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I read in Kathy Sierra book that when we create String using new operator like String s = new String("abc") In this case, because we used the new keyword, Java will create a new String object in normal (nonpool) memory, and s will refer to it. In addition, literal "abc" will be placed in the pool.

intern() says that if String pool already contains a string then the string from the pool is returned Otherwise, the String object is added to the pool and a reference to this String object is returned.

If string "abc" when created using new also placed the string in the pool, then wht does intern() says that string from the pool is returned if String pool contains the string otherwise the string object is added to the pool.

Also I want to know if we create a String using new then actually how many objects get created?

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1 Answer 1

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TL;DR: If you ever really need to do new String("abc"), you'll know you need to and you'll know why. It's so rare that it's almost valid to say you never need to. Just use "abc".


The long version:

When you do new String("abc") the following happens:

  • When the class containing that code is loaded, if a string with the characters "abc" is not already in the intern pool, it's created and put there.
  • When the new String("abc") code is run:
    • A reference to the "abc" string from the intern pool is passed into the String constructor.
    • A new String object is created and initialized by copying the characters from the String passed into the constructor.
    • The new String object is returned to you.

If string "abc" when created using new also placed the string in the pool, then why does intern() says that string from the pool is returned if String pool contains the string otherwise the string object is added to the pool.

Because that's what intern does. Note that calling intern on a string literal is a no-op; string literals are all interned automatically. E.g.:

String s1 = "abc";               // Get a reference to the string defined by the literal
String s2 = s1.intern();         // No-op
System.out.println(s1 == s2);    // "true"
System.out.println(s1 == "abc"); // "true", all literals are interned automatically

Also I want to know if we create a String using new then actually how many objects get created?

You create at least one String object (the new, non-interned one), and possibly two (if the literal wasn't already in the pool; but again, that bit happens earlier, when the class file's literals are loaded):

String s1 = "abc";            // Get a reference to the string defined by the literal
String s2 = new String(s1);   // Create a new `String` object (guaranteed)
System.out.println(s1 == s2); // "false"
String s3 = s2.intern();      // Get the interned version of the string with these characters
System.out.println(s1 == s3); // "true"
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"If a string with the characters "abc" is not already in the intern pool, it's created and put there." - Quibble : this happens at class load time; i.e. before class initialization, and long before the new String("abc") statement is executed. –  Stephen C May 13 '12 at 11:11
    
so after we intern the new String object, what happens to the object created in heap using new? –  Anand May 13 '12 at 11:12
    
@anand: (All of these are in the heap.) If you intern the new string object, then assuming there are no other outstanding references to it, it's eligible for garbage collection, just like any other object that no longer has outstanding references to it. intern returns the reference to the interned String. –  T.J. Crowder May 13 '12 at 11:16
    
@T.J.Crowder - well yes, but earlier you say that it happens at the point when the new is executed. You shouldn't say one thing and then immediately contradict yourself. It makes your explanation hard to understand. –  Stephen C May 13 '12 at 12:18
    
@anand - in this particular case, the code object for the class/method your are running will contain a reference to the intern'd String. This means that the String that represents "abc" will remain reachable as long as the class remains loaded. –  Stephen C May 13 '12 at 12:27

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