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I'm trying to add a very wide div to an existing, non-fixed-size div. Here's a minimal example (jsfiddle):

<html>
    <head/>
    <body>
        <div style="float: right; border: 1px solid green;">
            Some content
            <div id="problematic-div" style="border: 1px solid red; overflow: auto;">
                This_is_a_very_long_unbreakable_string_but_I_don't_want_it_to_have_the_ability_to_stretch_the_div<br/>
                It_should_have_a_horizontal_scrollbar_instead
            </div>
            Some content here too
        </div>
        Main content goes here
    </body>
</html>

What happens is that the large inner div makes the outer div stretch to fit. I'd like the outer div not to resize (instead, to keep the size that it would have if the inner div wasn't there), and instead have the inner div display a horizontal scrollbar.

This is very easy to do if it's possible to know how large the outer div should be, and limiting the inner div's width to that, but here I'd like to make the outer div's size criteria to be "use whatever width would fit all inner elements, except that wide inner div".

In order to do this, my guess is that the inner div needs to ignored from the outer one's size computations for width only, not for height, and that's what I'm not sure how to do. I've tried a few things:

  • Setting the outer div's position to relative and then setting the inner one's to absolute. This works to the extent that the outer div is no longer stretched by the inner one, but the horizontal scrollbar doesn't appear, its position is at 0,0 from the top-left corner of the outer div, and it overlaps some of the outer div's content
  • Making the inner div float, and wrapping it between two clear: both elements as follows, which still causes the outer element to stretch:

.

<div style="clear: both;"></div>
<div id="problematic-div" style="border: 1px solid red; float: left; overflow: auto;">
    This_is_a_very_long_unbreakable_string_but_I_don't_want_it_to_have_the_ability_to_stretch_the_div<br/>
    It_should_have_a_horizontal_scrollbar_instead
</div>
<div style="clear: both;"></div>
Some content here too
  • Some Mozilla vendor prefixes of width (min-content, fit-content, available), but none of them seemed to have the effect I want

In short, I'd like an effect much like the HTML code listing above on this very page, but this page achieves it by setting a fixed width on the question container. Is such a thing possible?

share|improve this question
    
You know of overflow:hidden and overflow-x:hidden I take it? If not, try that. –  D. Strout May 14 '12 at 1:42
    
@David overflow:hidden isn't applicable here as there is no specific width set on the container, and, as such, no overflow. –  chrisn May 14 '12 at 1:45
    
Ahh, of course. That makes sense. I understand now. Have to think about that one... –  D. Strout May 14 '12 at 1:47
1  
If I understand you correctly, what you are trying to do is logically incorrect. By not specifying a width for the outer div, you are effectively telling it to stretch to fit its contents. –  FluffyKitten May 14 '12 at 1:48
    
Is this something like you're looking for? jsfiddle.net/g9pQ6 You'll probably need to have your sidebar fixed width. –  xthexder May 14 '12 at 1:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

As I've said in my comments, its not possible to limit a width without actually specifying that limit. Do you have any guide for the sizing of the columns on your page, such as percentages or setting the main column width? Otherwise the page does not know how much space to allocate to each column and the appearance of your page will be unpredictable.

I gather the reason you don't want to set a width is so you can use the full available width of the screen. Therefore I suggest you use percentages e.g 30% of your side column on the right. This gives a predictable layout, and also allows you to achieve the scrollbar you require on the inner content because you have specified a limit on the outer div. e.g.

<div style="float: right; width:50%">
    Some content
    <div id="problematic-div" style="overflow-x: scroll; width: 100%;">
        This_is_a_very_long_unbreakable_string_but_I_don't_want_it_to_have_the_ability_to_stretch_the_div<br/>
        It_should_have_a_horizontal_scrollbar_instead
    </div>
    Some content here too
</div>

You will need to test that cross-browser but it should work in the majority of browsers)

share|improve this answer
1  
A word of advice - there is a vast difference in screen widths these days so it is very difficult to develop a page that fits to the width of the screen and still remains usable and readable - on small devices such as phones you will not have enough space in 2 columns for content to be readable; on large screens, the lines are too long which makes them difficult to read - the optimal width for reading is considered to be 60-75 chars. –  FluffyKitten May 14 '12 at 3:03

The only way I can think of doing this without setting a fixed width is to do this:

http://jsfiddle.net/pgRd5/

Set the inner div width to 0, and force overflow to be visible. Then on the outer div set overflow to auto, and the scroll bar will appear on the outer div. If you want the scroll bar on the inner div then you're out of luck.

This is not the best solution in the world, so I would suggest setting your sidebar to have a max-width property such as in this example.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not getting a scrollbar on anything with this code. But I agree with your suggestion of setting the width of the other column. It is impossible to set a limit on the width of an element without actually setting a limit, as the OP is trying to do! –  FluffyKitten May 14 '12 at 2:22
    
Using Firefox 12 I get a scroll bar. This code seems to have a different effect in Google Chrome. –  xthexder May 14 '12 at 2:24
    
Found a way to build on this so that the scrollbar shows up in the right place: jsfiddle.net/pgRd5/1 But indeed, it only seems to work in Firefox. +1 still for being really close –  Etienne Perot May 14 '12 at 2:29
    
@EtiennePerot, even if you wanted to limit your clients to Firefox this is a "hack" (no offence xthexder, but I think you know that already :) ) so you cannot depend on it working in future versions of Firefox. –  FluffyKitten May 14 '12 at 2:32

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