Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I did some searching and there where others asking this question and answers to it but none that seemed to fit what I was trying to do. Basically I'm working on a validation of the phone entry that accepts (123)4567890 as an entry. I've already implemented one that accepts a simple number string such as 1234567890 and one with dashes 123-456-7890. I know I'm making a simple mistake somewehre but I can't figure out what I'm doing wrong.

Here's the phone number with dashes form that is working:

//Validates phone number with dashes. 
function isTwelveAndDashes(phone) {

    if (phone.length != 12) return false;

    var pass = true;

    for (var i = 0; i < phone.length; i++) {
        var c = phone.charAt(i);

        if (i == 3 || i == 7) {
            if (c != '-') {
                pass = false;
            }
        }
        else {
            if (!isDigit(c)) {
                pass = false;
            }
        }
    }

    return pass;
}​

and this is the one I can't manage to work out.

function isTwelveAndPara(phone) {
    if (phone.length != 12) return false;

    var pass = true;

    for (var i = 0; i < phone.length; i++) {
        var c = phone.charAt(i);

        if (i == 0) {
            if (c != '(') {
                pass = false;
            }
        }

        if (i == 4) {
            if (c != ')') {
                pass = false;
            }
        }
        else {
            if (!isDigit(c)) {
                pass = false;
            }
        }
    }

    return pass;
}​
share|improve this question
2  
Here's how to validate phone numbers: Don't. What if your user is overseas? What if they have an extension? The benefit you get from validation is usually washed out by closing doors you didn't mean to close. (And no validation will ensure you get a valid phone number; any validation rule can be fooled with a real-looking, fake number.) –  T.J. Crowder May 13 '12 at 23:23
    
To clarify this isn't being used for a commercial website, but part of my education. I'm looking to see what I'm doing wrong. I know its with the if statements on for the ( and ) characters but I'm not sure the proper syntax to join both of them into an if ( && ) statement. –  Joshua Aslan Smith May 13 '12 at 23:27
    
@T.J.Crowder. You forgot to mention that string pattern checks should be done with regex... +1 –  gdoron May 13 '12 at 23:27
    
Ive seen this example in answer to similar questions. I don't doubt that it works (and is in fact better programming than what I'm showing) , but for the purpose of the exercise I need to stay within similar style of the isTwelveAndDashes(phone) function. –  Joshua Aslan Smith May 13 '12 at 23:36
    
Your last else part will evaluate all the i values except 4. You wanna use else ifs instead. Check my sugestion below for an example. –  inhan May 13 '12 at 23:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can do it very easily with regex:

return !!phone.match(/\(\d{3}\)\d{7}/g)

Live DEMO


Update:

The code you had didn't work because you forgot the else if:

    else if (i == 4) { // Added the "else" on the left.
share|improve this answer
    
What gdoron is referring to are called regular expressions. A supplement to his answer: look over Mozilla's RegExp docs or try it yourself. –  briangonzalez May 13 '12 at 23:26
    
Ive seen this example in answer to similar questions. I don't doubt that it works (and is in fact better programming than what I'm showing) , but for the purpose of the exercise I need to stay within similar style of the isTwelveAndDashes(phone) function. –  Joshua Aslan Smith May 13 '12 at 23:36
    
@JoshuaAslanSmith. O.k. See the update please. –  gdoron May 13 '12 at 23:39
    
Thank you. I knew it was something incredibly simple and dumb on my part. –  Joshua Aslan Smith May 13 '12 at 23:55
    
@JoshuaAslanSmith. glad to help. –  gdoron May 13 '12 at 23:57

Something like that (a RegExp rule) can make sure it matches either rule.

var numbers = ['(1234567890','(123)4567890','123-456-7890','1234567890','12345678901'];
var rule = /^(\(\d{3}\)\d{7}|\d{3}-\d{3}-\d{4}|\d{10})$/;
for (var i = 0; i < numbers.length; i++) {
    var passed = rule.test(numbers[i].replace(/\s/g,''));
    console.log(numbers[i] + '\t-->\t' + (passed ? 'passed' : 'failed'));
}

EDIT:

function isDigit(num) {
    return !isNaN(parseInt(num))
}
function isTwelveAndPara(phone) {
    if (phone.length != 12) return false;
    for (var i = 0; i < phone.length; i++) {
        var c = phone.charAt(i);
        if (i == 0) {
            if (c != '(') return false;
        } else if (i == 4) {
            if (c != ')') return false;
        } else if (!isDigit(c)) return false;
    }
    return true;
}

// or...

function isTwelveAndPara(phone) {
    if (phone.length != 12 || phone.charAt(0) != '(' || phone.charAt(4) != ')') return false;
    for (var i = 1; i < phone.length, i != 4; i++) {
        if (!isDigit(phone.charAt(i))) return false;
    }
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Ive seen this example in answer to similar questions. I don't doubt that it works (and is in fact better programming than what I'm showing) , but for the purpose of the exercise I need to stay within similar style of the isTwelveAndDashes(phone) function. –  Joshua Aslan Smith May 13 '12 at 23:36
    
Thank you. I knew it was something incredibly simple and dumb on my part. –  Joshua Aslan Smith May 13 '12 at 23:55
    
No problem. I wrote an alternative to your function, which is much shorter, just in case… –  inhan May 13 '12 at 23:57

Checking phone number with RegEx is certainly the way to go. Here is the validation function that ignores spaces, parentheses and dashes:

check_phone(num) {
   return num.replace(/[\s\-\(\)]/g,'').match(/^\+?\d{6,10}$/) != null}

You can vary the number of digits to accept with the range in the second regular expression {6,10}. Leading + is allowed.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.