Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I get the lowest out of 3 values in Sql Server?

The same function in MySQL called LEAST, and comparison in SQL Server?

share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

If you want to avoid nested CASE statements, this will do (although a bit awkward):

CREATE TABLE #t(ID INT, V1 INT, V2 INT, V3 INT)
INSERT INTO #t VALUES
    (1, 10, 20, 30)
    , (2, 60, 50, 40)

SELECT * FROM #t t1
CROSS APPLY (SELECT MAX(V), MIN(V) FROM (
SELECT V1 AS V
UNION SELECT V2
UNION SELECT V3 
) T) AS t2(VMAX, VMIN)

DROP TABLE #t
share|improve this answer
3  
Please use UNION ALL instead of UNION. The use of UNION will force SQL Server to use a worktable. –  Bogdan Sahlean May 13 '12 at 11:04

there is no function in SQL server similar to Least() function in mysql

the Least() function of MySQL does the following

Take two or more arguments, returns the smallest (minimum-valued) argument. The arguments are compared using the following rules:

If any argument is NULL, the result is NULL. No comparison is needed.

If the return value is used in an INTEGER context or all arguments are integer-valued, they are compared as integers.

If the return value is used in a REAL context or all arguments are real-valued, they are compared as reals.

If the arguments comprise a mix of numbers and strings, they are compared as numbers.

If any argument is a nonbinary (character) string, the arguments are compared as nonbinary strings.

In all other cases, the arguments are compared as binary strings.

The Min() function of sql server returns the smallest value of a column in a table it doesn't take arguments

here is a simulation but still its not like Least because it can only take in integers

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[GetSmallest]
(
    -- Add the parameters for the function here
    @val1 int,  @val2 int,  @val3 int
)
RETURNS int
AS
BEGIN
Declare @result int
set @result = case when @val1 < @val2 then
               case when @val1 < @val3 then 
                @val1
               else
                @val3
               end
        when @val2 < @val3 then 
                @val2
        else
                 @val3
    end
  return @result  
END 

here is how you call it

SELECT [dbo].[GetSmallest] (   32  ,31  ,6)
share|improve this answer

And the obvious nested case statement would be:

select case when val1 < val2 then
               case when val1 < val3 then val1
               else val3
               end
        when val2 < val3 then val2
               else val3
    end
from cols;

on

create table cols (val1 int, val2 int, val3 int);

It's not going to scale very easily to higher # of comparisons, and it doesn't include coalesce statements to suppress nulls.

The singular advantage is that another programmer will be able to figure it out quickly when they look at your code. (And unless this is a performance bottleneck, I think that's a pretty good consideration!)

share|improve this answer
    
Personally speaking, if I was the other programmer, I would much rather read a useful comment that tells me what the code does, instead of having to "figure out" a nested CASE statement (even 'simple' ones can be unclear if you don't know the intention). –  Pondlife May 13 '12 at 8:33
    
@Pondlife I often work with legacy codebases. I can't tell you how many times I've found code that was changed w/o changing the comments. The older the codebase, the less I trust the comments. Thus, the less comments to explain something the better. YMMV –  Mike Ryan May 13 '12 at 14:12

You can do this without a nested case:

select (case when val1 < val2 and val1 < val3 then val1
             when val2 < val3 then val2
             else val3
        end) as least_of_three

This seems pretty clear as to what it is doing. It also generalizes pretty easily.

Do be careful about NULLs -- which LEAST and GREATEST ignore. If you need to handle these, then it is a bit more cumbersome:

select (case when val1 <= coalesce(val2, val1) and val1 <= coalesce(val3, val1) then val1
             when val2 <= coalesce(val3, val2) then val2
             else val3
        end) as least_of_three

Notice I've changed the "<" to "<=". I use the coalesce to "ignore" the value by evaluating to true. So, val1 is always less than val2, if val2 is null. I've chosen this method because it works for all data types (strings, numbers, dates).

share|improve this answer

You can use the "Min" function in T-SQL:

SELECT MIN(Value) FROM MyTable
share|improve this answer
1  
he's asking about across columns. GREATEST and LEAST functions –  Michael Buen May 13 '12 at 6:30
    

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.