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I'm reading "Refactoring" by Martin Fowler.

There is a term "type code" that I've never seen that before.

What is a type code?

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3  
refactoring.com/catalog/replaceTypeCodeWithClass.html it has a very good example –  Habib May 12 '12 at 13:36
    
Thank for the comment. Before the question, I've read that link from googling. Thank you. –  user18640 May 12 '12 at 16:39

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One context in which a type code can appear is in C with a union type:

typedef enum Type { T_INT, T_FLOAT, T_DOUBLE, T_LONG } Type;

typedef struct Datum
{
    Type type;
    union
    {
        int     i;
        float   f;
        long    l;
        double  d;
    } u;
} Datum;

This leads to code like:

Datum v;

switch (v.type)
{
case T_INT:
    int_processing(v.u.i);
    break;
case T_FLOAT:
    float_processing(v.u.f);
    break;
case T_DOUBLE:
    double_processing(v.u.d);
    break;
}

Now, was the omission of T_LONG from the switch deliberate or not? Was it recently added and this switch didn't get the necessary update?

When you get a lot of code like that, and you need to add T_UNSIGNED, you have to go and find a lot of places to correct. With C, you don't have such a simple solution as 'create a class to represent the type'. It can be done, but it takes (a lot) more effort than with more Object Oriented languages.

But, the term 'type code' refers to something like the Type type in the example.

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Very detail and easy explanation with the example. Now I figured it out. Tahnk you! –  user18640 May 12 '12 at 16:37

Type code is when you'd want to have your own limited type for some purpose, and as a work around, create a bunch of numeric or string constants, which represent all possible values of your "type".

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