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I want to be able to detect when a user signs on to my application using passive acs, so that I can add them to my database if this is the first time using my app. Right now I am subscribing to WSFederationAuthenticationModule.SignedIn but I feel I'm missing something. Mainly I'm not sure the best place to subscribe to the event, I got it to work inside PostAuthenticateRequest but its a bit hacky. Any suggestions?

this code is from global.asax

    public override void Init()
    {

        base.Init();

        PostAuthenticateRequest += (s, e) =>
        {
            try
            {
                FederatedAuthentication.WSFederationAuthenticationModule.SignedIn -= SignedIn;
            }
            finally
            {
                FederatedAuthentication.WSFederationAuthenticationModule.SignedIn += SignedIn;
            }

        };


    }


    private void SignedIn(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
       //do something
    }

EDIT:

For now I'm going to use a flag variable to make sure I only subscribe once to SignedIn. Unless someone has any other suggestions that is :) thanks for the help Sandrino. Here is what I have at the moment.

    private static bool isFirstRequest = true;

    public override void Init()
    {


        base.Init();

        PostAuthenticateRequest += (s, e) => { 
        if (isFirstRequest)
        {
             FederatedAuthentication
                 .WSFederationAuthenticationModule.SignedIn += SignedIn;
             isFirstRequest = false;
        }

        };

    }


    private void SignedIn(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

        //do something   

    }

EDIT: A little more info. This problem happens if I'm using the azure emulator, it probably happens when deployed as well but I haven't tried that. I have tested if I am just not able to debug by trying to write to a text file and no text file was created.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Why do you subscribe to the SignedIn event each time the PostAuthenticateRequest event is raised? You can simple subscribe to it when the application starts (in the Global.asax) and it will be raised for each user that signed in:

public class MvcApplication : System.Web.HttpApplication
{
    ...

    protected void Application_Start()
    {
        ...

        FederatedAuthentication.ServiceConfigurationCreated += (s, e) =>
        {
            FederatedAuthentication.WSFederationAuthenticationModule.SignedIn += new EventHandler(OnUserSignedIn);
        };
    }

    private void OnUserSignedIn(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        // Custom logic here.   
    }
}

The SignedIn event is the best way to detect a user sign in before the application continues. Take a look at the following diagram. Before redirecting back to a page, the SignedIn event is raised to allow you to detect an user sign in:

Federated Authentication Module diagram

Reference: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee517293.aspx

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I tried to do that but WsFederationAuthenticationModule is null on application start but is available inside postauthenticate request. I believe my web config is correct, I didn't edit it manually to add the wsfederationmodule just used the add sts reference tool. –  Jack Woodward May 12 '12 at 17:23
    
I've adapted the code sample, it's true that WSFederationAuthenticationModule is not immediately available when the application starts. –  Sandrino Di Mattia May 12 '12 at 17:28
    
That still didn't work, WsFederationAuthenticationModule is available in that event but subscribing to the signedin event has no effect and all of the modules properties are empty. Perhaps the module available there is just a initial value and further down the pipeline a new instance replaces it. I'm going to just put a flag variable in global.asax and use it to force signedin to only get subscribed to once. I'm going to edit my question to reflect the new method. –  Jack Woodward May 12 '12 at 22:07
    
I tested the code and after a successful sign in (with Windows Live) the SignIn event is correctly triggered. Are you doing somethings special in your project? Could you try this by setting up a new MVC appliction? –  Sandrino Di Mattia May 13 '12 at 7:37
    
The new project does work, if I run it stand alone but not if I host in the azure emulator. From MSDN : The ServiceConfigurationCreated event is raised when the first HTTP module in the web application references ServiceConfiguration. You can modify this value by interacting with the ServiceConfiguration property in an event handler for the ServiceConfigurationCreated event. Perhaps the event is getting triggered for the azure environment before the federated authentication module is completely setup. –  Jack Woodward May 13 '12 at 19:19

I created a class that derives from ClaimsAuthenticationManager. There is only one method that you have to override, which is

public virtual IClaimsPrincipal Authenticate(string resourceName, IClaimsPrincipal incomingPrincipal);

In my app, I use this method to check if the user, who has successfully authenticated, is really a user of my app (i.e. they exist in my database). If not, I direct them to a signup page.

My class looks something like this:

public override IClaimsPrincipal Authenticate(string resourceName, IClaimsPrincipal incomingPrincipal)
    {
        if (incomingPrincipal.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
        {
            var identity = incomingPrincipal.Identity as IClaimsIdentity;                
            User user = null;

            // Get name identifier and identity provider
            var nameIdentifierClaim = identity.Claims.SingleOrDefault(c => c.ClaimType.Equals(ClaimTypes.NameIdentifier, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase));
            var identityProviderClaim = identity.Claims.SingleOrDefault(c => c.ClaimType.Equals(CustomClaimTypes.IdentityProviderClaimType, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase));

            if (nameIdentifierClaim == null || identityProviderClaim == null)
            {
                throw new AuthenticationErrorException("Invalid claims", "The claims provided by your Identity Provider are invalid. Please contact your administrator.");
            }

            try
            {
                //checking the database here...
                using (var context = new CloudContext())
                {
                    user = (from u in context.Users
                            where u.IdentityProvider == identityProviderClaim.Value &&
                                  u.NameIdentifier == nameIdentifierClaim.Value &&
                                  !u.Account.PendingDelete
                            select u).FirstOrDefault();
                }
            }
            catch (System.Data.DataException ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine(ex.Message);
                if (ex.InnerException != null)
                    Console.WriteLine(ex.InnerException);
                throw;
            }

        }

        return incomingPrincipal;
    }

Then, in your web.config, you add a section to the <microsoft.identitymodel> area, as so:

      <claimsAuthenticationManager type="CloudAnalyzer.UI.Security.CloudAnalyzerClaimsAuthenticationManager" />

I learned this trick from the sample app located here: Windows Azure Marketplace. Even if you're not going to publish in the Window Azure Marketplace it's a good sample with some helpful code snippets you can use for ACS integration.

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Awesome, I'm going to try this out. Off the top of your head if I were to add a claim to the collection at this point would it get put into the security token and be available at the next request? I will do more research so no worries if you would also need to look it up. –  Jack Woodward May 15 '12 at 4:22
    
Yes, you could add a claim here. The sample I reference above adds a custom claim for "tenantId", which is the account that a user belongs to. The sample has an "UpdateClaims" method that runs in this public override IClaimsPrincipal Authenticate method to validate supplied claims as well as custom ones. Check it out... –  ChrisW May 15 '12 at 18:11

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