Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Basically, I have a constructor like this:

function A() {
    this.content = toArray(arguments); // toArray converts it to an array
}

I'd like to call it from another function:

function B() {
    return new A();
}

The problem is, I'd like to pass all of the arguments passed to B, to A as well.

I can't use apply (in a common way):

  • It won't be a constructor if I just apply it to any old object
  • I can't apply it to the prototype, unless there's an easy way to clone it that I don't know about
  • I can't just create a new A to pass to it again; in reality, A() throws if it isn't passed any arguments, and I'd like to keep this functionality.

I've come up with a few solutions:

  • Another constructor!

    function C() {}
    C.prototype = A.prototype;
    
    function B() {
        var obj = new C();
        A.apply(obj, arguments);
        return obj;
    }
    
  • Another function!

    function _A(_arguments) {
        if(_arguments.length === 0) {
            return this;
        }
    
        // Do initialization here!
    }
    
    _A.prototype.constructor = A;
    
    function A() {
        if(arguments.length === 0) {
            throw new Error("That's not good.");
        }
    
        return new _A(toArray(arguments));
    }
    
    function B() {
        return new _A(toArray(arguments));
    }
    
  • The rest of them are pretty much the same thing in a different format

But is there a really easy and obvious way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of Use of .apply() with 'new' operator. Is this possible? – Felix Kling May 12 '12 at 14:26
up vote 6 down vote accepted

In ES5 implementations, you can use Object.create to create the object that inherits from A.prototype, then .apply() the resulting object to the constructor.

function A() {
    this.content = toArray(arguments); // toArray converts it to an array
}

function B() {
    var obj = Object.create(A.prototype);
    A.apply(obj, arguments);
    return obj;
}

Then you could shim Object.create for non-supporting implementations.

if (!Object.create)
    Object.create = function(proto) {
        function f() {}
        f.prototype = proto;
        return new f;
    }

Of course it isn't a full shim, but it's enough for what you need.


Or you could create a function that effectively does it all for you.

function apply_constructor(constr, args) {
    var obj = Object.create(constr.prototype);
    constr.apply(obj, args);
    return obj;
}

And use it like this:

function B() {
    return apply_constructor(A, arguments);
}
share|improve this answer
    
Object.create is perfect. Thank you! – Ryan O'Hara May 12 '12 at 14:56
    
@minitech: You're welcome. – cliffs of insanity May 12 '12 at 15:03

In ES5, you can use bind.

function B() {
  var args = Array.prototype.slice.call(arguments);
  var curriedCtor = Function.prototype.bind
      .apply(A, [null].concat(args));
  return new curriedCtor();
}

so with

function A(x, y) {
  this.x = x;
  this.y = y;
}

var test = B(1, 2);

alert(JSON.stringify(test));  // alerts {"x":1,"y":2}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.