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First off, this is my first C project (and one of my first programming projects in any language), so if my syntax looks strange or I do some strange stuff I apologize.

I have a program that uses three input files. Each file contains a few numbers: some are integers and some are floats. I've managed to check if the files exist, but not the other stuff. If any of these requirements are not met the program should end and display an error message accordingly. I've seen questions asking one one of these things, but not all of them combined. The answers I have seen also require quit a bit of space. I was hoping to get this done with as few lines as possible. Help is much appreciated.

One of the scripts I've been working on can be seen below. It gives an error message if the input file is not there, but I have removed my attempts at checking for int vs. float and if they are within range.


#include "header.h"
void visualreader(int *x_range, int *y_range, int *z_range,
                  int *x_cells, int *y_cells, int *z_cells, int *time) {

  // Scans the input file containing parameters for visualizing
  // the velocity vector field
  FILE *fp = fopen("visual_input.dat", "r");

  if (fp) {
    fscanf(fp, "%d %d %d\n", x_range, y_range, z_range);
    fscanf(fp, "%d %d %d\n", x_cells, y_cells, z_cells);
    fscanf(fp, "%d\n", time);
    fclose (fp);
  } else {
    perror("error opening the file" );
  }
}
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1  
"How do I check whether a file exists?" and "How do I tell whether the contents are in range?" are two completely separate unrelated questions. Please edit your question to focus on one issue or the other. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 13 '12 at 14:37
    
Don't remove what you've tried so far, show it. Don't be shy ... ;-) –  alk May 13 '12 at 14:42

5 Answers 5

check if an input file exist

fopen() will return NULL if it fails, so your conditional with fp is the right way to do that.

if the numbers in the file are int or float

You'll have to read the values in as a string and then manually check for a . in the string. Honestly, if the values can ever be floats, then just assume they're always floats and read them in as such. No good will come of complicating your program to optimize for ints at this stage.

if they are within a range

For each value that's been read in (as a float), just manually check, like:

if (x_range < minimum_value || x_range > maximum_value) {
  error_routine(...);
}
share|improve this answer
    
If fopen() returns NULL this does not necessarily mean the file does not exist, but simply the file can not be opened the way (mode) requested, by the process doing the request. Access rights could spoil the game. –  alk May 13 '12 at 14:45
    
@alk What I said in my statement is entirely correct. If fopen() fails, it will return NULL. The OP already has perror(), so he'll know the reason at runtime. –  chrisaycock May 13 '12 at 14:51
    
It wasn't my intention to negate your statement. I just wanted to precise the implicit impression that fopen() returning NULL would mean the file in question would not exist. –  alk May 13 '12 at 14:59

To check if a file exist in plain C you can use access function in unistd.h like this :

if( access( "visual_input.dat", F_OK ) != -1 ) {
    // file exists
} 
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2  
I would add that by using access you open up for a race condition, where the file doesn't exist when you use access, but is created before you call fopen or vice versa. Even if using access, be sure to check the return value of fopen. –  dnaq May 13 '12 at 15:21
1  
"plain C" and "unistd.h" are contradictory. That is OS specific. –  Clifford May 13 '12 at 17:49
    
With plain C i meant not C++, sorry for the ambiguity . –  aleroot May 13 '12 at 18:04

Testing for the existance of a file is OS specific. However using just standard library calls, When fopen() fails errno is set; the vallue is OS specific, but you can use use perror() to output a meaningful message.

Since you are using fscanf() that implies that the values are ASCII representations of numeric values rather than binary values. If you interpret all values as floating point, by using the %f format specifier, that will correctly interpret both real and integer decimal representations. That would be easier than attempting to determine by inspection whether a number was intended to be an integer or not.

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Here is a sample that will detect if a file exists.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>

int main(){
    FILE *fp;
    errno = 0;
    fp=fopen("Not_exist.txt","r");
    if(fp == NULL && errno == ENOENT)
        perror("file does not exist");
    else
        fclose(fp);

    return 0;
}
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@octopusgrabbus - Thank you for always. –  BLUEPIXY Jul 15 '12 at 23:34

The following sample is a main program, but could easily be a library function. It does not print anything but instead returns a value, in case it is turned into a library function.

To test this program -- I'm using Ubuntu 10.04 -- I simply echo $? when the program is complete, so see the error code. 0 is success, and non-zero is failure.

I added an fclose if the file open succeeded. It is bad practice to open a file and not close it.

I have included both a check of errno's and fp's value. I did check the C fopen documentation, and all you really need to check is fp's value for NULL or not. Hence, I used ||, instead of &&.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <errno.h>

#define MIN_ARGS_SUPPLIED 2

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    FILE *fp;
    int rc = 0;

    if(MIN_ARGS_SUPPLIED != argc)
    {
       printf("Usage: file_detect file-name\n");
       rc = -1;
    }
    else
    {
        errno = 0; /* errno is already declared by including errno.h */

        fp=fopen(argv[1],"r");

        if(fp == NULL || errno == ENOENT)
        {
           rc = errno; 
        }
        else
        {
            fclose(fp);
        }
    }

    return rc;
}
share|improve this answer
    
If someone more familiar with C than I wants to comment on checking for file open status, I will happily edit this answer's example to leave out checking errno. I used OR more for an example than as the way I would actually code this. –  octopusgrabbus Jul 15 '12 at 21:52

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