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I want to customize the print statement in Python for additional text. But with my approach, it seems that the Enter key is getting buffered in the input.

The program I used is:

class rename_print:
    def __init__(self, stdout):
        self.stdout = stdout     
    def write(self, text):
        self.stdout.write('###' + text)     
        self.stdout.flush()
    def close(self):
        self.stdout.close()

import sys

prints = rename_print(sys.stdout)
sys.stdout = prints
print 'abc'

The output I get is

###abc###

The output I expected is

###abc

What might be the reason of this? I doubt that input stream is getting buffered with the Enter key. How can I solve this issue?

share|improve this question
    
You never showed us the printing code, so we have no idea what the bug can be. – orlp May 13 '12 at 12:59
    
sorry for the miss..edited the code accordingly.. – Rilwan May 13 '12 at 13:04
    
I think what is happening is that print implicitly adds a newline. This extra print is also calling your redirected write function so you get another "###\n" – Jason Morgan May 13 '12 at 13:15
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think what is happening is that print implicitly adds a newline. This extra print is also calling your redirected write function so you get another "###\n"

It's a bit hacky, but try this:

...

def write(self, text):
    if text!="\n":
       self.stdout.write('###' + text)

...

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot guys.i was trying to remove the '\n' from buffer .anyway this works.. – Rilwan May 13 '12 at 13:44
    
this fails when there are two print statements.We have to handle that also. – Rilwan May 13 '12 at 17:50

print writes a newline character to the output stream per default (or a space between each argument). so you get two calls to write, one with "abc" and one with "\n".

so if you don't want that behaviour, you have to treat that calls separately.

share|improve this answer

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