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EDIT: To clear up some confusion, I am not actually using Male and Female. A better example would be parent-class Animal and sub-classes Cat and Dog.
I'm kind of new to OOP, but I've grasped it pretty well so far. However, there's one thing I can quite find a way of doing.
Firstly, I create a create a new object based around the user. The user can be be (for this example) male or female, but I cannot check if they are without checking in the database. I then need to create a new user object with the sub-class of their sex.
For example, here is my current (messy) code:

$user = new Person();
$userType = $user->GetUserType($userid);
if ($userType == 'Male') {
    $user = new Male($userid);
} else {
    $user = new Female($userid);
}

If I want to make a new object, I must do this every time, which is something I don't want to have to do.
Here's a little more code to help put this into perspective:

class Person {
function GetUserType($userid) {
        $db = mysqlConnect();
        $stmt = $db->stmt_init();
        // Get the players information
        $stmt->prepare("SELECT user_type FROM user_information WHERE user_id = ?");
        $stmt->bind_param('i', $userid);
        $stmt->execute();
        $stmt->bind_result($userType);
        $stmt->fetch();
        $stmt->close();
        $db->close();
        return $userType;
    }
}
class Male extends Person {
    // Male based things here
}
class Female extends Person {
    // Female based things here
}

So, in the __construct of the Person class, I'd like it to check for the users sex and set the appropriate sub-class.

share|improve this question
2  
why do you want to have subclasses for Male and Female here? Is there different or additional behavior? Please explain the difference between those two classes. –  Gordon May 12 '12 at 17:32
    
    
@Gordon Without explaining about the project I just chose an example to show that I'm looking for (a parent class that sets its own sub-class). My actual project does not use Male and Female, rather 2 other sub-classes. I have updated to give the example Animal, Cat and Dog. –  Joseph Duffy May 12 '12 at 17:50
    
@JosephDuffy thanks but that doesnt clear it up for me. The interesting thing would be to know how the behaviors differs, so we can see the real problem you are trying to solve. –  Gordon May 12 '12 at 18:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

So, in the __construct of the Person class, I'd like it to check for the users sex and set the appropriate sub-class.

Like already said elsewhere, ctors do not return, so you cannot do that. And ctors should not query the database anyway, because that would be doing work. If you cannot/want not create the correct subtype immediately via DataMapper or Repository, you can use a State Pattern:

Allow an object to alter its behavior when its internal state changes. The object will appear to change its class.

This is one of the Behavioral Patterns from the Gang Of Four book. The keyword, obviously, is behavior here. The State pattern is not about varying Subtypes (Cat, Dog) as such, but rather about the difference in the behavior those have. Hence my comments to your question.

Example:

interface GenderBehavior
{
    public function someBehavior();
    // can add more methods here
}

class FemalePersonBehavior implements GenderBehavior
{
    public function someBehavior()
    {
        // female specific behavior
    }
}

class MalePersonBehavior implements GenderBehavior
{
    public function someBehavior()
    {
        // male specific behavior
    }
}

class UnknownGenderBehavior implements GenderBehavior
{
    public function someBehavior()
    {
        // either implement a neutral behavior or
        throw new LogicException('Unknown Gender set');
    }
}

To create those instances, you add a Factory

class GenderBehaviorFactory
{
    public static function create($sex = null)
    {
        switch ($sex) {
           case 'male':
               return new MalePersonBehavior;
           case 'female':
               return new FemalePersonBehavior;
           default:
               return UnknownGenderBehavior;
        }
    }
}

Then you add the GenderBehavior interface to the Person class and tunnel all access to the interface methods to the Behavior instance:

class Person implements GenderBehavior
{
    private $behavior;

    public function __construct()
    {
        $this->behavior = GenderBehaviorFactory::create();
    }

    public function changeGender($sex)
    {
        $this->behavior = GenderBehaviorFactory::create($sex);
    }

    public function someBehavior()
    {
        $this->behavior->someBehavior();
    }
}

Now when you create a Person the first time, it will instantiate with an UnknownGenderBehavior and if you try to call someBehavior, it will raise an Exception. When you call changeGender with either male or female as argument, the appropriate GenderBehavior will be created and set to Person. And then you can call someBehavior.

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I've been trying to look over this over the last few days since I didn't get it the first time. I'm still struggling to fully understand it, but it has certainly helped, so thank you. My main problem is constructing the object. I create the object based on the users id, then get the rest of the information from the database in the __construct function. Where should I put these behaviours? –  Joseph Duffy May 16 '12 at 13:55
    
@JosephDuffy in a DataMapper –  Gordon May 16 '12 at 14:09
    
I'm looking into Data Mappers, and I've found phpdatamapper.com. From looking at its uses I can see why it will help (although a little complicated for me!). Since I don't know much about Data Mappers until I have a play with them, can you recommend/reject phpdatamapper.com? –  Joseph Duffy May 16 '12 at 14:52
    
@JosephDuffy If you dont have lots of impedance mismatch you can easily roll your own DataMapper. Create one class that knows how to fetch Rows from the database. Inject it into the Mapper. In the Mapper, map the row columns to the Object. –  Gordon May 16 '12 at 15:34
1  
Thanks for the help. Hopefully I'll learn about this sort of stuff at University :) –  Joseph Duffy May 16 '12 at 18:26

You cannot choose what to return from a constructor, but you can take your hierarchy as is (Person is of unknown gender, Male and Female are known) and use something like this pattern:

public class Person {
    public function ensureHasGender() {
        if ($this instanceof Male || $this instanceof Female) {
            return $this;
        }

        // now construct a Male or Female object from $this and return it
        $userType = $user->GetUserType($this->userid);
        return new $userType($this->userid);
    }
}

So you can now call $user->ensureHasGender() as many times as you like and it will only construct a gender-specific instance the first time.

However, I think this strategy is questionable. What do you stand to gain from having separate Male and Female classes? If their behavior were so much different then this could be justified, but that doesn't sound too likely. Perhaps handling the issue internally in the class with lazy loading and appropriate conditionals would be better.

share|improve this answer
    
I have edited the original post to reflect some of the questions you (and others) have had. A better example would be Animal with sub-classes Cat and Dog –  Joseph Duffy May 12 '12 at 17:56

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