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I have encountered a list of errors when i was trying to execute this erase function to remove '2' from my vector. I am not sure where is the problem. Help will be greatly appreciated!

STRUCT MyInt

struct MyInt
{
friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &printout, const MyInt &Qn)
{
   printout<< Qn.value << endl;
   return printout;
}

  int value;
  MyInt (int value) : value (value) {}
};

STRUCT MyStuff

struct MyStuff
{
  std::vector<MyInt> values;

  MyStuff () : values ()
  { }
};

MAIN

int main()
{
MyStuff mystuff1,mystuff2;

for (int x = 0; x < 5; ++x)
    {
        mystuff2.values.push_back (MyInt (x));
    }

vector<MyInt>::iterator VITER;
mystuff2.values.push_back(10);
mystuff2.values.push_back(7);

    //error points to the line below
mystuff2.values.erase(std::remove(mystuff2.values.begin(), mystuff2.values.end(), 2), mystuff2.values.end());

    return 0;

}

Error Messages

stl_algo.h: In Function '_OutputIterator std::remove_copy(_InputInputIterator, _InputIterator, const_Tp&) [with_InputIterator = __gnu_cxx:__normal_iterator > >, OutputIterator = __ gnu_cxx::__normal iterator > >, Tp = int]'

No match for operator=='

Erorr messages showed the partciular line violated practically stl_algo.h's lines Line 1267, 1190, 327, 1263, 208, 212, 216, 220, 228, 232, 236

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1  
"No match for operator==" What's unclear about it? You need to define an operator== function so you can compare myInt with integers. –  jrok May 13 '12 at 18:03
    
@jrok, that should be an answer. It really is that simple. –  chris May 13 '12 at 18:04
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You need to overload the == operator for class MyInt.

For example:

struct MyInt
{

friend ostream &operator<<(ostream &printout, const MyInt &Qn)
{
   printout<< Qn.value << endl;
   return printout;
}

// Overload the operator 
bool operator==(const MyInt& rhs) const
{
  return this->value == rhs.value;
}

  int value;
  MyInt (int value) : value (value) {}
};
share|improve this answer
    
That operator should be const. –  Benjamin Lindley May 13 '12 at 18:07
    
@BenjaminLindley Fixed it. What's the purpose of making it const? –  Mike May 13 '12 at 18:08
1  
So you could could compare two const MyInts. –  Jason Malinowski May 13 '12 at 18:09
    
@Michael: The same reason you made the argument const. Do you know what const on the end of a member function signature means? –  Benjamin Lindley May 13 '12 at 18:10
    
As a matter of fact it would be better to declare/define the comparison operator as a free function with the two arguments passed by constant reference. As it is, the operator is not symmetric: MyInt(5) == 5 compiles, but 5 == MyInt(5) will fail. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 13 '12 at 19:02
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There are two problems. The error you're seeing is telling you that you haven't defined a equality comparison between int and your type. In your struct, you should define one equality operator

bool operator==(int other) const
{
    return value == other;
}

and of course define a global operator in the other direction:

bool operator==(int value1, const MyInt& value2)
{
    return value2 == value1;
}
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