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I have two arrays. The first array contains the sort order. The second array contains an arbitrary number of elements.

I have the property that all elements (value-wise) from the second array are guaranteed to be in the first array, and I am only working with numbers.

A = [1,3,4,4,4,5,2,1,1,1,3,3]
Order = [3,1,2,4,5]

When I sort A, I would like the elements to appear in the order specified by Order:

[3, 3, 3, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 4, 4, 4, 5]

Note that duplicates are fair game. The elements in A should not be altered, only re-ordered. How can I do this?

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1  
You shouldn't start your variable names with capital letters, as then they become constants. Also, are there no values in A other than those in Order? –  Andrew Marshall May 13 '12 at 18:13
    
For this particular case, yes, there are no other values. If some array originally did have other values they would be filtered out before coming to this sort. –  MxyL May 13 '12 at 18:15

3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted
>> source = [1,3,4,4,4,5,2,1,1,1,3,3]
=> [1, 3, 4, 4, 4, 5, 2, 1, 1, 1, 3, 3]
>> target = [3,1,2,4,5]
=> [3, 1, 2, 4, 5]
>> source.sort_by { |i| target.index(i) }
=> [3, 3, 3, 1, 1, 1, 1, 2, 4, 4, 4, 5]
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+1. You beat me to it by 19 seconds, I deleted my answer :-) –  Michael Kohl May 13 '12 at 18:19
2  
@MichaelKohl you made a good point that if this array is likely to get big then the approach could probably be reconsidered, but this should be fast enough for most purposes –  Gareth May 13 '12 at 18:20

If (and only if!) @Gareth's answer turns out to be too slow, instead go with:

# Pre-create a hash mapping value to index once only…
index = Hash[ Order.map.with_index.to_a ] #=> {3=>0,1=>1,2=>2,4=>3,5=>4}

# …and then sort using this constant-lookup-time
sorted = A.sort_by{ |o| index[o] } 

Benchmarked:

require 'benchmark'

order = (1..50).to_a.shuffle
items = 1000.times.map{ order.sample }
index = Hash[ order.map.with_index.to_a ]

Benchmark.bmbm do |x|
  N = 10_000
  x.report("Array#index"){ N.times{
    items.sort_by{ |n| order.index(n) }
  }}
  x.report("Premade Hash"){ N.times{
    items.sort_by{ |n| index[n] }
  }}
  x.report("Hash on Demand"){ N.times{
    index = Hash[ order.map.with_index.to_a ]
    items.sort_by{ |n| index[n] }
  }}
end

#=>                      user     system      total        real
#=> Array#index     12.690000   0.010000  12.700000 ( 12.704664)
#=> Premade Hash     4.140000   0.000000   4.140000 (  4.141629)
#=> Hash on Demand   4.320000   0.000000   4.320000 (  4.323060)
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#sort_by already internally generates a temporary array of mapping values - is this Hash cache more efficient than the array of tuples referred to in the documentation? –  Gareth May 13 '12 at 19:06
1  
@Gareth Yes, because for n values in an array of size m using Array#index requires on average n*m/2 operations (worst case: n*m), while using the hash lookup always uses just m operations (or n+m for the case where you're including the hashing time in the calculation). Moreover, the n for index has to take place in slow Ruby land, while the n with the hash preparation takes place almost entirely in C. See my edit. –  Phrogz May 13 '12 at 20:40
    
@Gareth But, as you said in your comment, your answer will probably be "fast enough" most of the time. For example, sorting an array of 50 items with one of 10 values is about 30µs using your way and 15-20µs my way. :) –  Phrogz May 13 '12 at 21:00
    
Oh of course. I was only looking at the Hash you were building, and ignoring the way you weren't using Array#index –  Gareth May 13 '12 at 21:04

Another possible solution without explicit sorting:

source = [1,3,4,4,4,5,2,1,1,1,3,3]
target = [3,1,2,4,5]
source.group_by(&lambda{ |x| x }).values_at(*target).flatten(1)
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