Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the follow HTML:

<div id="menu">
    <ul class="menu">
        <li class="item-101"><a href="/">Home</a></li>
        <li class="item-113"><a href="/sobre">Sobre</a></li>
        <li class="item-114"><a href="/portfolio">Portfolio</a></li>
        <li class="item-115"><a href="/bastidores">Bastidores</a></li>
        <li class="item-116"><a href="/blog">Blog</a></li>
        <li class="item-117"><a href="/contato">Contato</a></li>
    </ul>
</div>

and CSS:

#menu{width:900px;margin:0 auto;}
#menu ul{margin:0;padding:0;}
#menu li{float:left;margin:10px;}
#menu .item-115, #menu .item-116, #menu .item-117{float:right;}

I want 3 menus floating left and 3 floating right, but they are reverting order.

How to do this?

share|improve this question
    
Copied your stuff to jsfiddle; it looks correct! jsfiddle.net/xeQBd Did you applied any list-styles or display to #menu, ul or li? –  Dennis Hunink May 12 '12 at 20:10
    
The order is Home Sobre Portfolio Bastidores Blog Contato. See your jsfiddle: Home Sobre Portfolio Contato Blog Bastidores –  Gabriel Santos May 12 '12 at 20:15
1  
You're right on that one, sorry. Posted a answer, that should do the trick for you! –  Dennis Hunink May 12 '12 at 20:23

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Here's what I suggest: http://jsfiddle.net/thirtydot/w64Nb/2/

The HTML is identical to what's in your question.

No, .item-{uid-for-menu} are random, but for each li I can float with jquery last tree menu. – Gabriel Santos

@thirtydot assume the class always will be the same, and suggest one solution, then, I adapt my javascript to generate the same class as my sample class. – Gabriel Santos

Instead of relying on certain classes being present, or forcing them to be the same using JavaScript, you can just solve the whole problem with jQuery (which in a different comment, you said you have available):

$($('#menu li').slice(-3).get().reverse())
    .addClass('right').remove().appendTo('#menu .menu');​

That will take the last three li inside #menu, add the .right class (which is just float: right), and reverse the order in the HTML.

share|improve this answer

You can do it like this. http://jsfiddle.net/xeQBd/1/ Simply don't let the 'left' items float; only apply to the ones that you need to float to the right.

#menu{width:900px;margin:0 auto;}
#menu ul{
    margin:0;padding:0; display:block;
}
#menu li{
    margin:10px;
    display:inline-block;
}
#menu .item-115, #menu .item-116, #menu .item-117{
    float:right;
}​

I've used something like this on www.hoeve-bouwlust.nl/activiteiten in the menu

share|improve this answer
1  
The problem is that the order is flipped. –  Second Rikudo May 12 '12 at 20:26
    
But you reversed order of menu inside HTML. <li>Contact en Route</li>, <li>Foto's</li>, <li>Nieuws</li> –  Gabriel Santos May 12 '12 at 20:27
1  
You're right, my fault completely. Not a real nice solution, but one that's used from time by time: wrap the elements within another (can be a div, can be a li). jsfiddle.net/xeQBd/3 This question and it's answer reflect you're problem. stackoverflow.com/questions/3585794/… You just can't do it without changing the html (you can use JS if you like) –  Dennis Hunink May 12 '12 at 20:36

Hold each in its own list

<nav>
    <ul class="menu menu-to-the-left">
        <li class="item-101"><a href="/">Home</a></li>
        <li class="item-113"><a href="/sobre">Sobre</a></li>
        <li class="item-114"><a href="/portfolio">Portfolio</a></li>
    </ul>
    <ul class="menu menu-to-the-right">
        <li class="item-115"><a href="/bastidores">Bastidores</a></li>
        <li class="item-116"><a href="/blog">Blog</a></li>
        <li class="item-117"><a href="/contato">Contato</a></li>
    </ul>
</nav>

In case you cannot edit the source code, you can do something like this. It involves setting fixed widths on menu items though. Live Example:

#menu {
    width:  900px;
    margin: 0 auto;
}

#menu ul {
    margin:  0;
    padding: 0;
}

#menu li, #menu li a {
    float:  left;
    width: 100px;
}
#menu li:nth-child(4) {
    margin-left: 300px;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I know I can do this, but, because the code is auto generated, I cant divide the menu. –  Gabriel Santos May 12 '12 at 20:18
1  
@GabrielSantos: In which case, I doubt this is possible. Interested in others' solutions though. –  Second Rikudo May 12 '12 at 20:26
    
I think the same, but I decided to ask, even already having a solution that solves the problem, which is reverse order of tree last li order. –  Gabriel Santos May 12 '12 at 20:28
    
@GabrielSantos: Will there always be only 6 menu items? Are they of equal widths (or do you care if they would?) –  Second Rikudo May 12 '12 at 20:30
    
6 menu itens, with the width of text inside each one. –  Gabriel Santos May 12 '12 at 20:31

You can achieve this with pure css, just set the display property of the lis to inline-block and the text-align property of the ul to right, then float the first three lis to left so they get back to their original position without messing up with the order they are declared in the document. Like this:

#menu{width:900px;margin:0 auto;}
#menu ul{margin:0;padding:0; text-align: right}
#menu li{display:inline-block;margin:10px;}
#menu .item-101, #menu .item-113, #menu .item-114{float: left}​

Live example:

Hope it helps.

share|improve this answer

CSS:

#menu{width:900px;margin:0 auto;}
#menu ul{margin:0;padding:0;}
#menu li{margin:10px;width:100px}
.item-115,.item-116,.item-117{float:right;}
.item-101,.item-113,.item-114{float:left;}
share|improve this answer
    
Dont work, and #menu li{float:left}` and .item-115,.item-116,.item-117{float:right;} do the same. –  Gabriel Santos May 12 '12 at 20:22

my solution preview:

enter image description here

i think you can change the order of you menu items, so you only must to reverse order of last three items (online demo on dabblet.com):

<div id="menu">
    <ul class="menu">
        <li class="item-101"><a href="/">Home</a></li>
        <li class="item-113"><a href="/sobre">Sobre</a></li>
        <li class="item-114"><a href="/portfolio">Portfolio</a></li>

        <!-- reverse order of last three items -->
        <li class="item-117"><a href="/contato">Contato</a></li>
        <li class="item-116"><a href="/blog">Blog</a></li>
        <li class="item-115"><a href="/bastidores">Bastidores</a></li>
    </ul>
</div>
share|improve this answer
1  
I will do this if can't see other solution. The problem is, the order is generated from backend, which user can edit, and he don't know or want to know he have to reverse order menu.. –  Gabriel Santos May 12 '12 at 20:20
    
@GabrielSantos: When you say the "user can edit", are those classes on the lis always going to stay the same? Is it always going to be .item-101, .item-113, and so on? –  thirtydot May 12 '12 at 20:41
    
No, .item-{uid-for-menu} are random, but for each li I can float with jquery last tree menu. –  Gabriel Santos May 12 '12 at 20:44
    
@thirtydot i think we can use nth-child(3) ~ li selector to detect second half of menu items, because only 6 items exists in menu –  Vladimir Starkov May 12 '12 at 20:45
    
@GabrielSantos: Well, the classes not remaining the same means that they can't be used in the solution. Your original question implies that the classes can be used. This isn't particularly easy to fix with CSS, and since you're already using JavaScript/jQuery on the page, you might as well just fix this problem with jQuery. –  thirtydot May 12 '12 at 20:49

I believe you are wondering why the order of right-floated element if flipped, this how the floats are supposed to behave. It is all described here:

A floated box is shifted to the left or right until its outer edge touches the containing block edge or the outer edge of another float.

For the three right floated elements in your example, the first one (source-order-wise) aligns with the right edge. The next item in also shifts towards right; only to find another float in its way and stops. Likewise for the third float.

The solution is to create one right floated container which contains the three supposed-to-be-right-floated elements, floated left.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.