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This is how i calculated the digital root of an integer.


import acm.program.*;

public class Problem7 extends ConsoleProgram
{
    public void run()
    {
        println("This program calculates the digital root of an interger.");

        int num = readInt("Enter the number: ");
        int sum = 0;
        while (true)
        {
            if (num > 0)
            {
                int dsum = num % 10;
                num /= 10;
                sum += dsum;
            }
            else if (sum > 9)
            {
                int dsum = sum % 10;
                sum /= 10;
                sum += dsum;

            } else if (sum <= 9 ) break;
        }
        println("Digital Root is: " + sum);
    }


The program works fine.

Is there a better/shorter way of calculating the digital root of a number. ?


EDIT/ADDED : Here is the implementation of the above problem by using Tyler's answer, it works as well:


import acm.program.*;

public class Problem7 extends ConsoleProgram
{
    public void run()
    {
        println("This program calculates the digital root of an interger.");

        int num = readInt("Enter the number: ");
        println("Digital Root of " + num + " is: " + (1 + (num - 1) % 9));
    }
}


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4 Answers 4

up vote 6 down vote accepted
#include <stdio.h>

int main(void)
{
   int number;
   scanf("%d", &number);

   printf("The digital root of %d is %d.", number, (1 + (number - 1) % 9));
}

Had I not been able to find Ramans' formula this is how I would write this program...:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <ctype.h>

int main(void)
{
    int c;
    int number = 0;
    while ((c = getchar()) != EOF)
    {
    	if (isdigit(c))
    		number += (c - '0');
    }
    if (number <= 9)
    {
    	printf("The digital root is %d\n", number);
    }
    else
    {
    	printf("%d", number);
    }

}

After compiling, to run this, basically you just chain these together. I believe four is the most you could possibly need for an integer.

$ echo 829382938 | ./digitalroot | ./digitalroot | ./digitalroot | ./digitalroot
share|improve this answer
    
When i searched google, i did find this (1 + (number - 1) % 9). Ill give it a try. –  Ibn Saeed Jun 29 '09 at 8:12
    
For homework, you are going to have to proof/explain that magic formula, though. –  Thilo Jun 29 '09 at 8:13
    
This works great, but how do people come out with such algos ? –  Ibn Saeed Jun 29 '09 at 8:14
2  
This formula resides at the bottom of the page: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Digital_root It's quite brilliant. –  Tyler Jun 29 '09 at 8:15
1  
When writing real code, you should always use well-established algorithms where applicable. No need to re-invent the wheel. However, for homework, they are probably trying to teach you how the wheel works, so you should try to figure the algorithm out yourself. This way, you will learn more, and be able to appreciate the cleverness contained in something like Ramans' formula even more. –  Thilo Jun 29 '09 at 8:39

Personally, I do not like your loop, which is essentially two loops (first going over the original digits, then going over the digits of sum) mashed into one. How about a sprinkling of recursion:

private int sumDigits(int in){
   if (i>10)
      return in%10 + sumDigits(in/10);
    return in;
}

private int digitalRoot(int in){
    assert (in > 0) ;
    while (in > 9)  in=sumDigits(in);
    return in;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but I am still a beginner in Java Programming, I haven't yet learned Recursion –  Ibn Saeed Jun 29 '09 at 8:10
    
Teachers love recursion... –  Thilo Jun 29 '09 at 8:12
    
the recursion chapter is the last one in my book and sadly the teacher wont teach it. I'll have to go through it myself. –  Ibn Saeed Jun 29 '09 at 8:23

I think I am at the same point in the class, no recursion or any moderately advanced ideas (I'm a super beginner). I used

public void run() {
    println("This program finds the digital root of an integer.");
    int n = readInt("Enter a positive integer: ");
    int dsum = 0;
        while (n>0) {
            dsum += n % 10;
            n /= 10;
            if ((n==0) && (dsum>9)) {
                n = dsum;
                dsum = 0;
            }   
        }
    println("The digital root of the integer is " + dsum);
}
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I would take the input in as a String instead. This way, you can simply loop through the String and use Integer.parseInt() to grab each number and add them. You can convert that number again to a String and loop through the code to obtain your digital root.

public void run()
{
    println("This program calculates the digital root of an interger.");

    String num = readLine("Enter the number: ");
    int sum = 10;
    while (num > 9) {
      for (int x = 0; x < num.length(); x++) {
         sum = Integer.parseInt(num.charAt(x));
      }
      num = Integer.toString(sum);
   }
   println("Digital Root is: " + sum);
}
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