Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a daterange (from, to) that i want loop through an different intervals (daily, weekly, monthly, ...)

How can i loop through this dateranges?

Update

Thanks for your answers, i came up with the following:

interval = 'week' # month, year
start = from
while start < to
  stop  = start.send("end_of_#{interval}")
  if stop > to
    stop = to
  end
  logger.debug "Interval from #{start.inspect} to #{stop.inspect}"
  start = stop.send("beginning_of_#{interval}")
  start += 1.send(interval)
end

This will loop through a date range with intervals week, month or year and respects the beginning and end of the given interval.

Since i did not mention this in my question i choosed the answer that pushed me into the right direction.

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Loop until the from date plus 1.day, 1.week, or 1.month is greater than the to date?

 > from = Time.now
 => 2012-05-12 09:21:24 -0400 
 > to = Time.now + 1.month + 2.week + 3.day
 => 2012-06-29 09:21:34 -0400 
 > tmp = from
 => 2012-05-12 09:21:24 -0400 
 > begin
?>   tmp += 1.week
?>   puts tmp
?> end while tmp <= to
2012-05-19 09:21:24 -0400
2012-05-26 09:21:24 -0400
2012-06-02 09:21:24 -0400
2012-06-09 09:21:24 -0400
2012-06-16 09:21:24 -0400
2012-06-23 09:21:24 -0400
2012-06-30 09:21:24 -0400
 => nil 
share|improve this answer
    
[link]stackoverflow.com/questions/501253/… Xenofex answer more friendly in use –  Sector May 12 '12 at 13:54
    
@Sector That's the same thing, wrapped in a method. –  Dave Newton May 12 '12 at 14:06
    
if meet the end of month like 2014-06-30 , it is unable to plus day to July 1st , is there any solution? –  peterlawn Jul 4 at 1:25

In Ruby 1.9, I added my own method on Range for stepping through time ranges:

class Range
  def time_step(step, &block)
    return enum_for(:time_step, step) unless block_given?

    start_time, end_time = first, last
    begin
      yield(start_time)
    end while (start_time += step) <= end_time
  end
end

Then, you can call this like, e.g. (My example uses a Rails specific method: 15.minutes):

irb(main):001:0> (1.hour.ago..Time.current).time_step(15.minutes) { |time| puts time }
2012-07-01 21:07:48 -0400
2012-07-01 21:22:48 -0400
2012-07-01 21:37:48 -0400
2012-07-01 21:52:48 -0400
2012-07-01 22:07:48 -0400
=> nil

irb(main):002:0> (1.hour.ago..Time.current).time_step(15.minutes).map { |time| time.to_s(:short) }
=> ["01 Jul 21:10", "01 Jul 21:25", "01 Jul 21:40", "01 Jul 21:55", "01 Jul 22:10"]

Notice that this method uses the Ruby 1.9 convention where enumeration methods return an enumerator if no block is given, which allows you to string enumerators together.

share|improve this answer
1  
Nice, I should've found this answer sooner it would've saved me time! Wrote a very similar implementation for adding ActiveSupport::Durations to Range#step stackoverflow.com/questions/19093487/ruby-create-range-of-dates/… –  CaptainPete Oct 17 '13 at 3:49

The succ method is deprecated in 1.9 range. Wanting to do the same thing by week, I came to this solution :

  def by_week(start_date, number_of_weeks)
    number_of_weeks.times.inject([]) { |memo, w| memo << start_date + w.weeks }
  end

This return an array of week in the interval. Easily adaptable for months.

share|improve this answer

You have the step method on the Range object. http://ruby-doc.org/core-1.9.3/Range.html#method-i-step

share|improve this answer
    
Can you provide an example? You can't iterate from time, so it's not just a matter of stepping via 1.week etc. –  Dave Newton May 12 '12 at 13:27
    
You can do some basic stuff here: (Date.current - 5.months .. Date.current).step(7){#code}, (Date.current - 5.months .. Date.current).step(1){#code} –  bcd May 12 '12 at 13:53
    
I think you can iterate from time but it will be very slow as it will create an item in the range for each second –  bcd May 12 '12 at 13:54
    
Not in 1.9 you can't, AFAICT, ultrahigh I didn't do it by a plain int. –  Dave Newton May 12 '12 at 14:08
    
Yup ... from 1.9 you can't do ranges on Time. Range works by calling the method succ on the start value of the range and in 1.9 the succ method on time was deprecated... –  bcd May 12 '12 at 19:49

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.