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Got this as an interview question from Amazon to test basic SQL skills and I kind of flopped it. Consider the following tables:

Student - Stid, Stname, Details
Subject - Subid, Subname
Marks - Stid, Subid, mark

Write a query to print the list of names of students who have scored the maximum mark in each subject.

The wrong answer which I gave was:

select A.Stname from A as Student, B as 
(select Stid, Subid, max(mark) from Marks groupby Subid) where A.Stid = B.Stid

I was thinking you can have a table B in which you can get the top marks alone and match it with the names in the student table A. But turns out my "groupby" is wrong.

One more variation of the question which I felt was can be asked is that, if there is more than one student having the highest mark in a subject, even their names should be included.

Can you please help solve these queries. They seem to be simple, but I am not able to get a hang of it.

Thanks!

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I am not able to tag it as Amazon-interview question or interview-question as both seem to be a "DO-NOT-USE" tags for some clean-up process in StackOverflow. @Mods: Feel free to edit if any inconsistencies in question or tagging. I will delete this comment once rectified. Thanks. –  Maverickgugu May 13 '12 at 7:21
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5 Answers

You just have to partition the problem into some bite-sized steps and solve each one by one

First, get the maximum score in each subject:

select SubjectID, max(MarkRate)
from Mark
group by SubjectID;

Then query who are those that has SubjectID with max MarkRate:

select SubjectID, MarkRate, StudentID
from Mark
where (SubjectID,MarkRate)
in
  (
  select SubjectID, max(MarkRate)
  from Mark
  group by SubjectID
  )
order by SubjectID, StudentID;

Then obtain the Student's name, instead of displaying just the StudentID:

select SubjectName, MarkRate, StudentName
from Mark
join Student using(StudentID)
join Subject using(SubjectID)
where (SubjectID,MarkRate)
in
  (
  select SubjectID, max(MarkRate)
  from Mark
  group by SubjectID
  )
order by SubjectName, StudentName

Database vendors' artificial differences aside with regards to joining and correlating results, the basic step is the same; first, partition the problem in a bite-sized parts, and then integrate them as you solved each one of them, so it won't be as confusing.


Sample data:

CREATE TABLE Student
    (StudentID int, StudentName varchar(6), Details varchar(1));    
INSERT INTO Student
    (StudentID, StudentName, Details)
VALUES
    (1, 'John', 'X'),
    (2, 'Paul', 'X'),
    (3, 'George', 'X'),
    (4, 'Paul', 'X');

CREATE TABLE Subject
    (SubjectID varchar(1), SubjectName varchar(7));    
INSERT INTO Subject
    (SubjectID, SubjectName)
VALUES
    ('M', 'Math'),
    ('E', 'English'),
    ('H', 'History');

CREATE TABLE Mark
    (StudentID int, SubjectID varchar(1), MarkRate int);    
INSERT INTO Mark
    (StudentID, SubjectID, MarkRate)
VALUES
    (1, 'M', 90),
    (1, 'E', 100),
    (2, 'M', 95),
    (2, 'E', 70),
    (3, 'E', 95),
    (3, 'H', 98),
    (4, 'H', 90),
    (4, 'E', 100);

Live test here: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!1/08728/3


IN tuple test is still a join by any other name:

Convert this..

select SubjectName, MarkRate, StudentName
from Mark
join Student using(StudentID)
join Subject using(SubjectID)

where (SubjectID,MarkRate)
in
  (
  select SubjectID, max(MarkRate)
  from Mark
  group by SubjectID
  )

order by SubjectName, StudentName

..to JOIN:

select SubjectName, MarkRate, StudentName
from Mark
join Student using(StudentID)
join Subject using(SubjectID)

join
  (
  select SubjectID, max(MarkRate) as MarkRate
  from Mark
  group by SubjectID
  ) as x using(SubjectID,MarkRate)

order by SubjectName, StudentName

Contrast this code with the code immediate it. See how JOIN on independent query look like an IN construct? They almost look the same, and IN was just replaced with JOIN keyword; and the replaced IN keyword with JOIN is in fact longer, you need to alias the independent query's column result(max(MarkRate) AS MarkRate) and also the subquery itself (as x). Anyway, this are just matter of style, I prefer IN clause, as the intent is clearer. Using JOINs merely to reflect the data relationship.

Anyway, here's the query that works on all databases that doesn't support tuple test(IN):

select sb.SubjectName, m.MarkRate, st.StudentName
from Mark as m
join Student as st on st.StudentID = m.StudentID
join Subject as sb on sb.SubjectID = m.SubjectID

join
  (
  select SubjectID, max(MarkRate) as MaxMarkRate
  from Mark
  group by SubjectID
  ) as x on m.SubjectID = x.SubjectID AND m.MarkRate = x.MaxMarkRate

order by sb.SubjectName, st.StudentName

Live test: http://www.sqlfiddle.com/#!1/08728/4

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My attempt - I'd start with the max mark and build from there

Schema:

CREATE TABLE Student (
  StudentId int,
  Name nvarchar(30),
  Details nvarchar(30)
)
CREATE TABLE Subject (
  SubjectId int,
  Name nvarchar(30)
)
CREATE TABLE Marks (
  StudentId int,
  SubjectId int,
  Mark int
)

Data:

INSERT INTO Student (StudentId, Name, Details) 
VALUES (1,'Alfred','AA'), (2,'Betty','BB'), (3,'Chris','CC')

INSERT INTO Subject (SubjectId, Name)
VALUES (1,'Maths'), (2, 'Science'), (3, 'English')

INSERT INTO Marks (StudentId, SubjectId, Mark)
VALUES 
(1,1,61),(1,2,75),(1,3,87),
(2,1,82),(2,2,64),(2,3,77),
(3,1,82),(3,2,83),(3,3,67)
GO

My query would have been:

;WITH MaxMarks AS (
  SELECT SubjectId, MAX(Mark) as MaxMark
    FROM Marks
    GROUP BY SubjectId
 )
SELECT s.Name as [StudentName], sub.Name AS [SubjectName],m.Mark
FROM MaxMarks mm
INNER JOIN Marks m 
ON m.SubjectId = mm.SubjectId 
AND m.Mark = mm.MaxMark
INNER JOIN Student s
ON s.StudentId = m.StudentId
INNER JOIN Subject sub
ON sub.SubjectId = mm.SubjectId

SQL Fiddle Example

  1. Find the max mark for each subject
  2. Join Marks, Student and Subject to find the relevant details of that highest mark

This also take care of duplicate students with the highest mark

Results:

STUDENTNAME SUBJECTNAME     MARK
Alfred  English     87
Betty   Maths           82
Chris   Maths           82
Chris   Science     83
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I would have said:

select s.stname, s2.subname, highmarks.mark
from students s
join marks m on s.stid = m.stid
join Subject s2 on m.subid = s2.subid
join (select subid, max(mark) as mark
  from marks group by subid) as highmarks
    on highmarks.subid = m.subid and highmarks.mark = m.mark
order by subname, stname;

SQLFiddle here: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/5ef84/3

This is a:

  • select on the students table to get the possible students
  • a join to the marks table to match up students to marks,
  • a join to the subjects table to resolve subject ids into names.
  • a join to a derived table of the maximum marks in each subject.

Only the students that get maximum marks will meet all three join conditions. This lists all students who got that maximum mark, so if there are ties, both get listed.

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Thanks @Ryan. This query is pretty concise and nice.. but, may I know whether the third condition where you join the subjects table to resolve it to their names is just to print the subject name in the output? –  Maverickgugu May 13 '12 at 8:40
    
And one more doubt, is why the "order by".. Did you add that with any motive? Because, I am getting the same output. –  Maverickgugu May 13 '12 at 8:51
    
Both are to make the result more readable. You don't actually say whether or not you want to resolve the subid's to the subject names. But since the table is supplied, and you have to display either the subid or the subname, I took it as implied. And the order by is to make the output nice. (Usually the case w/ order by.) In any real situation I'd ask. –  Mike Ryan May 13 '12 at 14:08
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I like the simple solution using windows functions:

select t.*
from (select student.*, su.subname, max(mark) over (partition by subid) as maxmark
      from marks m join
           students st
           on m.stid = st.stid join
           subject su
           on m.subid = su.subid
     ) t
where t.mark = maxmark

Or, alternatively:

select t.*
from (select student.*, su.subname, rank(mark) over (partition by subid order by mark desc) as markseqnum
      from marks m join
           students st
           on m.stid = st.stid join
           subject su
           on m.subid = su.subid
     ) t
where markseqnum = 1
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Just for fun, consider the different question one would get with a very literal interpretation of the OP's description: "Write a query to print the list of names of students who have scored the maximum mark in each subject."

Those who've answered here have written queries to list a student if he or she scored the maximum mark in any one subject, but not necessarily in all subjects. Since the question posed by the OP does not ask for subject names in the output, this is a plausible interpretation.

To list the names of students (if any) who have scored the maximum mark in all subjects (excluding subjects with no marks, since arguably there is then no maximum mark then), I think this works, using column names from Michael's SQL Fiddle, which I've adapted here.

select StudentName
from Student 
where not exists (
  select * from Subject
  where exists (
    select * from Mark as M1
    where M1.SubjectID = Subject.SubjectID
    and M1.StudentID <> Student.StudentID
    and not exists (
      select * from Mark as M2
      where M2.StudentID = Student.StudentID
      and M2.SubjectID = M1.SubjectID
      and M2.MarkRate >= M1.MarkRate
    )
  )
)

In other words, select a student X's name if there is no subject in which someone's mark for that subject is not matched or exceeded by some mark belonging to X for the same subject. (This query returns a student's name if the student has received more than one mark in a subject, so long as one of those marks is the highest for the subject.)

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