Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In java bytecode why is the receiver is pushed onto the stack first followed by all the parameters? I seem to remember it being something to do with efficiency.

This is true for both method calls and setting fields.

Method Call

class X {

    int p(int a) {
        //Do something
    }
    int main() {
        int ret = p(1);
    }

}

Main method compiles to:

aload_0 // Load this onto the stack
iconst_1 // Load constant 1 onto the stack
invokevirtual <int p(int)> from class X

Setting a field:

class X {
    int x;
    int main() {
        x = 1;
    }

}

Main method compiles to:

aload_0 // Load this onto the stack
iconst_1 // Load constant 1 onto the stack
putfield <int x> from class X
share|improve this question
    
Think I have figured it out but I can't answer as I don't have enough points! –  Jonathan Evans May 12 '12 at 17:56
    
This is one of those "idle curiosity" questions. Interesting, but the answer is of no practical use ... unless you are contemplating designing a brand new bytecode instruction set. –  Stephen C May 29 '12 at 5:06
    
your point being? Learning how a computer works is an "idle curiosity" question to most. –  Jonathan Evans Jun 3 '12 at 4:47
    
Well ... if it is idle curiousity, you should be doing your own research ... –  Stephen C Jun 3 '12 at 4:55

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Being pushed first has advantages in that

  • The target method can use the denser "aload0" bytecode (smaller than if it were much later in the parameter list and had to use a parametric version of the aload bytecode. Because "this" is often referenced in methods for both field and method access, it leads to a real code density improvement.
  • One often does cascading method sends like "foo.bar().baz()". When bar() returns, the future "this" for .baz() is magically already in the right place on the stack if you arrange things as was done in Java.
share|improve this answer
    
These answers are plausible, but in reality the bytecodes get compiled to native code, and neither of these advantages play out once that happens. –  Stephen C May 29 '12 at 5:04
    
That's not correct for the second point on most RISC architectures like POWER where both parameters and return values are actually in registers. Having them line up correctly (return -> arg 0) works very well and improves performance. Also, on the first point, while 1 byte doesn't seem like much, the JVM often has to keep the bytecodes in memory (think class rewriting, etc.. from JVMTI) and adding up all those saved 1 bytes across thousands of classes adds up to non-trivial memory. –  Trent Gray-Donald May 29 '12 at 5:24
    
You are assuming that the virtual stack layout in the bytecode model resembles the physical stack layout used by the JIT compiled code. Can you justify that assumption? Re memory usage, a saving of tens or hundreds of thousands of bytes of bytecode >>is<< trivial ... on machines with gigabytes of physical memory. Besides, once the bytecodes are JIT compiled they can be garbage collected. (I'm not sure if they are ...) And optimizing for the JVMTI case seems kind of pointless. –  Stephen C May 29 '12 at 7:31
    
I can certainly justify it for the IBM JVM (J9) - I was one of the tech leads and wrote one of the JIT code generators and while the exact stack shape is different, the particular lining up of return value and parameter zero is very, very handy. re: memory usage, I understand your thought, but this was a decision made 20 years ago in the context of small, embedded systems. Things like that all add up, a byte here, a byte there. Remember, I'm not justifying the decision for 2012, I'm justifying how it was made in the early 1990s. –  Trent Gray-Donald May 29 '12 at 8:42
    
re: bytecodes being JIT compiled then GCed, you could, you don't want to for several reasons: 1) the JIT may want the bytecodes for later to inline one method into another. Or to recompile at higher opt levels (J9 and HotSpot both does this to various degrees) Without the source bytecodes, that's not easy. 2) optimization assumptions can change (new classes loaded that break JIT compile-time assumptions) and you need to recompile for correctness. 3) classes aren't typically stored on the heap and are all one big entangled blob, so reclaiming partial classes is challenging in practice. –  Trent Gray-Donald May 29 '12 at 8:51

Are you asking why it is pushed at all? In both cases you're accessing something that belongs to an instance of the class, so this has to be part of that process.

Are you asking why it is pushed first? Just Java convention. I guess it's convenient to always have this first regardless of the many things that could follow.

share|improve this answer
    
Asking the latter. The examples clearly show that I know why this is there. Thats the reason I thought of but it wouldn't let me post. It doesn't seem to be efficiency based as I'm sure I was told that it was. Hypothetically, even if the this was last you should still be able to resolve the position of it statically at compilation. I can't think of anything which would mean that you can't although I only know very basic JVM constructs. –  Jonathan Evans May 12 '12 at 22:20

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.