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SUppose we have following definitions:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        System.out.println("------MAIN METHOD------");
        A a = new B();  
        a.a = 3;
        System.out.println(a.a);
    }

}

    public class A {

        int a;

        public void g(){
            System.out.println(a);
        }

    }

public class B extends A {}

Now, suppose we build the above and then modify B to be

public class B {}

and rebuild JUST B. When we turn the verifier off, the method prints 3! I understand that the verifier does not catch this, reslution checks in A that there s a field a, which is the case... But B does not have allocated space for integer field a! Where does it write it to then?

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up vote 4 down vote accepted

The java objects in memory are padded and aligned to be at least 16 bytes long, so in a class containing only an int field there is some unused space. If you add some more fields to A you would probably overwrite the storage space of other objects, but that might also not result in an immediate crash, especially in such a short application that immediately exits.

You could have some more fun by declaring the classes like this:

public class A {
    int[] a = new int[1];
}

public class B {
    int a = 0x01020304;
}

public class Test {
    public static void main(String[] args) {
        A a = new B();  
        a.a[0] = 3;
        System.out.println(a.a[0]);
    }
}

The result of executing this code via java -Xverify:none Test should result in a JVM error like the following, but in principle it should let you write anywhere into the memory of the java process:

------MAIN METHOD------
#
# A fatal error has been detected by the Java Runtime Environment:
#
#  SIGSEGV (0xb) at pc=0x00007f9147d69532, pid=14785, tid=140262017775360
#
# JRE version: 6.0_26-b03
# Java VM: Java HotSpot(TM) 64-Bit Server VM (20.1-b02 mixed mode linux-amd64 compressed oops)
# Problematic frame:
# j  Test.main([Ljava/lang/String;)V+17
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If you truly rebuilt only B, A a = new B(); should fail with a ClassCastException, as B would be no longer runtime compatible with A. Check that rebuilt B is in the runtime classpath, and that's the only B there.

Correction: VerifyError, not a ClassCastException.

Compile and run original code: C:\TMP>%JAVA_HOME%\bin\javac -s . *.java C:\TMP>%JAVA_HOME%\bin\java -cp . Test ------MAIN METHOD------ 3

Then update B.java, recompile, and run again: C:\TMP>%JAVA_HOME%\bin\javac -s . B.java C:\TMP>%JAVA_HOME%\bin\java -cp . Test Exception in thread "main" java.lang.VerifyError: Bad type on operand stack in putfield in method Test.main([Ljava/lang/String;)V at offset 18

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No it does not, run it yourself – Bober02 May 12 '12 at 15:42
    
OK, I was wrong - not a ClassCastException, but VerifierError. Originally all 3 files are compiled and run: C:\TMP>%JAVA_HOME%\bin\javac -s . *.java C:\TMP>%JAVA_HOME%\bin\java -cp . Test ------MAIN METHOD------ 3 Then update and recompile B.java, and run again: C:\TMP>%JAVA_HOME%\bin\javac -s . B.java, C:\TMP>%JAVA_HOME%\bin\java -cp . Test Exception in thread "main" java.lang.VerifyError – Andrey Nudko May 12 '12 at 16:07
    
Bober02 said something about turning off the verifier, did you do it and still get VerifyError exception? – riza May 12 '12 at 16:19
    
I looked at your answer but it is supposed to be without verifier on – Bober02 May 12 '12 at 17:23

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