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Given strings like these:

string s1 = "Abc";
string s2 = "ABC";

What is faster:

Regex.Match(s1, s2, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase)

or

s1.ToLower() == s2.ToLower()

If they are the same or the one is faster then the other, so when its better to use one over the other?

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Normal string operations are faster than regular expressions generally. –  fardjad May 13 '12 at 16:02
1  
Regex.Match is highly incorrect. It is not a viable solution anyway. A regex is not a string - it is a regex pattern. –  usr May 13 '12 at 16:14
    
@fardjad, why regex generally slower? –  theateist May 13 '12 at 16:16

7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Probably the second is faster, but I'd avoid both those approaches.

Better is to use the method string.Equals with the appropriate StringComparison argument:

s1.Equals(s2, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase)

See it working online: ideone

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+1, also consider the case where s2 is an invalid regular expression. –  user7116 May 15 '12 at 1:49

Theoretically speaking, comparing 2 strings should be faster, RegEx are know to be rather slow.

However, if you want to match a string s1 to a RegEx s2 while ignoring case (This is not the same as comparing 2 strings), then the first solution is better as it should avoid creating another string.

As always with this kind of questions, I would run a benchmark and compare both performances :)

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1  
I would +1 for pointing out that a benchmark is the best way to answer these questions, but I am out of votes for today! –  Andrew Barber May 13 '12 at 16:07

It should be noted that Regex.Match(s1, s2, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase) is not a safe way to check for case-insensitive equality in the general case. Consider the case where s2 is ".*". Regex.Match will always return true no matter what s1 is!

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+1, who knows what horrible regex they've stuffed in s2. –  user7116 May 15 '12 at 1:49

@Mark Byers has already posted the right answer.

I want to stress that you should never use ToLower for string comparison. It is incorrect.

s1.Equals(s2, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase) //#1
s1.ToLower() == s2.ToLower() //#2
s1.ToLowerInvariant() == s2.ToLowerInvariant() //#3

(2) and (3) are both incorrect when it comes to exotic languages and strange characters. The Turkish "I" is the classical example.

Always use #1, even in Hashtables

(except for very special circumstances)

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This may be the most extreme case of premature optimization I've ever seen. Trust me, you will never run into a situation where this issue will be relevant.

And don't listen to all those people who tell you to avoid regexes because "they're slow". Badly written regexes can indeed hog resources something awful, but that's the fault of whoever wrote the regex. Reasonably well-crafted regexes are plenty fast enough for the vast majority of tasks people apply them to.

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Here is a small comparison of the 3 methods proposed:

Regex: 282ms ToLower: 67ms Equals: 34ms

public static void RunSnippet()
{
    string s1 = "Abc";
    string s2 = "ABC";

    // Preload
    compareUsingRegex(s1, s2);
    compareUsingToLower(s1, s2);
    compareUsingEquals(s1, s2);

    // Regex
    Stopwatch swRegex = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    for (int i = 0; i < 300000; i++) 
        compareUsingRegex(s1, s2);
    Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Regex: {0} ms", swRegex.ElapsedMilliseconds));

    // ToLower
    Stopwatch swToLower = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    for (int i = 0; i < 300000; i++) 
        compareUsingToLower(s1, s2);
    Console.WriteLine(string.Format("ToLower: {0} ms", swToLower.ElapsedMilliseconds));

    // ToLower
    Stopwatch swEquals = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    for (int i = 0; i < 300000; i++) 
        compareUsingEquals(s1, s2);
    Console.WriteLine(string.Format("Equals: {0} ms", swEquals.ElapsedMilliseconds));
}

private static bool compareUsingRegex(string s1, string s2) 
{
    return Regex.IsMatch(s1, s2, RegexOptions.IgnoreCase);
}

private static bool compareUsingToLower(string s1, string s2) 
{
    return s1.ToLower() == s2.ToLower();
}

private static bool compareUsingEquals(string s1, string s2) 
{
    return s1.Equals(s2, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase);
}
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That's not a fair comparison. I tried creating the Regex object ahead of time and storing it in a static variable, then calling IsMatch() on that, with this result: Regex: 71ms, ToLower: 51 ms, Equals: 23 ms. –  Alan Moore May 13 '12 at 22:46
    
It's also not a useful comparison because of the case where s2 contains an actual regular expression. –  user7116 May 15 '12 at 1:51
    
Requirement was to make a string comparison with ignore case. You can of course make several optimizations if you say that s1 will never change (in this case you can compile/keep the regexp object) –  Fabske May 15 '12 at 7:26

Comparing will be faster but Instead of converting to lower or upper case and then comparing, its better to use an equality comparison which can be made case-insensitive. E.g. :

        s1.Equals(s2, StringComparison.OrdinalIgnoreCase)
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