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I write a script like this:

#!/bin/bash
LOG_PATH=/root/cngiqos-log
LOG_NAME=term.log
TERM_PATH=/home/bnrcqos/qos_M11/term
test -d $LOG_PATH || mkdir -p $LOG_PATH
routeID='M11'
if [ `ps -ef | grep 'term$' | grep -v grep | wc -l` -gt 0 ]; then
    echo $routeID' term process is already running'
else
    cd $TERM_PATH
    (nohup ./term > $LOG_PATH/$LOG_NAME 2>&1 &)
fi

And I input "tail -f /root/cngiqos-log/term.log" and see the log, the log loss info, the log only output part of a log and then don't output any more. But when I input "./term" and run it in fg, the output is fine. Does any body know why? Is it a system bug?

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it's likely the output of ./term is being buffered before it gets written to your log file. 1024/2048 etc are likely buffer sizes, so if you can force more log info to get written, you're likely to see your output. Also, why to you need the cmd in ( ... )? Removing that may solve your problem. OR see if you system has unbuffer (which unbuffer will show if it is your PATH, but it may be in other nonPATH dirs). Finally, running stuff with nohup and & looks like a good candiate for putting in your crontab, and removing those 2 elements from your script. Good luck. –  shellter May 12 '12 at 16:46
    
The term process should be always running. it's not a job task, I don't think that crontab meets my requriement. Does the term process which print frequently causes the problem? Before the system write to disk, then the buffer will be rewrite so the info lost? –  yanshuyuan May 13 '12 at 4:33

1 Answer 1

Maybe you just get what you asked for? tail just gives the last 10 lines by default.

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I know of -f, but even with -f you don't see the complete log before it starts waiting. And frankly, the OPs problem description is not clear enough to rule out this is the problem. Maybe s/he cares to rephrase the question and state the relation of the script presented with the commands actually run. –  Jens May 12 '12 at 16:46
    
Yes, I guess I can't rule that out, although I've never see it be an issue. I'm removing my comment. Good luck. –  shellter May 12 '12 at 16:50

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