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I wrote this function to filter a list to show all items after a given item is seen. Somewhat similar to the builtin string method str.rpartition(sep). I have a feeling there is a more compact way to do this, perhaps using a list comprehension. Any ideas?

def ignore_until(the_list, match):
    # Ignore all items in the_list prior to match
    found = False
    for index, item in enumerate(the_list):
        if item == match:
            found = True
            break
    if found:
        return the_list[index:]
    else:
        return []

my_list = ['red','orange','yellow','green']
assert ignore_until(my_list, 'yellow') == ['yellow','green']
assert ignore_until(my_list, 'blue') == []

EDIT:

After seeing the answers for the above question, I realized that 5 of the 6 answers focused on the index() builtin method for the list data type. Actually, I need to use a regular expression, and didn't realize that omitting that from my question would affect people's answers. Here's the regex code:

import re
def ignore_until(the_list, pattern):
    # Ignore all items in the_list prior to the item containing pattern.
    found = False
    for index, item in enumerate(the_list):
        if re.search(string=item, pattern=pattern):
            found = True
            break
    if found:
        return the_list[index:]
    else:
        return []

my_list = ['red','orange','yellow','green']
assert ignore_until(my_list, 'yellow') == ['yellow','green']
assert ignore_until(my_list, 'blue') == []
share|improve this question
    
Someday you will progress from using lists to using iterators and generators also, which don't support index() or slicing. @thg435's improved solution is generally applicable to any Python sequence, iterator, or generator. – Paul McGuire May 12 '12 at 18:01
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's a version that reproduces what str.partition does (i.e. returns three lists):

def partition(lst, item):
    if item in lst:
        n = lst.index(item)
        return lst[:n], [item], lst[n+1:]
    else:
        return lst, [], []

print partition(range(10), 7)

and here's a version which works with arbitrary iterables, not necessary lists:

def partition(it, item):
    a = [[]]
    for x in it:
        if x == item and len(a) == 1:
            a.append([item])
            a.append([])
        else:
            a[-1].append(x)
    return a

print partition((x for x in range(10)), 7)

Improved version:

def partition(it, item):
    a = []
    for x in it:
        if x == item:
            return a, [item], list(it)
        a.append(x)
    return a, [], []

print partition((x for x in range(10)), 7)
print partition((x for x in range(10)), 17)
share|improve this answer
    
I prefer handling arbitrary iterables, means you can accept a generator or some other sequence that doesn't support sliced access or the index() method. A nice thing about the new str.partition method is that it always returns a 3-element list. If item is not in the list, then you will return just a 1-element list. How about init'ing a to [[],[],[]], append to a[0] in your else clause, and if you find item, do a[1].append(item); a[2].extend(it). This will also consume the iterator into a[2], so you'll cleanly exit the for loop (with another StopIteration raised by the iterator). – Paul McGuire May 12 '12 at 17:27
    
Oh, and drop the and len(a) == 1 from the if condition, you won't need it any more because a[2].extend(it) will consume the iterator. – Paul McGuire May 12 '12 at 17:33
    
@Paul: actually, when item is found, we can return right away (see edit). – georg May 12 '12 at 17:35
    
of course, very neat! We are a good team. – Paul McGuire May 12 '12 at 17:50
    
Test cases: 1) item in middle of list; 2) item at end of list; 3) item at beginning of list; 4) item not in list; 5) item repeated in list; 6) empty list. – Paul McGuire May 12 '12 at 17:54

It's not much more compact, but how about:

def ignore_until(the_list, match):
    try:
        return the_list[the_list.index(match):]
    except ValueError:
        return []

my_list = ['red','orange','yellow','green']

print ignore_until(my_list, 'yellow') # => ['yellow','green']
print ignore_until(my_list, 'blue') # => []
share|improve this answer
    
+1 because your code catches only ValueErrors. If a different error occurs (for example, if the_list is None), I like having the error propagate. Some of the other answers would catch it and return []. – acattle May 12 '12 at 16:39
    
Thanks! The Zen of Python, lines 10 and 11: Errors should never pass silently. Unless explicitly silenced. – modocache May 12 '12 at 16:41

why not use the python yourlist.index(match) to find the index then apply list slicing. The python yourlist.index throws an error if the match is not found so you would need to take care of that.

def ignore_until(yourlist, match):
    try:
        return yourlist[yourlist.index(match):]
    except ValueError:
        return []
share|improve this answer

Try this:

def ignore_until(the_list, match):
    try:
        return [the_list[the_list.index(object):] for object in l if object == match][0]
    except IndexError:
        return []

A little hard to read but it's compact.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, accidentally put l in there. It's supposed to be the_list. – Harrison May 13 '12 at 18:00
    
I realize now that my answer was overly complicated. – Harrison May 13 '12 at 18:00

Have you thought about using the list.index() method? It returns the index of the first instance of a specified item (or else it throws an error)

def ignore_until(the_list, match):
    if match in the_list:
        index = the_list.index(match)
        return the_list[index:]

    else:
        return []

source: http://docs.python.org/tutorial/datastructures.html

share|improve this answer
    
Out of curiousity, is it more pythonic to use the try/catch block most other answers seem to use or the if statement I'm using? I tend to prefer explicitly avoiding exceptions over catching them. – acattle May 12 '12 at 16:36
    
I'd use your version - it's easier to read. The exception version implies that the reader knows that index() throws ValueError - not something obvious. – georg May 12 '12 at 16:59
def ignore_until(the_list, match):
    try:
        return my_list[the_list.index(match):]
    except ValueError:
        return []
share|improve this answer
    
ok, as I refine this, it just becomes modocache's solution. :) – Steve Bennett May 12 '12 at 16:22
2  
your try...except is not a good one. you need to specify the error being caught I reckon – cobie May 12 '12 at 16:24
    
probably.......... – Steve Bennett May 12 '12 at 16:29

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