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Why when i load page it runs function and alerts me "function run" i did not call it nowhere i need function to only trigger on element click.

<script type="text/javascript">

open_close = function() {
   alert("function run");
   //some code ...
}

window.onload = function() {
   //some code ...
   var myButton = document.getElementById('button');
   myButton.onclick = open_close();
   //some code ...
}

</script>

Here's jfiddle demo http://jsfiddle.net/ayeBP/

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up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ah, but you did run it:

myButton.onclick = open_close();

Parentheses invoke a function. Use this instead:

myButton.onclick = open_close;

Better still (click through for legacy IE support):

myButton.addEventListener('click', open_close);

Okay this was simplidied function i need to actually pass 2 variables to it e.g. myButton.onclick = open_close(var1,var2);

You still cannot use parentheses as you keep trying to do, because parentheses invoke the function. Use an anonymous function:

myButton.onclick = function () {
    open_close(var1, var2);
};

// or, even better,
myButton.addEventListener('click', function () {
    open_close(var1, var2);
});
share|improve this answer
1  
that's why jQuery is always a better way to this kind of stuff in IE~ $("myButton").on("click",open_close); – Derek 朕會功夫 May 13 '12 at 21:30
    
Yup, there are very good reasons for using jQuery. – Matt Ball May 13 '12 at 21:31
    
Okay this was simplidied function i need to actually pass 2 variables to it e.g. myButton.onclick = open_close(var1,var2); I know someone will mention jquerry i just knew it... – redacted May 13 '12 at 21:34
    
@redacted look, you used parentheses again. You can't do that, because it invokes the function. Editing... – Matt Ball May 13 '12 at 21:38
    
@redacted see my edit. But seriously, what's your reason for not using some sort of cross-browser library? If you loathe jQuery and the fanboys (myself included) there are plenty others to choose from. – Matt Ball May 13 '12 at 21:41

Replace open_close() with open_close

Using parentheses here will invoke the function immediately and assign the return value of it to myButton.onclick

share|improve this answer
    
Okay this was simplidied function i need to actually pass 2 variables to it e.g. myButton.onclick = open_close(var1,var2); – redacted May 13 '12 at 21:36

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