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Recently, I was asked in a interview to implement a string reverse function using threads. I came up with most part of the solution below. Got selected or not is a different story :-). I tried to run the below solution on my home PC running Windows 8 consumer preview. The compiler is VC11 Beta.

The question is, the multi-threaded code is always either as fast or 1 millisecond slower than the sequential code. The input I gave is a text file of size 32.4 MB. Is there a way to make the multi-threaded code faster ? Or is it that the input given is too less to make any difference ?

EDIT

I only wrote void Reverse(char* str, int beg, int end, int rbegin, int rend); and
void CustomReverse(char* str); methods in the interview. All the other code is written at home.

 template<typename Function>
    void TimeIt(Function&& fun, const char* caption)
    {
        clock_t start = clock();     
        fun();     
        clock_t ticks = clock()-start;     
        std::cout << std::setw(30) << caption          << ": "          << (double)ticks/CLOCKS_PER_SEC << "\n"; 
    }

    void Reverse(char* str)
    {


        assert(str != NULL);
        for ( int i = 0, j = strlen(str) - 1; i < j; ++i, --j)
        {
            if ( str[i] != str[j])
            {
                std::swap(str[i], str[j]);
            }
        }

    }

     void Reverse(char* str, int beg, int end, int rbegin, int rend)
        {
            for ( ; beg <= end && rbegin >= rend; ++beg, --rbegin)
            {
                if ( str[beg] != str[rbegin])
                {
                    char temp = str[beg];
                    str[beg] = str[rbegin];
                    str[rbegin] = temp;
                }
            }
        }

        void CustomReverse(char* str)
        {
            int len = strlen(str);
            const int MAX_THREADS = std::thread::hardware_concurrency();
            std::vector<std::thread> threads;

            threads.reserve(MAX_THREADS);

            const int CHUNK = len / MAX_THREADS > (4096) ? (4096) : len / MAX_THREADS;

            /*std::cout << "len:" << len << "\n";
            std::cout << "MAX_THREADS:" << MAX_THREADS << "\n";
            std::cout << "CHUNK:" << CHUNK << "\n";*/

        for ( int i = 0, j = len - 1; i < j; )
                {
                    if (i + CHUNK < j && j - CHUNK > i )
                    {
                        for ( int k = 0; k < MAX_THREADS && (i + CHUNK < j && j - CHUNK > i ); ++k)
                        {                                                
                             threads.push_back( std::thread([=, &str]() { Reverse(str, i,    
                                                    i + CHUNK, j, j - CHUNK); }));
                            i += CHUNK + 1;
                            j -= CHUNK + 1;
                        }


                        for ( auto& th : threads)
                        {
                            th.join();
                        }

                        threads.clear();
                    }
                    else
                    {          
                                        char temp = str[i];
                                        str[i] = str[j];
                                        str[j] = str[i];
                        i++;
                        j--;
                    }
                }
            }


        void Write(std::ostream&& os, const std::string& str)
        {
           os << str << "\n";
        }

        void CustomReverseDemo(int argc, char** argv)
        {
            std::ifstream inpfile;
            for ( int i = 0; i < argc; ++i)
                std::cout << argv[i] << "\n";

            inpfile.open(argv[1], std::ios::in);

            std::ostringstream oss;
            std::string line;

            if (! inpfile.is_open())
            {
                return;
            }
            while (std::getline(inpfile, line))
            {
                oss << line;
            }

            std::string seq(oss.str());
            std::string par(oss.str());

            std::cout << "Reversing now\n";

            TimeIt( [&] { CustomReverse(&par[0]); }, "Using parallel code\n");  
            TimeIt( [&] { Reverse(&seq[0]) ;}, "Using Sequential Code\n");
            TimeIt( [&] { Reverse(&seq[0]) ;}, "Using Sequential Code\n");
            TimeIt( [&] { CustomReverse(&par[0]); }, "Using parallel code\n");      



            Write(std::ofstream("sequential.txt"), seq);
            Write(std::ofstream("Parallel.txt"), par);
        }

        int main(int argc, char* argv[])
        {
            CustomReverseDemo(argc, argv);
        }
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I tried compiling and running your code, but unfortunately it seems my system does not support std::thread (I got MAX_THREAD = 0 :-/) My only question is: what exactly TimeIt does? Is this your own time measurement function? Might be the problem is there? –  sergico May 13 '12 at 17:06
    
Also: Why do you trim the chunk size to 4096, to optimize for cache? –  sergico May 13 '12 at 17:13
    
Multi-threaded code is quite often slower than sequential code. The assumption that MT is faster is generally quite false. –  Crazy Eddie May 13 '12 at 17:20
    
@sergico Added TimeIt fn., replaced std::swap with swap code. As far as chunk size is concerned, what could be a better size ? –  Jagannath May 13 '12 at 23:42
1  
You might be suffering from premature optimization. Did the interviewer specify any performance constraints, because if they didn't, you can write MUCH simpler code. Also, if the problem was only to devise a string reversal function that utilizes threads, you went way overboard. –  Michael Price May 14 '12 at 4:16
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6 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

I tried to write the program with same functionality: My try of "Reversing a string using threads"

I have tested that with 2 core processor with VC11 Beta and mingw(gcc 4.8) on Windows 7

Testing results:

VC11 Beta:

7 Mb file:

Debug

Simple reverse: 0.468

Async reverse : 0.275

Release

Simple reverse: 0.006

Async reverse : 0.014

98 Mb file:

Debug

Simple reverse: 5.982

Async reverse : 3.091

Release

Simple reverse: 0.063

Async reverse : 0.079

782 Mb file

Release

Simple reverse: 0.567

Async reverse : 0.689

Mingw:

782 Mb file

Release

Simple reverse: 0.583

Async reverse : 0.566

As you can see multi-threaded code wins only in debug build. But in release compiler makes optimization and uses all cores even in case of single-threaded code.

So trust your compiler =)

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Well, I could have said that in the interview but just tried to answer the question without questioning the interviewer. –  Jagannath Apr 12 '13 at 8:02
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I found the code to be hard to comprehend but I have found the following problems:

  • Your block size of 4096 is far too small to be worth a thread. Starting a thread might be about as costly as the actual operation.
  • You are fork-joining a lot (for every CHUNK * MAX_THREADS chars). This is introducting a lot of unneeded join points (sequential parts) and overhead.

Partition the string statically into MAX_THREADS chunks and start MAX_THREADS threads. There are more efficient ways to do it but at least this will give you some speedup.

share|improve this answer
    
I could not arrive at proper block size. For the code to be not readable, is it void CustomReverse(char* str); fn. that was hard or the entire code is not written well ? –  Jagannath May 14 '12 at 0:13
    
I had problems with the loop logic. Also understanding what i and j represent. I guess that was just me. –  usr May 14 '12 at 9:20
add comment
  • Limiting the chunksize to 4096 does not make any sense.
  • Init once and then synchronize at the end should always be the pattern for parallel operations (think map/reduce)

Smaller things:

  • Checking if the chars are identical is every bad for any kind of pipeline optimization. Just do the swap().
  • In the parallel and sequential version you use different code for the swap. why?
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Sorry for the std::swap(). In the actual code did not have that. I was experimenting various cases and copy pasted that code here. –  Jagannath May 13 '12 at 23:35
    
For Parallel version, I thought Reverse(char* str, int beg, int end, int rbegin, int rend); is the way to do the reverse. –  Jagannath May 13 '12 at 23:45
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While you are using all the new threading features, you aren't using all the old good parts of the standard library, like std::string and iterators

You shouldn't write the threading stuff yourself but instead use a parallel algorithms library which offers something like a parallel_for construct.

Your task can be simplified to this:

  std::string str;

  // fill string

  auto worker = [&] (iter begin, iter end) {
      for(auto it = begin; it != end; ++it) {
        std::swap(*it, *(std::end(str) - std::distance(std::begin(str), it) - 1));
      }
  };

  parallel_for(std::begin(str), 
    std::begin(str) + std::distance(std::begin(str), std::end(str)) / 2, worker);

Note that you need quite a big text file to gain a speed up of this parallel approach. 34 MB might not be enough.

On small strings, effects like false sharing can have a negative impact on your performance.

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1  
Why the fast downvote? On couldn't even read that fast. –  bamboon May 13 '12 at 17:31
    
Yes. The file size was one of concerns. Since this was interview question and not for C++ on Windows, I could not give them the parallel_for solution. –  Jagannath May 13 '12 at 23:33
    
As far as parallel_for, it takes indexes and not iterators. parallel_for_each takes iterators but the lambda takes only 1 argument instead of 2 arguments in your worker. I take the suggestion of not creating threads explicitly. But the solution you gave does not work. –  Jagannath May 14 '12 at 0:11
    
@Jagannath I didn't target a specific parallel_for, you are probably refering to the PPL one. –  bamboon May 14 '12 at 17:04
    
This solution is incorrect it seems. parallel_for will chunk up the string and will reverse the chars within each chunk. The resulting string will not be a reversed version of the original one. –  Anton Pegushin May 15 '12 at 10:42
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Starting with 300 MB string size I'm seeing that multi-threaded version (TBB-based, see below) performs on average 3 times better than the serial version. Have to admit that for this 3x speedup it uses 12 real-hw cores :). I experimented a little with grain sizes (you can specify those in TBB for the blocked_range class object), but this did not make any significant impact, default auto_partitioner seems to be able to partition the data almost optimally. The code I used:

tbb::parallel_for(tbb::blocked_range<size_t>(0, (int)str.length()/2), [&] (const tbb::blocked_range<size_t>& r) {
    const size_t r_end = r.end();
    for(size_t i = r.begin(); i < r_end; ++i) {
        std::swap(*(std::begin(str) + i), *(std::end(str) - 1 - i));
    }
});
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Tested code

#include <iostream>
#include <mutex>
#include <thread>
#include <vector>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <memory.h>
#include <stdlib.h>

void strrev(char *p, char *q, int num)
{
    for(int i=0;i < num ; ++i,--q, ++p)
        *q = *p;
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    char *str;
    if(argc>1)
    {
        str = argv[1];
        printf("String to be reversed %s\n", str);
    }
    else
    {
        return 0;
    }

    int length = strlen(str);
    int N = 5;
    char *rev_str = (char *)malloc(length+1);
    rev_str[length] = '\0';

    if (N>length)
    {
        N = length;
    }

    std::vector<std::thread> threads;

    int begin=0, end=length-1, k = length/N;
    for(int i=1; i <= N; ++i)
    {
        threads.emplace_back(strrev, &str[begin], &rev_str[end], k);
        //strrev(&str[begin], &rev_str[end], k);
        begin += k;
        end -= k;
    }

    while (true)
    {
        if (end < 0 && begin > length-1)
        {
            break;
        }
        rev_str[end] = str[begin];
        --end; ++begin;
    }

    for (auto& i: threads)
    {
        i.join();
    }

    printf("String after reversal %s\n", rev_str);

    return 0;
}
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