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How can I wrap a recursive function, recursive calls included? For example, given foo and wrap:

def foo(x):
    return foo(x - 1) if x > 0 else 1

def wrap(f):
    def wrapped(*args, **kwargs):
        print "f was called"
        return f(*args, **kwargs)

    return wrapped

wrap(foo)(x) will only output "f was called" with the first call. Recursive calls still address foo().

I don't mind monkey patching, or poking around internals. I'm not planning to add this code to the next nuclear warhead handling program, so even if it's a bad idea, I'd like to achieve the effect.

Edit: for example, would patching foo.func_globals to override foo.__name__ work? If it always does, any side-effects I should be minding?

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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

It works if you use your wrapper function as a decorator.

def wrap(f):
    def wrapped(*args, **kwargs):
        print "f was called"
        return f(*args, **kwargs)

    return wrapped

@wrap
def foo(x):
    return foo(x - 1) if x > 0 else 1

Reason being that in your example, you're only calling the result of the wrap function once. If you use it as a decorator it actually replaces the definition of foo in the module namespace with the decorated function, so its internal call resolves to the wrapped version.

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Why didn't I think of that? Haha! Fantastic. Thanks. –  uʍop ǝpısdn May 13 '12 at 18:48
1  
actually in your original example if you used foo = wrap(foo) and then called foo(5), it would also do the equivalent thing :) But decorator syntax is the clearer way to do that. –  Kamil Kisiel May 13 '12 at 18:51
    
@uʍopǝpısdn do not forget to accept the answer :) –  brandizzi May 13 '12 at 19:00
    
This will work, but is there a way to do it without overwriting the original name in the namespace? @brandizzi didn't forget, there's a minimum time before accepting :) –  uʍop ǝpısdn May 13 '12 at 19:01
    
No, there's no way to do it without overwriting the original name in the namespace. You are calling the function by name; to call the wrap function rather than the original by that name, the wrap function must replace the original in the namespace. –  kindall May 13 '12 at 20:03
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Wrap the function with a class, rather than a function:

>>> def foo(x):
...     return foo(x-1) if x > 0 else 1
...
>>> class Wrap(object):
...     def __init__(self, f): self.f = f
...     def __call__(self, *args, **kwargs):
...         print "f called"
...         return self.f(*args, **kwargs)
...
>>> foo = Wrap(foo)
>>> foo(4)
f called
1
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That's exactly what I didn't want! xD –  uʍop ǝpısdn May 13 '12 at 18:49
    
It is not needed to wrap the function in a class - a function decorator would work as well. It did not work in the OP example because one should bind the wrapped function to the original name, as in @Kamil answer. –  brandizzi May 13 '12 at 18:51
    
Ohhhh haha I just reread the question. I thought you wanted the wrapper function to be executed ONLY once :P. Yeah, Kamil's answer works nicely for that. –  Joel Cornett May 13 '12 at 18:55
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