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On button1_click one messagebox after another appear - first showing 30 the second showing 200:

public partial class Form1 : Form
{

    delegate void myMathFunction(int j, int q);

    void add(int x, int y) {MessageBox.Show((x + y).ToString());}

    void multiply(int x, int y){MessageBox.Show((x*y).ToString());}

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        myMathFunction foo = new myMathFunction(add);
        foo+= new myMathFunction(multiply);

        foo.Invoke(10, 20);
    }

    public Form1() { InitializeComponent(); }
}

but the following just goes straight to the 200 and yet I've assigned both methods to the delegate - what has happened to add and why does it choose to use multiply?

public partial class Form1 : Form
{

    delegate int myMathFunction(int j, int q);

    int add(int x, int y){return x + y;}

    int multiply(int x, int y) {return x * y;}

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        myMathFunction foo = new myMathFunction(add);
        foo += new myMathFunction(multiply);

        MessageBox.Show(foo.Invoke(10, 20).ToString());
    }

    public Form1() { InitializeComponent(); }
}

Can the second code sample be amended so that the delegate runs the add method rather than the multiply method?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

When your delegate has multiple functions attached to it, each one is invoked in turn. If the delegate has a non-void return value, the return value of the last function is what is returned.

The language specification, 15.4 Delegate invocation, says

If the delegate invocation includes output parameters or a return value, their final value will come from the invocation of the last delegate in the list.

So, when you call foo.Invoke(10, 20), the following happens:

  • First, add(10, 20) is called which returns 30.
  • Then, multiply(10, 20) is called which returns 200 and that value is returned to the original caller.

In your follow-up question you ask

Can the second code sample be amended so that the delegate runs the add method rather than the multiply method?

As explained above, the add method and the multiply method are both executed. The return value from the last executed method is what is returned to the caller. So, if you want the value resulting from calling add to be returned, it must be the last method added to the delegate instance.

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how do i amend it so that it runs add rather than multiply? –  whytheq May 13 '12 at 10:00
    
it's always going to execute both. You can just add one function to your delegate instance. Or you could add the add function last. The answers that you have make it very clear how delegate invocation handles return values. What you have not told is what you ultimate goals are. What problem are you trying to solve? –  David Heffernan May 13 '12 at 10:05
    
i'm just trying to understand delegates! nothing more than curiosity David. If both functions are added to the delegate what's the point in adding the first function if I can't get at it?! –  whytheq May 13 '12 at 10:16
    
Delegates seldom have return values for this very reason. A return value is just a single slot. Clearly only one value can be returned. If you want to get multiple values back pass a list as a parameter to the delegate and ask each method to add a value to the list. Anyway, I believe your question has been answered. –  David Heffernan May 13 '12 at 10:21
    
ok got it (I think) at the point of invokation only the last method added can be returned it's impossible to return any of the functions added earlier. These function will have been executed but returning there values is not possible ....only by switching the order. Although if it was returning info to a winform then each answer could be returned to, say different labels? –  whytheq May 13 '12 at 10:22
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From the C# language specification (§22.3):

Invocation of a delegate instance whose invocation list contains multiple entries, proceeds by invoking each of the methods in the invocation list, synchronously, in order. Each method so called is passed the same set of arguments as was given to the delegate instance. If such a delegate invocation includes reference parameters (§17.5.1.2), each method invocation will occur with a reference to the same variable; changes to that variable by one method in the invocation list will be visible to methods further down the invocation list. If the delegate invocation includes output parameters or a return value, their final value will come from the invocation of the last delegate in the list. If an exception occurs during processing of the invocation of such a delegate, and that exception is not caught within the method that was invoked, the search for an exception catch clause continues in the method that called the delegate, and any methods further down the invocation list are not invoked.

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how do i amend it so that it runs add rather than multiply? –  whytheq May 13 '12 at 10:00
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