Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Explain in detail the difference, if any, between the following two versions of a Java generic class?

class C<T>{
    T x;
    void foo(T y)  { … }
}

and

class C<T>{
    T x;
    <T> void foo(T y)  { … }
}

and another question: What could be written in the body of foo(), replacing the “…” that would cause the Java compiler to accept the first version of C but reject the second version of C.

I'm very puzzled.

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted
class C<T>{
    T x;
    <T> void foo(T y)  { … }
}

is a confusing way to write

class C<T>{
    T x;
    <S> void foo(S y)  { … }
}

as for what would reject the second version, for example this:

class C<T>{
    T x;
    <T> void foo(T y)  { x = y; }
}

will fail, because if you rewrite it as

class C<T>{
    T x;
    <S> void foo(S y)  { x = y; }
}

you can immediately see that you're missing a cast (the exact compiler error is "incompatible types").

share|improve this answer
    
Very helpful. Thanks! –  eleven May 12 '12 at 22:58

In the first example, the T type variable in the method foo represents the very same type that is declared in the class definition C<T>.

The second example is a pitfall, because the T in the method declaration is a completely different type unrelated to the type parameter of the class, it just happens to have the same name T. It is a similar case to the situation when a local variable hides a field of the same name.

Eclipse emits a nice compiler warning (if this warning is turned on in the settings, not sure if it is on by default) for this situation:

The type parameter T is hiding the type T

share|improve this answer
    
Very helpful, Thanks! –  eleven May 12 '12 at 23:01

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.