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I have two files:

  • file_1 has three columns (Marker(SNP), Chromosome, and position)
  • file_2 has three columns (Chromosome, peak_start, and peak_end).

All columns are numeric except for the SNP column.

The files are arranged as shown in the screenshots. file_1 has several hundred SNPs as rows while file_2 has 61 peaks. Each peak is marked by a peak_start and peak_end. There can be any of the 23 chromosomes in either file and file_2 has several peaks per chromosome.

I want to find if the position of the SNP in file_1 falls within the peak_start and peak_end in file_2 for each matching chromosome. If it does, I want to show which SNP falls in which peak (preferably write output to a tab-delimited file).

I would prefer to split the file, and use hashes where the chromosome is the key. I have found only a few questions remotely similar to this, but I could not understand well the suggested solutions.

Here is the example of my code. It is only meant to illustrate my question and so far doesn't do anything so think of it as "pseudocode".

#!usr/bin/perl

use strict;
use warnings;

my (%peaks, %X81_05);
my @array;

# Open file or die

unless (open (FIRST_SAMPLE, "X81_05.txt")) {
    die "Could not open X81_05.txt";
}

# Split the tab-delimited file into respective fields

while (<FIRST_SAMPLE>) {

    chomp $_;
    next if (m/Chromosome/); # Skip the header

    @array = split("\t", $_);
    ($chr1, $pos, $sample) = @array;

    $X81_05{'$array[0]'} = (
        'position' =>'$array[1]'
    )
}

close (FIRST_SAMPLE);

# Open file using file handle
unless (open (PEAKS, "peaks.txt")) {
    die "could not open peaks.txt";
}

my ($chr, $peak_start, $peak_end);

while (<PEAKS>) {
    chomp $_;

    next  if (m/Chromosome/); # Skip header
    ($chr, $peak_start, $peak_end) = split(/\t/);
    $peaks{$chr}{'peak_start'} = $peak_start;
    $peaks{$chr}{'peak_end'}  = $peak_end;
}

close (PEAKS);

for my $chr1 (keys %X81_05) {
    my $val = $X81_05{$chr1}{'position'};

    for my $chr (keys %peaks) {
        my $min = $peaks{$chr}{'peak_start'};

        my $max = $peaks{$chr}{'peak_end'};

        if (($val > $min) and ($val < $max)) {
            #print $val, " ", "lies between"," ", $min, " ", "and", " ", $max, "\n";
        }
        else {
                #print $val, " ", "does not lie between"," ", $min, " ", "and", " ", $max, "\n";
        }
    }
}

More awesome code:

  1. http://i.stack.imgur.com/fzwRQ.png
  2. http://i.stack.imgur.com/2ryyI.png
share|improve this question
3  
Sounds like a task for Text::CSV .. reinventing the wheel is not awesome ;) – matthias krull May 13 '12 at 23:24
    
How many rows (lines) in each file? Can a chromosome appear more than once in file 2, that is does each chromosome have its own peak range? If so, you can read in file 2 and run file 1 against it... – Bill Ruppert May 14 '12 at 2:11
    
Those are tab-separated, not tab-delimited, you know. – tchrist May 14 '12 at 2:51
    
need CPAN-man power! :) – gaussblurinc May 14 '12 at 7:55
    
@BillRuppert, file_1 has several hundred snps while file_2 has 61 peaks. There can be any of the 23 chromosomes in either file and file_2 has several peaks per chromosome. I want to find if the position of the snp in file_1 falls within the peak_start and peak_end in file_2 for each matching chromosome. – Tjb LaMac May 14 '12 at 9:15
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The points raised by @David are good; try to incorporate those in your programs. (I have borrowed most of the code from @David's post.)

One thing I didn't understand is that why load both peak values and position in hash, as loading one would suffice. As each chromosome has more than one record, use HoA. My solution is based on that. You might need to change the cols and their positions.

use strict;
use warnings;

our $Sep = "\t";
open (my $peak_fh, "<", "data/file2");
my %chromosome_hash;

while (my $line = <$peak_fh>) {
    chomp $line;
    next if $line =~ /Chromosome/; #Skip Header
    my ($chromosome) = (split($Sep, $line))[0];
    push @{$chromosome_hash{$chromosome}}, $line; # Store the line(s) indexed by chromo
}
close $peak_fh;

open (my $position_fh, "<", "data/file1");

while (my $line = <$position_fh>) {
    chomp $line;
    my ($chromosome, $snp, $position) = split ($Sep, $line);
    next unless exists $chromosome_hash{$chromosome};

    foreach my $peak_line (@{$chromosome_hash{$chromosome}}) {
        my ($start,$end) = (split($Sep, $line))[1,2];

        if ($position >= $start and $position <= $end) {
            print "MATCH REQUIRED-DETAILS...$line-$peak_line\n";
        }
        else {
            print "NO MATCH REQUIRED-DETAILS...$line-$peak_line\n";
        }
    }
}
close $position_fh;
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much! @David's code was not taking care of the fact that each chromosome has more than one peak and it was replacing the peak_start and peak_end every time through the while loop. Your code was doing exactly what i wanted and i used David's print to file code to come up with the code that did the job! – Tjb LaMac May 15 '12 at 16:26
    
I wonder why someone voted this down. Perhaps whoever did it, could leave a comment. – Hameed May 16 '12 at 0:51

A couple of program hints in Perl:

You can do this:

open (PEAKS, "peaks.txt") 
   or die "Couldn't open peaks.txt";

Instead of this:

unless (open (PEAKS, "peaks.txt")) {
    die "could not open peaks.txt";
}

It's more standard Perl, and it's a bit easier to read.

Talking about Standard Perl, you should use the 3 argument open form, and use scalars for file handles:

open (my $peaks_fh, "<", "peaks.txt") 
   or die "Couldn't open peaks.txt";

This way, if your file's name just happens to start with a | or >, it will still work. Using scalars variables (variables that start with a $) makes it easier to pass file handles between functions.

Anyway, just to make sure I understand you correctly: You said "I would prefer ... use hashes where the chromosome is the key."

Now, I have 23 pairs of chromosomes, but each of those chromosomes might have thousands of SNPs on it. If you key by chromosome this way, you can only store a single SNP per chromosome. Is this what you want? I notice your data is showing all the same chromosome. That means you can't key by chromosome. I'm ignoring that for now, and using my own data.

I've also noticed a difference in what you said the files contained, and how your program uses them:

You said: "file 1 has 3 columns (SNP, Chromosome, and position)" , yet your code is:

($chr1, $pos, $sample) = @array;

Which I assume is Chromosome, Position, and SNP. Which way is the file arranged?

You've got to clarify exactly what you're asking for.

Anyway, here's the tested version that prints out in tab delimited format. This is in a bit more modern Perl format. Notice that I only have a single hash by chromosome (as you specified). I read the peaks.txt in first. If I find in my position file a chromosome that doesn't exist in my peaks.txt file, I simply ignore it. Otherwise, I'll add in the additional hashes for POSITION and SNP:

I do a final loop that prints everything out (tab delimitated) as you specified, but you didn't specify a format. Change it if you have to.

#! /usr/bin/env perl

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);
use autodie;        #No need to check for file open failure
use constant {
    PEAKS_FILE        => "peak.txt",
    POSITION_FILE => "X81_05.txt",
};

open ( my $peak_fh, "<", PEAKS_FILE );
my %chromosome_hash;

while ( my $line = <$peak_fh> ) {
    chomp $line;
    next if $line =~ /Chromosome/;   #Skip Header
    my ( $chromosome, $peak_start, $peak_end ) = split ( "\t", $line );
    $chromosome_hash{$chromosome}->{PEAK_START} = $peak_start;
    $chromosome_hash{$chromosome}->{PEAK_END} = $peak_end;
}
close $peak_fh;

open ( my $position_fh, "<", POSITION_FILE );

while ( my $line = <$position_fh> ) {
    chomp $line;
    my ( $chromosome, $position, $snp ) = split ( "\t", $line );
    next unless exists $chromosome_hash{$chromosome};

    if ( $position >= $chromosome_hash{$chromosome}->{PEAK_START}
            and $position <= $chromosome_hash{$chromosome}->{PEAK_END} ) {
        $chromosome_hash{$chromosome}->{SNP} = $snp;
        $chromosome_hash{$chromosome}->{POSITION} = $position;
    }
}
close $position_fh;

#
# Now Print
#

say join ("\t", qw(Chromosome, SNP, POSITION, PEAK-START, PEAK-END) );
foreach my $chromosome ( sort keys %chromosome_hash ) {
    next unless exists $chromosome_hash{$chromosome}->{SNP};
    say join ("\t",
        $chromosome,
        $chromosome_hash{$chromosome}->{SNP},
        $chromosome_hash{$chromosome}->{POSITION},
        $chromosome_hash{$chromosome}->{PEAK_START},
        $chromosome_hash{$chromosome}->{PEAK_END},
    );
}

A few things:

  • Leave spaces around parentheses on both sides. It makes it easier to read.
  • I use parentheses when others don't. The current style is not to use them unless you have to. I tend to use them for all functions that take more than a single argument. For example, I could have said open my $peak_fh, "<", PEAKS_FILE;, but I think parameters start to get lost when you have three parameters on a function.
  • Notice I use use autodie;. This causes the program to quit if it can't open a file. That's why I don't even have to test whether or not the file opened.
  • I would have preferred to use object oriented Perl to hide the structure of the hash of hashes. This prevents errors such as thinking that the start peek is stored in START_PEEK rather than PEAK_START. Perl won't detect these type of miskeyed errors. Therefore, I prefer to use objects whenever I am doing arrays of arrays or hashes of hashes.
share|improve this answer
    
I like this answer. But, I think you fell in the same trap that I did in regards to the format of the file. The Chromosome fields as I thought initially is not unique (notice the links after his code). So, every time you loop through peaks file, it overwrite the start and end values, at least for the set in that image link. – Hameed May 14 '12 at 5:13
    
Thanks for this awesome attempt especially the final output! The files are arranged as shown in the screenshots. @Hameed is right, the chromosome in file_1 and file_2 can be any of the 23. In the peaks file (file_2), each chromosome has several peaks. So i would like to check if the chromosome in file_1 matches the chromosome in file_2, if yes, find if the position lies in any of the peaks on that chromosome. – Tjb LaMac May 14 '12 at 8:41
    
I really liked your approach. Will you please edit your code in relation to the two comments above and the post by @tuxuday below? Thanks! – Tjb LaMac May 14 '12 at 10:49
1  
@Hameed - I saw the same thing with the data, and I made a comment in it in my post about this particular issue. However, the OP said key by chromosome and I did. – David W. May 15 '12 at 16:44
1  
@TjbLaMac It appears that I can't just key by chromosome since multiple SNPs can occur on a single chromosome. Therefore, I have to store SNP data a bit differently. There's also a question about range. Let's say you have two ranges 3 to 7 and 4 to 9. I found my peek at 5. Which range is involved? Can these ranges overlap? For example, I have one from 4 to 7 and another from 5 to 10? All of this is important in understanding how the program should work. – David W. May 15 '12 at 16:50

You only need one for loop because you are expecting to find some of the SNPs in the second lot. Hence, loop through your %X81_05 hash and check if any matches one in %peak. Something like:

for my $chr1 (keys %X81_05)
{
    if (defined $peaks{$chr1})
    {
        if (    $X81_05{$chr1}{'position'} > $peaks{$chr1}{'peak_start'}
             && $X81_05{$chr1}{'position'} < $peaks{$chr1}{'peak_end'})
        {
            print YOUROUTPUTFILEHANDLE $chr1 . "\t"
              . $peaks{$chr1}{'peak_start'} . "\t"
              . $peaks{$chr1}{'peak_end'};
        }
        else
        {
            print YOUROUTPUTFILEHANDLE $chr1
              . "\tDoes not fall between "
              . $peaks{$chr1}{'peak_start'} . " and "
              . $peaks{$chr1}{'peak_end'};
        }
    }
}

Note: I Have not tested the code.

Looking at the screenshots that you have added, this is not going to work.

share|improve this answer

I used @tuxuday and @David's code to solve this problem. Here is the final code that did what I wanted. I have not only learned a lot, but I have been able to solve my problem successfully! Kudos guys!

use strict;
use warnings;
use feature qw(say);

# Read in peaks and sample files from command line
my $usage = "Usage: $0 <peaks_file> <sample_file>";
my $peaks = shift @ARGV or die "$usage \n";
my $sample = shift @ARGV or die "$usage \n";

our $Sep = "\t";
open (my $peak_fh, "<", "$peaks");
my %chromosome_hash;

while (my $line = <$peak_fh>) {
    chomp $line;
    next if $line =~ /Chromosome/; #Skip Header
    my ($chromosome) = (split($Sep, $line))[0];

    push @{$chromosome_hash{$chromosome}}, $line; # Store the line(s) indexed by chromosome
}
close $peak_fh;

open (my $position_fh, "<", "$sample");

while (my $line = <$position_fh>) {
    chomp $line;
    next if $line =~ /Marker/; #Skip Header
    my ($snp, $chromosome, $position) = split ($Sep, $line);

    # Check if chromosome in peaks_file matches chromosome in sample_file
    next unless exists $chromosome_hash{$chromosome};

    foreach my $peak_line (@{$chromosome_hash{$chromosome}}) {

        my ($start,$end,$peak_no) = (split( $Sep, $peak_line ))[1,2,3];

        if ( $position >= $start and $position <= $end) {

            # Print output
            say join ("\t",
                $snp,
                $chromosome,
                $position,
                $start,
                $end,
                $peak_no,
            );
        }
        else {
            next; # Go to next chromosome
        }
    }
}
close $position_fh;
share|improve this answer

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