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This may be a debugger issue, but here goes:

I have this piece of code:

Private Function Connect() As Boolean
    Try
        sessionBegun = False
        connectionOpen = False

        rp = New RequestProcessor2()

        rp.OpenConnection2("","EZSystem", QBXMLRPConnectionType.localQBD) 

        connectionOpen = True 
        ticket = rp.BeginSession("", QBFileMode.qbFileOpenDoNotCare)
        sessionBegun = True 

        Return True
    Catch e As COMException
        exceptionHandler.HandleConnectionException(e)
        **Throw New QuickBooksConnectionException(e.Message)**
    End Try
End Function

My intention is to 'convert' the low level exception into something more meaningful, so I throw an exception of my own creation. I want this to bubble up to a place where I can handle it.

However what is happening is my debugger breaks and tells me that an exception of type "QuickBooksConnectionException" was thrown.

I know that, I just threw it, why are you catching it?

From what I've read, this ought to work, and there doesn't appear to be an analogous Java throws keyword, so perhaps it is my debugger.

I am using SharpDevelop.

Thanks, Dane

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1  
This is just the debugger doing its job. It catches any unhandled exceptions. What are you expecting to happen? –  MarkJ May 13 '12 at 7:05
    
I was expecting it to bubble up to the caller, and then explode there. –  Danedo May 13 '12 at 12:07
    
It bubbles up the call stack looking for an enclosing Try block. If there's no enclosing Try block, then you will get the unhandled exception behaviour. Which means that if you are running under a debugger, the debugger will rewind the call stack back so it can show you the original line that threw the exception. To help you debug why the exception happened. Try running from a standalone EXE. It will terminate with a standard error dialogue. I think your code is working fine, it's just the debugger that's maybe confusing you. –  MarkJ May 13 '12 at 15:29
    
... And here are the rules that determine whether the debugger breaks on an exception msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/x85tt0dd –  MarkJ May 13 '12 at 15:39
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As written, your code throws an unhandled exception, which is always going to cause the debugger to balk. You just have to catch the QuickBooksConnectionException in the code that invokes this method. (And you're right, there's no equivalent in C# to the throws Java keyword.)

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You seem to be implying that its a bad idea to throw a custom exception like he is doing. He is not doing anything wrong. In fact, what he is doing is good practice in many ways. Just because the debugger breaks at that point to give you a chance to trace through the code and see why the exception was thrown, that doesn't mean it's bad coding practice to throw exceptions. –  Steven Doggart May 13 '12 at 10:14
    
@SteveDog I don't think I implied it was bad practice; I agree it's the correct approach to throw the exception back up the stack if you can't handle it where it's caught. –  McGarnagle May 13 '12 at 20:39
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You can change the setting for when the debugger breaks for exceptions.

See here.

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+1. And here are the rules that determine whether the debugger breaks on an exception msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/x85tt0dd –  MarkJ May 13 '12 at 15:39
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This is just the debugger doing its job. It usually catches any unhandled exceptions. I think your code is working fine, it's the debugger that's maybe confusing you.

Here's an experiment to show what's going on. Remove your Try-Catch block completely. Run the code & cause a COMException. The debugger will "catch" it, because it's unhandled, and highlight the line that throws it.

An exception bubbles up the call stack looking for an enclosing Try block. If there's no enclosing Try block, then the runtime deals with it. Which means that if you are running under a debugger, the debugger will rewind the call stack back so it can show you the original line that threw the exception. To help you debug why the exception happened. Try running from a standalone EXE or website with no debugger. It will terminate with a standard error dialogue.

Here are the rules that determine whether the debugger breaks on an exception.

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