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In my main class, I have an inner class called Shape which extends JButton. This inner class has a private char variable that goes by the name of CUBE.

I wrote getters and setters for it. I noticed that in the main method, instead of using:

(instance of Shape).getCUBE(); 

I can access it by using:

(instance of Shape).CUBE

Does this happen because CUBE is ultimately in the same class as main?

Is it necessary by java programming conventions that I write getters and setters for such an inner class?

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BTW, that shouldn't be all-caps. –  SLaks May 13 '12 at 18:07

3 Answers 3

Does this happen because CUBE is ultimately in the same class as main?

No, it works because the language specification says it does. It will end up as a separate class as far as the JVM is concerned, but extra package-level methods will be created to allow the outer class to appear to violate the normal rules.

The relevant section of the language specification is in 6.6.1:

Otherwise, if the member or constructor is declared private, then access is permitted if and only if it occurs within the body of the top level class (§7.6) that encloses the declaration of the member or constructor.

(Emphasis mine.)

So actually, even peer nested classes have access to private members. Sample code:

public class Test {

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        First first = new First(10);
        Second second = new Second(first);
        System.out.println(second.getValueFromFirst());
    }

    private static class First {        
        private final int value;

        private First(int value) {
            this.value = value;
        }
    }

    private static class Second {
        private final First first;

        private Second(First first) {
            this.first = first;
        }

        private int getValueFromFirst() {
            return first.value;
        }
    }
}

If you look at the generated classes (with javap -c Test$First and javap -c Test$Second you'll see the synthetic methods generated by the compiler.

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thank you so much! would it still be necessary by java convention to write the getters and setters? would it also be preferred to use them as opposed to "instance of object".variable? –  Zenos May 13 '12 at 18:21
    
I'm not sure, really. I've seen plenty of code both ways. I'd generally make the nested class private though (unless it's something like a builder) for clarity. –  Jon Skeet May 13 '12 at 18:28

This is a class to mimic your description:

import javax.swing.JButton;

class Main
{
   public class Shape extends JButton
   {
      private char CUBE = 'I';

      public char getCUBE()
      {
             return CUBE;
      }
      public void setCUBE(char CUBE){this.CUBE = CUBE;}
   }

   public static void main(String[] args) 
   {
      Shape sp = new Main().new Shape();
      System.out.println(sp.CUBE);
      System.out.println(sp.getCUBE());
   }
}

public class TestMain
{
    public static void main(String[] args) 
    {
     Main.Shape sp = new Main().new Shape();
     //System.out.println(sp.CUBE);
     System.out.println(sp.getCUBE());
    }
}

If you remove the comment, it won't compile. Therefore, if you want to access CUBE outside Main, you still need getter and setter.

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That works because you forgot to add the private keyword.

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No, it's accessible even if it's private. –  Jon Skeet May 13 '12 at 18:09

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