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I have 2 files like these:

file1

1 2 3 . . .

1 -2 4 . . .

1 2 5 . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . .

file 2

1 0.33 3 . . .

2 0.14 4 . . .

3 2.155 5 . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

I need to check line by line the condition ($1==1 && $2==-2) in file1 and modify the corresponding line in file2, with $3=-2

I am trying with:

awk -F '\t' '{ BEGIN { FS=OFS="\t" } if ($1==1 && ($2==-2) {getline < "file2" ; $3=8; print $0} else {getline < "file2" ; print $0}  }' file1

So that the output file should be:

1 0.33 3 . . .

2 0.14 8 . . .

3 2.155 5 . . .

. . . . . .

. . . . . .

but it seems like some character or space is modified. Maybe with Python it is simpler to tackle this problem? Any suggestion?

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What about a solution with python? –  no_name May 12 '12 at 22:14

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Since you asked about python

#!/usr/bin/env python

with open('f1') as  fd:
    f1 = [map(int,i.strip().split()) for i in fd]
with open('f2') as  fd:
    f2 = [map(float,i.strip().split()) for i in fd]

for n, f in enumerate(f2):
    if f1[n][0] == 1 and f1[n][1] == -2:
        print f[0], f[1], 8
    else:
        print f
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Only if (...) f[2]=8 Thank you very much! –  no_name May 13 '12 at 0:59

I did with bash & sed, I don't know why (but there's the bash tag on the question, so it's kinda on topic):

$ cat /tmp/1
1   2   3   .   .   .
1   -2  4   .   .   .
1   -2  5   .   .   .
.   .   .   .   .   .
.   .   .   .   .

(tab-separated)

$ cat /tmp/2
1   0.33    3   .   .   .
2   0.14    4   .   .   .
3   2.155   5   .   .   .
.   .   .   .   .   .
.   .   .   .   .   .

$ lines=`grep -n "^1      -2      " /tmp/1 | sed 's/:.*//'`
$ for l in $lines; do sed -ri "${l}s/^(\S*)\t(\S*)\t\S*/\1\t\2\t8/" /tmp/2; done
$ cat /tmp/2
1   0.33    3   .   .   .
2   0.14    8   .   .   .
3   2.155   8   .   .   .
.   .   .   .   .   .
.   .   .   .   .   .

This is probably awful scripting, I've never been good at bash, but I'll justify the wasted time by posting it.

share|improve this answer

You want to set the output field separator in awk as well:

awk -F '\t' -v OFS='\t' ' { if ... }' file1

FYI, the paste and cut commands can simplify the awk script:

cut -f1,2 file1 | paste - file2 | \
awk -F '\t' -v OFS '\t' '$1==1 && $2==-2 {$5=8}; {print}' | \
cut -f3-

You take just the first two fields from each line of file1, use paste to add them to the beginning of the corresponding line in file2, then modify field 5 (corresponding to field 3 in file2) if appropriate and output the entire line, and finally strip out the fields from file1.

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The solution with the combination of cut, past and awk is very brilliant! It seems to work at first sight. Anyway, once I use the output file as an input file for a python script (in which I need to create a an array with a particular field and a matrix with almost the rest of the fields), it returns "arr = N.array(data, dtype=dtype, copy=copy) ValueError: setting an array element with a sequence.". Maybe, there are some problems with char and float. Thus, I suppose it is better to translate this code directly in python... Is there a fast solution for this problem? Thank you all in advance! –  no_name May 12 '12 at 22:13

You don't need to use -F since you're setting FS and OFS inside your BEGIN block.

You have some curly braces and parentheses out of place.

$ awk 'BEGIN { FS = OFS = "\t" } {if ($1 == 1 && $2 == -2) {getline < "file2"; $3 = 8} else {getline < "file2"}; print  }' file1
1   0.33    3
2   0.14    8
3   2.155   5
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