Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a class that holds an "error" function that will format some text. I want to accept a variable number of arguments and then format them using printf.

Example:

class MyClass
{
public:
    void Error(const char* format, ...);
};

The Error method should take in the parameters, call printf/sprintf to format it and then do something with it. I don't want to write all the formatting myself so it makes sense to try and figure out how to use the existing formatting.

share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 62 down vote accepted

Bad

void Error(const char* format, ...)
{
    char dest[1024 * 16];
    va_list argptr;
    va_start(argptr, format);
    vsprintf(dest, format, argptr);
    va_end(argptr);
    printf(dest);
}

This code is not so good. It uses a fixed-size character buffer which can lead to a buffer overrun error if the string is pathologically long. The arbitrary large 1024*16 size should set off a flag in your head. Also, the printf call could run into problems if dest ends up containing formatting codes. Better would be printf("%s", dest). But even better still would be using vprintf or vfprintf:

Good

void Error(const char* format, ...)
{
    va_list argptr;
    va_start(argptr, format);
    vfprintf(stderr, format, argptr);
    va_end(argptr);
}

If you want to manipulate the string before you display it and really do need it stored in a buffer first, please please please use vsnprintf instead of vsprintf. vsnprintf will prevent an accidental buffer overflow error.

share|improve this answer
    
John, thanks for the update and the amusing commentary. :) The code I put in the example was my first "yay, I figured out how to make it work" pass. I had discovered vsnprintf and that gave me ultimately what I wanted. Thanks! –  user5722 Jun 29 '09 at 14:27
    
Note: using varargs isn't necessarily a best practice. Tread carefully. –  J. Polfer Jul 1 '09 at 21:03

have a look at vsnprintf as this will do what ya want http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/vsprintf/

you will have to init the va_list arg array first, then call it.

Example from that link: /* vsprintf example */

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdarg.h>

void Error (char * format, ...)
{
  char buffer[256];
  va_list args;
  va_start (args, format);
  vsnprintf (buffer, 255, format, args);


  //do something with the error

  va_end (args);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! That's exactly what I was looking for! –  user5722 Jun 29 '09 at 3:16
    
Well selected it as the correct answer by clicking the tick :P –  Lodle Jun 29 '09 at 3:17
1  
I selected John Kugelman's response as it gave a more insight into the final answer and addressed the buffer issues both you and I had in our sample code. –  user5722 Jun 29 '09 at 14:33
    
Np's thats stack overflow for ya :P –  Lodle Jun 29 '09 at 17:35

Using functions with the ellipses is not very safe. If performance is not critical for log function consider using operator overloading as in boost::format. You could write something like this:

#include <sstream>
#include <boost/format.hpp>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class formatted_log_t {
public:
    formatted_log_t(const char* msg ) : fmt(msg) {}
    ~formatted_log_t() { cout << fmt << endl; }

    template <typename T>
    formatted_log_t& operator %(T value) {
        fmt % value;
        return *this;
    }

protected:
    boost::format                fmt;
};

formatted_log_t log(const char* msg) { return formatted_log_t( msg ); }

// use
int main ()
{
    log("hello %s in %d-th time") % "world" % 10000000;
    return 0;
}

The following sample demonstrates possible errors with ellipses:

int x = SOME_VALUE;
double y = SOME_MORE_VALUE;
printf( "some var = %f, other one %f", y, x ); // no errors at compile time, but error at runtime. compiler do not know types you wanted
log( "some var = %f, other one %f" ) % y % x; // no errors. %f only for compatibility. you could write %1% instead.
share|improve this answer

I should have read more on existing questions in stack overflow.

C++ Passing Variable Number of Arguments is a similar question. Mike F has the following explanation:

There's no way of calling (eg) printf without knowing how many arguments you're passing to it, unless you want to get into naughty and non-portable tricks.

The generally used solution is to always provide an alternate form of vararg functions, so printf has vprintf which takes a va_list in place of the .... The ... versions are just wrappers around the va_list versions.

This is exactly what I was looking for. I performed a test implementation like this:

void Error(const char* format, ...)
{
    char dest[1024 * 16];
    va_list argptr;
    va_start(argptr, format);
    vsprintf(dest, format, argptr);
    va_end(argptr);
    printf(dest);
}
share|improve this answer
    
The final 'printf(dest);' is mal-formed - it needs at least a format string too. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 29 '09 at 3:17
    
It doesnt as the string is the format string i.e. printf("a string"); is fine –  Lodle Jun 29 '09 at 3:22
2  
You can get away with printf(dest) up until dest happens to contain "%s" or "%d", then BOOM. Please use printf("%s", dest). –  John Kugelman Jun 29 '09 at 3:27
    
Brain death - you're right...confusing it with 'fprintf()'. But - you've got a different problem there. You should use 'vprintf()'. If the formatted output of 'vsprintf()' contains any % symbols, then you have a core dump looming. –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 29 '09 at 3:47
    
Just want to come by to point out that a core dump is the best case scenario, do that in server code and hackers will have your CPU for breakfast. –  MickLH Feb 6 at 20:03

Simple example below. Note you should pass in a larger buffer, and test to see if the buffer was large enough or not

void Log(LPCWSTR pFormat, ...) 
{
    va_list pArg;
    va_start(pArg, pFormat);
    char buf[1000];
    int len = _vsntprintf(buf, 1000, pFormat, pArg);
    va_end(pArg);
    //do something with buf
}
share|improve this answer

You are looking for variadic functions. printf() and sprintf() are variadic functions - they can accept a variable number of arguments.

This entails basically these steps:

  1. The first parameter must give some indication of the number of parameters that follow. So in printf(), the "format" parameter gives this indication - if you have 5 format specifiers, then it will look for 5 more arguments (for a total of 6 arguments.) The first argument could be an integer (eg "myfunction(3, a, b, c)" where "3" signifies "3 arguments)

  2. Then loop through and retrieve each successive argument, using the va_start() etc. functions.

There are plenty of tutorials on how to do this - good luck!

share|improve this answer

Have a look at the example http://www.cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdarg/va_arg/, they pass the number of arguments to the method but you can ommit that and modify the code appropriately (see the example).

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.