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I don't understand why this is happening...

I need to get the objects startPoint which is set on mousedown and the current e.pageY from the mousemove to do some calculations.

var adjustHeight = {
    change: function(e) {
        console.log(this.startPoint)
        console.log(e.pageY);
    },
};

$('#dragger').mousedown(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();

    adjustHeight.startPoint = e.pageY;

    $(window).on('mousemove', adjustHeight.change());

    $(window).on('mouseup', function() {
        $(window).off('mousemove', adjustHeight.change())
    });
})

However the console prints out the objects startPoint which is what I expect but e.pageY is undefined

but when I use this line instead

...
    $(window).on('mousemove', adjustHeight.change);

    $(window).on('mouseup', function() {
        $(window).off('mousemove', adjustHeight.change)
    });
...

I get the e.pageY as expected but now the startPoint is undefined. When I checked what this was pointing at it was the DOMWindow....

My question is why is this happening and how would I go about getting both objects properties and the functions e at the same time?

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
$(window).on('mousemove', adjustHeight.change());

is executing adjustHeight.change immediately and passing the return value to .on(). Since you are not passing any argument to adjustHeight.change, e will be undefined (and e.pageY won't be available).


$(window).on('mousemove', adjustHeight.change);

correctly passes the function to .on, hence later the event object is passed to the handler and you can access e.pageY. But the context (this) is not adjustHeight anymore, it's the DOM element you bound the handler to. Which is window in this case and window does not have a startPoint property.

The MDN documentation has an excellent article about this (in general), as does quirksmode.org (with respect to event handlers).


Solution:

Pass a new function as handler, which calls adjustHeight.change and passes the event object:

$(window).on('mousemove', function(event) {
    adjustHeight.change(event);
});

or bind adjustHeight.change to adjustHeight using $.proxy [docs]:

$(window).on('mousemove', $.proxy(adjustHeight.change, adjustHeight));

Since you also want to unbind the handler later, you should either assign it to a variable or use a namespaced event [docs].

Example:

$(window).on('mousemove.dragger', $.proxy(adjustHeight.change, adjustHeight));

$(window).on('mouseup.dragger', function() {
    // removes both, the mousemove and mousup event handlers
    $(window).off('.dragger');
});
share|improve this answer

...

$(window).on('mousemove', adjustHeight.change);

$(window).on('mouseup', function() {
    $(window).off('mousemove', adjustHeight.change)
});

...

(line:3)

console.log("start:" + adjustHeight.startPoint)
share|improve this answer

First of all, this is wrong:

$(window).on('mousemove', adjustHeight.change());

Then, change() is not bound to adjustHeight by default. You'd have to do something like:

$(window).on('mousemove', function() {
    adjustHeight.change();
});

Or, in modern browsers:

$(window).on('mousemove', adjustHeight.change.bind(adjustHeight));
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