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I want to pass a pointer of the current object to a newly created object of the same type. I tried it like this, but somehow the new object prev field points to itself. I'm using the Microsoft Visual C++ compiler.

Class A{

    A *prev;

    A(A* a)
    {
        prev = a;
    }
    vector<A> addToVector()
    {
        vector<A> res;
        res.push_back(A(this));
        return res;
    }

};

Now when i get the result from the vector, and add that to a queue, the pointer points to itself rather than its predecessor. What is going wrong?

--- EDIT

Here the code snippet where i add the new states to a vector and return them

const int dim = 3;

int goal[] = {1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,0};

class State{
public:
vector<int> board;
const State *prev;
int g;
int h() const{
    int res = 0;
    for(int i=0; i<dim*dim; i++){
        if(goal[i] != board[i]) res++;
        }
    return res;
    }
inline bool operator==(const State &other) const{
    bool eq = true;
    for(int i=0; eq && i<dim*dim; i++){
        eq = board[i] == other.board[i];
        }
    return eq;
    }

inline bool operator<(const State& other) const{
    return g + h() > other.g + other.h();
    }
inline State& operator=(const State& other){
    this->board = other.board;
    this->g = other.g;
    this->prev = other.prev;
    assert(this != prev);
    return *this;
    }
State(int a[], int b, const State *p){
    board.assign(a, a+dim*dim);
    g = b;
    prev = p;
    assert(prev != this);
    }
bool isSolution(){
    bool isSol = true;
    for(int i=0; i<dim*dim && isSol; i++){
        isSol = board[i] == goal[i];
        }
    return isSol;
}

vector<State> getSuccessors(){
    vector<State> successors;
    // find zero
    bool found = false;
    int z_pos;
    for(int i=0; i<dim*dim && !found; i++){
        found = board[i] == 0;
        if(found) z_pos = i; 
        }
    switch(z_pos){
    case 0:
        {
        // 1st row left
        int n1[] = {board[1], 0, board[2], board[3],board[4],board[5],board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        // 1st columnn up
        int n2[] = {board[3], board[1], board[2], 0,board[4],board[5],board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        State s1(n1, g+1, this);
        State s2(n2, g+1, this);
        successors.push_back(s1);
        successors.push_back(s2);
        } break;
    case 1:
        {
        // 1st row left
        int n1[] = {board[0], board[2], 0, board[3],board[4],board[5],board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        // 1st row right
        int n2[] = {0, board[0], board[2], board[3],board[4],board[5],board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        // 2nd column up
        int n3[] = {board[0], board[4], board[2], board[3],0,board[5],board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        State s1 (n1, g+1, this);
        State s2 (n2, g+1, this);
        State s3 (n3, g+1, this);
        successors.push_back(s1);
        successors.push_back(s2);
        successors.push_back(s3);
        } break;
    case 2:
        {
        // 1st row right
        int n1[] = {board[0], 0, board[1], board[3],board[4],board[5],board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        // 3rd column up
        int n2[] = {board[0], board[1], board[5], board[3],board[4],0,board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        State s1(n1, g+1, this);
        State s2(n2, g+1, this);
        successors.push_back(s1);
        successors.push_back(s2);
        } break;
    case 3:
        {
        // 1st column up
        int n1[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], board[6],board[4],board[5],0,board[7],board[8]};
        // 1st column down
        int n2[] = {0, board[1], board[2], board[0],board[4],board[5],board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        // row 2 left
        int n3[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], board[4],0,board[5],board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        State s1(n1, g+1, this);
        State s2(n2, g+1, this);
        State s3(n3, g+1, this);
        successors.push_back(s1);
        successors.push_back(s2);
        successors.push_back(s3);
        } break;
    case 4:
        {
        // row 2 right
        int n1[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], 0,board[3],board[5],board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        // row 2 left
        int n2[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], board[3],board[5],0,board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        // column 2 up
        int n3[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], board[3],board[7],board[5],board[6],0,board[8]};
        // column 2 down
        int n4[] = {board[0], 0, board[2], board[3],board[1],board[5],board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        State s1(n1, g+1, this);
        State s2(n2, g+1, this);
        State s3(n3, g+1, this);
        State s4(n4, g+1, this);
        successors.push_back(s1);
        successors.push_back(s2);
        successors.push_back(s3);
        successors.push_back(s4);
        } break;
    case 5:
        {
        // row 2 right
        int n1[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], board[3],0,board[4],board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        // column 3 up
        int n2[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], board[3],board[4],board[8],board[6],board[7],0};
        // column 3 down
        int n3[] = {board[0], board[1], 0, board[3],board[4],board[2],board[6],board[7],board[8]};
        State s1(n1, g+1, this);
        State s2(n2, g+1, this);
        State s3(n3, g+1, this);
        successors.push_back(s1);
        successors.push_back(s2);
        successors.push_back(s3);
        } break;
    case 6:
        {
        // row 3 left
        int n1[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], board[3],board[4],board[5],board[7],0,board[8]};
        // column 1 down
        int n2[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], 0,board[4],board[5],board[3],board[7],board[8]};
        State s1(n1, g+1, this);
        State s2(n2, g+1, this);
        successors.push_back(s1);
        successors.push_back(s2);
        } break;
    case 7:
        {
        // row 3 right
        int n1[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], board[3],board[4],board[5],0,board[6],board[8]};
        // row 3 left
        int n2[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], board[3],board[4],board[5],board[6],board[8],0};
        // column 2 down
        int n3[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], board[3],0,board[5],board[6],board[4],board[8]};
        State s1(n1, g+1, this);
        State s2(n2, g+1, this);
        State s3(n3, g+1, this);
        successors.push_back(s1);
        successors.push_back(s2);
        successors.push_back(s3);
        } break;
    case 8:
        {
        // row 3 right
        int n1[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], board[3],board[4],board[5],board[6],0,board[7]};
        // column 3 down
        int n2[] = {board[0], board[1], board[2], board[3],board[4],0,board[6],board[7],board[5]};
        State s1(n1, g+1, this);
        State s2(n2, g+1, this);
        successors.push_back(s1);
        successors.push_back(s2);
        } break;
    }
    return successors;
}

void getPath(){
    assert(prev == this);
    cin.get();
    }

};


void solve(){
priority_queue<State> openSet;
set< vector<int> > closedSet;
int init[] = {1,0,3,4,2,6,7,5,8};
State initial(init,0,NULL);
openSet.push(initial);
while(!openSet.empty()){
    State n = openSet.top();
    assert(&n != n.prev); //FAILS
    openSet.pop();
    if(n.isSolution()){
        cout << "openSet size:   " << openSet.size() << endl;
        cout << "closedSet size: " << closedSet.size() << endl;
        n.getPath();
        break;
        }
    else if(closedSet.find(n.board) != closedSet.end()){
        ; // skip
        }
    else{
        closedSet.insert(n.board);
        vector<State> successors = n.getSuccessors();
        for(int i=0; i<successors.size(); i++){
            if(closedSet.find(successors[i].board) == closedSet.end()) openSet.push(successors[i]);
        }
    }
}
}

int main(){
//freopen("packrec.in", "r", stdin);
//freopen("packrec.out", "w", stdout);
//int t; cin >> t; while(t--)
    solve();
return 0;
}
share|improve this question
3  
could you add some code to explain how you use addToVector() and what you expect to happen? –  juanchopanza May 12 '12 at 22:00
    
I'm using the fuction to compute the successors of a particular node. Then i add them to a priority queue. Basically I'm doing the A* algorithm. –  Stackd May 12 '12 at 22:05
    
Could it be that once the objects are popped from the priority queue, they are cleaned up? Still doesnt really explain why it then points to itself. –  Stackd May 12 '12 at 22:07
    
I doubt it is to do with the priority queue. Your addToVector() method looks suspicious in many ways, which is why a code snippet would help. –  juanchopanza May 12 '12 at 22:11
1  
you are not even using addToVector() there. –  juanchopanza May 12 '12 at 22:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Without reading the (long) context code, you need to be careful not to call addToVector on an object which will go out of scope. Since it must be illegal to directly create a local object of type A (since a vector could outlive it), all constructors A::A should be private (except for the copy constructor, which vector must access) and objects should instead be returned from factory functions, of which addToVector is one.

It is easy to write a loop where you intend to create a series of linked objects by defining a local variable, but because the address of the local is the same at each iteration of the loop, all the objects appear to be identical. This could easily cause a self link.

Ah, I searched for addToVector in the context code and it's not even used at all. So the generic advice stands. And this is after your edit to extend the code, by the way.

share|improve this answer
    
I make different local variables of type State and add them to the vector. When the function returns the elements of the vector point to the right predecessor. But once i push them onto a priority queue and access them again, they will point to themselves. –  Stackd May 14 '12 at 8:35
    
@Stackd: I read some of your code after posting the answer… you really should be careful to make a connection between the reduced case and the gigantic full source post, especially if the reduced case doesn't reproduce the problem. (sscce.org) Anyway, you should be aware that priority_queue moves its contents around and top() will return * begin() from the underlying container, which will always be the same address barring reallocations. You should not keep any pointer to an object inside a priority_queue. –  Potatoswatter May 15 '12 at 1:32
    
Is there any way I can keep track of what object originally created that object, since pointer will not work? –  Stackd May 15 '12 at 15:09
    
@Stackd You might populate the priority_queue with pointers to objects held elsewhere. Use a custom comparator functor to sort the pointers by the values of the State objects they point to. –  Potatoswatter May 16 '12 at 3:49

With you construction it seems impossible to get this == this->prev. However, this only hold is object stay around long enough. I would suspect that they don't. The easiast way to prove this is to assert the value of prev:

A::A(A* p): prev(p) { assert(this != this->prev); }
A::A(A const& a): prev(a.prev) { assert(this != this->prev); }
A& A::operator= (A const& a) {
    this->prev = a.prev;
    assert(this != this->prev); 
}

I suspect that the original object which was referenced went away at some point and the location gets reused by an object unluckily referencing itself. You happy passing of object around combined with keeping pointer to these objects makes it a likely candidate. With you incomplete (and mostly irrelevant) code the problem can't be reproduced so I couldn't confirm if this indeed the problem.

share|improve this answer
    
If I add the object to a vector and that vector later gets cleaned up. Will that lead to the problem? –  Stackd May 13 '12 at 11:18
    
This is OK. However, if the parent gets moved around you get the problem. Did you add the copy constructor and copy assignment and tbe asserts? Running this should pin-point where you get an object pointing to itself. –  Dietmar Kühl May 13 '12 at 13:23

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