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Below is a cut down version of a grammar that is parsing an input assembly file. Everything in my grammar is fine until i use labels that have 3 characters (i.e. same length as an OPCODE in my grammar), so I'm assuming Antlr is matching it as an OPCODE rather than a LABEL, but how do I say "in this position, it should be a LABEL, not an OPCODE"?

Trial input:

set a, label1
set b, abc

Output from a standard rig gives:

line 2:5 missing EOF at ','
(OP_BAS set a (REF label1)) (OP_SPE set b)

When I step debug through ANTLRWorks, I see it start down instruction rule 2, but at the reference to "abc" jumps to rule 3 and then fail at the ",".

I can solve this with massive left factoring, but it makes the grammar incredibly unreadable. I'm trying to find a compromise (there isn't so much input that the global backtrack is a hit on performance) between readability and functionality.

grammar TestLabel;

options {
    language = Java;
    output = AST;
    ASTLabelType = CommonTree;
    backtrack = true;
}

tokens {
    NEGATION;
    OP_BAS;
    OP_SPE;
    OP_CMD;
    REF;
    DEF;
}

program
    : instruction* EOF!
    ;

instruction
    : LABELDEF                  -> ^(DEF LABELDEF)
    | OPCODE dst_op ',' src_op  -> ^(OP_BAS OPCODE dst_op src_op)
    | OPCODE src_op             -> ^(OP_SPE OPCODE src_op)
    | OPCODE                    -> ^(OP_CMD OPCODE)
    ;

operand
    : REG
    | LABEL                     -> ^(REF LABEL)
    | expr
    ;

dst_op
    : PUSH
    | operand
    ;

src_op
    : POP
    | operand
    ;

term
    : '('! expr ')'!
    | literal
    ;

unary
    : ('+'! | negation^ )* term
    ;

negation
    : '-' -> NEGATION
    ;

mult
    : unary ( ( '*'^ | '/'^ ) unary )*
    ;

expr
    :  mult ( ( '+'^ | '-'^ ) mult )*
    ;

literal
    :   number
    |   CHAR
    ;

number
    :   HEX
    |   BIN
    |   DECIMAL
    ;

REG: ('A'..'C'|'I'..'J'|'X'..'Z'|'a'..'c'|'i'..'j'|'x'..'z') ;
OPCODE: LETTER LETTER LETTER;

HEX: '0x' ( 'a'..'f' | 'A'..'F' | DIGIT )+ ;
BIN: '0b' ('0'|'1')+;
DECIMAL: DIGIT+ ;

LABEL: ( '.' | LETTER | DIGIT | '_' )+ ;
LABELDEF: ':' ( '.' | LETTER | DIGIT | '_' )+ {setText(getText().substring(1));} ;

STRING: '\"' .* '\"' {setText(getText().substring(1, getText().length()-1));} ;
CHAR: '\'' . '\'' {setText(getText().substring(1, 2));} ;
WS: (' ' | '\n' | '\r' | '\t' | '\f')+ { $channel = HIDDEN; } ;

fragment LETTER: ('a'..'z'|'A'..'Z') ;
fragment DIGIT: '0'..'9' ;
fragment PUSH: ('P'|'p')('U'|'u')('S'|'s')('H'|'h');
fragment POP: ('P'|'p')('O'|'o')('P'|'p');
share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

The parser has no influence on what tokens the lexer produces. So, the input "abc" will always be tokenized as a OPCODE, no matter what the parser tries to match.

What you can do is create a label parser rules that matches either a LABEL or OPCODE and then use this label rule in your operand rule:

label
 : LABEL
 | OPCODE
 ;

operand
 : REG
 | label -> ^(REF label)
 | expr
 ;

resulting in the following AST for your example input:

enter image description here

This will only match OPCODE, but will not change the type of the token. If you want the type to be changed as well, add a bit of custom code to the rule that changes it to type LABEL:

label
 : LABEL
 | t=OPCODE {$t.setType(LABEL);}
 ;
share|improve this answer
    
Excellent again Bart, thanks. I do actually want to know when I'm hitting a register different to a reference, so I've not used a fragment on it. As I wrote the question, I thought about creating a rule like you've suggested, but it feels like it's a fix to get around the fact that the parser is already deciding that 3 letter strings must always be OPCODE. I like your addition to the custom code, I've not seen that before, so very useful. Thanks again. – Mark Fisher May 13 '12 at 11:35
    
No problem @MarkFisher. – Bart Kiers May 13 '12 at 11:37

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