if the control that raises the Command (CommandSource) and the control that receives it (CommandTarget) are in different FocusScopes, e.g. like MenuItems (Menu is a new FocusScope by default). –  hbarck May 12 '12 at 16:52
    
@mimi again: By the way, the sender parameter of the Executed-Eventhandler will be the CommandTarget, no need to bind anything to CommandParameter here. –  hbarck May 12 '12 at 16:54

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