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Let's say I have a server (DNS and other), myserver.com. Now I register a domain, mydomain.com, and set it's NS at the registrar to myserver.com - it is therefore the authoritative server, if there is any such thing.

In the authoritative records for mydomain.com, can I set the NS to ns.mydomain.com?

I have two domains set up like that, one works, the other one seems reluctant to propagate. So I'm wondering if there is something wrong with that - I mean how can you resolve the name of the NS when you need to resolve the name of the NS to resolve the name of the NS...

And, If yes, how come parallels plesk sets them automatically in this way?

Ps: there is an A record for ns.mydomain.com on that same server, pointing to the proper IP

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2 Answers 2

There's a solution for this problem - it's called "glue records", i.e. A records hosted in the parent zone that contain the IP addresses of the name servers.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Domain_Name_System#Circular_dependencies_and_glue_records

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Why would you want to set the NS record for the "mydomain.com":

  • to "myserver.com" in the delegation record that goes into the parent zone (com.), but
  • to "ns.mydomain.com" at the zone apex (inside the mydomain.com. zone)

? This creates an inconsistency (two different DNS servers answer the same question with two different answers) without any apparent benefit. You should try to help the DNS system as a whole issue consistent answers.

Unless you have a good reason to make the DNS inconsistent, you should decide what the correct, canonical name for your nameserver is, and publish that name in the NS record both in the delegation and at the zone apex for "mydomain.com".

That being said, it will still work:

  • If a recursive resolver which does not yet know anything about "mydomain.com" asks about it, it will be told by the gTLD servers to go look at "myserver.com". The gTLD will also issue A and AAAA glue records to help find "myserver.com", but even if they don't, you have A and AAAA records for "myserver.com" in the "myserver.com" zone file (right?).
  • If a recursive resolver which wants to refresh its cache for the "mydomain.com" NS record, it may query the authoritative server it already knows about. This server will answer that the nameserver is "ns.mydomain.com", with a glue record. This is different from what it had in its cache before, but ultimately it will map to a server with the same IP address.

As for "parallels plesk", I know nothing about that.

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