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Database table:

id| p1 | p2 | notes
1 | 1  | a  | cat, mouse, dog
2 | 1  | a  | cat, horse, dog

I now need to run a query that selects the row where "notes" does not contain a string defined in the $exclusions array. I have tried the LIKE '%mouse%' operator, but that gave an error.

$exclusions = array ("mouse");
if($row['p1'] == 1 && $row['p2'] == "a" && $row['notes'] not like '%mouse%') {...}

Thank you.

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Are you using PHP? –  Thom Wiggers May 13 '12 at 17:10
    
Without a little more to refer to, it's hard to identify what the syntax problem might be...for example I don't see the WHERE...is there and AND missing, or an OR? "NOT LIKE '%mouse%' is correct syntax, so your usage of it within the rest of the SQL statement must be wrong. –  GDP May 13 '12 at 17:12
    
My guess is the OP wants the logic done in the PHP code. So the SQL statement is most likely a "select * from table"; it is unclear if they want the solution via the sql command or the php code. –  Gaʀʀʏ May 13 '12 at 17:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Looks like you are doing the logic in a mix of PHP code and sql. To do it in php, you can do

!strstr($row['notes'], 'mouse')

That says "If there is no occurrence of "mouse" in $row['notes']"

The ! will make it return true if there is no occurrence.

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thanks - this works! how do i modify this if there are more than one string to be excluded? –  user1291842 May 13 '12 at 17:23
    
thanks le_garry, much appreciated! –  user1291842 May 13 '12 at 17:38
    
Sorry, I needed to delete that last comment due to an error. It is best to write out the logic on paper for how you want the code to behave, so you don't get mixed up in NOTs, ANDs, and ORs. For example, you dont want any result that has "mouse" or "dog" would look like: !strstr($row['notes'], 'mouse') || !strstr($row['notes'], 'dog') Literally meaning: "No occurrence of mouse OR no occurrence of dog".... You can also write the code without the NOT operand-- "strstr($row['notes'], 'mouse')" - which means, "if(Notes contains mouse) ... " –  Gaʀʀʏ May 13 '12 at 17:39
    
ok - thx for the correction –  user1291842 May 13 '12 at 18:35
    
actually - the || operand appears not to be working, while stacking && one after the other does –  user1291842 May 13 '12 at 18:42
if($row['p1'] == 1 && $row['p2'] == "a" && $row['notes'] not like '%mouse%') {...}

This is not MySQL syntax. It looks like PHP, and in PHP you can not use LIKE. Try a string comparison operator like strstr. http://php.net/manual/en/function.strstr.php

Mysql Style

A query to get all rows without mouse could be this:

 SELECT * FROM `tablename` 
 WHERE `notes` NOT LIKE '%mouse%';

Or to get the exclusions from a php array:

 $condition = "WHERE ";
 $first = true;
 foreach($exclusions as $ex) {
      if(!$first) $condition .= " AND "; // or use OR
      $condition .= "`notes` NOT LIKE \"%$ex%\"";
      $first = false;
 }

 $complete_query = "SELECT * FROM `tablename` $condition;";
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