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I remember having this problem once before but I dont know which project it was on or how I fixed it.

I have an ajax 'add to favorite' button, and I also have infinite scroll which ajax loads pages when you reach the bottom of the page. The problem is the ajax doesnt apply to the newly appended content

// Favorites
  $('.res-list .star').click(function(){
    var starLink = $(this);
    var listItem = $(this).parent().parent();

    if ($(starLink).hasClass('starred')) {
       $(starLink).removeClass('starred');
     } else {
       $(starLink).addClass('starred');
     }
     $.ajax({
       url: '/favorites/?id=' + $(starLink).attr('data-id'),
       type: 'PUT',
       success: function() {

         if ($(starLink).hasClass('starred')) {
           $(listItem).animate({
             backgroundColor: '#FFF8E4'
           }, 400);
         } else {
           $(listItem).animate({
             backgroundColor: '#ffffff'
           }, 400);
         }
       }
     });
     return false;
  });
share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need live event

$('.res-list').on('click', '.star', function() {

   // code here
});

or use delegate()

$('.res-list').delegate('.star', 'click', function() {

       // code here
    });

read about delegate()

read about on()

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a benefit to using one or the other? Thanks btw! – Tallboy May 13 '12 at 16:47
    
@Tallboy you can use anyone – The System Restart May 13 '12 at 16:48
    
Notice second one is similar to first one, except that it binds the handler to the specified element instead of the document root. – The System Restart May 13 '12 at 16:51

The .bind() method will attach the event handler to all of the anchors that are matched! That is not good. Not only is that expensive to implicitly iterate over all of those items to attach an event handler, but it is also wasteful since it is the same event handler over and over again.

The .delegate() method behaves in a similar fashion to the .live() method, but instead of attaching the selector/event information to the document, you can choose where it is anchored. Just like the .live() method, this technique uses event delegation to work correctly.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the clarification :) – Tallboy May 13 '12 at 16:58

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