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C++ has a very handy switch statement, but I don't know if this is possible is java

switch(num)
{
   case 1 ... 9:
     do something
     break
   case 10 ... 19:
     do something
     break
   default: something
}

is this possible in java, I've tried, but it doesn't work, at least not like c++, is there an equivalent for this?

thanks

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7  
This doesn't work in C++ either. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 13 '12 at 15:54
    
Read up on Java's 'switch' statement. docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/nutsandbolts/switch.html –  Tony Ennis May 13 '12 at 15:54
    
@Oli What do you bet that some compiler supports this as an extension to the language? –  Donal Fellows May 13 '12 at 15:58
2  
@DonalFellows: Very highly; this is a GCC extension! Nevertheless, it's not real C++. –  Oliver Charlesworth May 13 '12 at 15:59
    
@OliCharlesworth - I didn't know GCC had this extension and even though I do now I most likely still won't be using it :) –  Flexo May 13 '12 at 20:54

7 Answers 7

Java's switch statement requires you to explicitly list all values that you match (except for the default: clause, of course). If you're doing substantial ranges, it is probably better to use a chain of ifs:

if (num >= 1 && num <= 9) {
    do_something_A
} else if (num >= 10 && num <= 19) {
    do_something_B
} else {
    do_something_C
}

If your real num has side effects (or is plain expensive to compute), evaluate it once and save it to a local variable, then use that local in the chain of tests.

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yeah, but that's it's not swtch statement and requires lots more writing though... I know it does the same thing, but still it would be nice –  miatech May 13 '12 at 16:30
    
@miatech Well, Java doesn't do switch-on-range so you make do with what you've got. (It's a pretty much mechanical transform, so it's not that hard to do. Refactor the range test into its own function… err… private static method if it helps you do it accurately.) If you're really keen, you could always start a JSR on adding this, but it's pretty low on most people's radar to be honest. –  Donal Fellows May 14 '12 at 12:32

No, it's not possible. Probably the most straightforward equivalent is:

if (num >= 1 && num <= 9)
  doSomething();
else if (num >= 10 && num <= 19)
  doSomethingElse();
else
  doDefault();

Marginal cleanup could be defining an inRange utility function and using it inside the if statements:

boolean inRange(int num, int min, int max) {
    return num >= min && num <= max;
}

...

if (inRange(num, 1, 9))
  doSomething();
else if (inRange(num, 10, 19))
  doSomethingElse();
else
  doDefault();
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Java have switch statement, but you have to use it in this way :

switch(num)
{
   case 1:
   case 2:
   case 3:
   case 4:
     //And so far with cases 
     //do something
     break
   case 10:
   case 11:
   case 12:
     //And so far ...
     //do something
     break
   default: something
}
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could you imagine when you get to 1000 range?... –  miatech May 13 '12 at 16:29
1  
Java doesn't support range, i could NOT imagine because i never experienced a similar things ... Use polymorphism instead of huge if blocks or switch block ... –  aleroot May 13 '12 at 16:31

Yes, there is a switch statement in Java. It is in fact quite similar to switch in C++.

However, neither C++ nor Java support ranges in case labels.

For the specific example that you present I would use a series of if statements:

if (num >= 1 && num <= 9) {
  ...
} else if (num >= 10 && num <= 19) {
  ...
} else {
  ...
}
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No Java does not, in a situation like this it would be much more practical to use a series of if-else statements. :)

    if(num >= 1 && num < 10) {
        //do something
    } else if(num >= 10 && num < 20) {
        //do something
    } else {
        //do something
    }
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The feature you are talking about doesn't really belong to C++, it is a language extension which is present, for example, in GCC. But normally in C++ ranges are checked using if...else, and the same technique should be used in Java:

if (num >= 1 && num <= 9) {
    //Do something
} else if (num >= 10 && num <= 19) {
    //Do something else
} else {
    //Do something by default
}
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No, ranges are not allowed you would need to use an if else structure.

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