Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I'm a newbie in c# and visual studio, but not programming in general. I searched for answer to my question for 3 days and I found plenty of them, but for some weird reason (I'm sure I'm missing something very obvious) I cannot get it to work. I think it's the most basic question newbies like me ask. I have a form (Form3) with a text box and a button (I set it up is just for testing purposes). I want to populate and read this text box from another class. I understand the most proper way to do this is to create a property in Form3.cs with GET and SET accessors. I did that but I cannot get it to work. I'm not getting any error messages, but I'm not able to set the value of the text box either. It just remains blank. Here's my sample code:

namespace WindowsFormsApplication1
{
    public partial class Form3 : Form
    {
        public string setCodes
        {
            get { return test1.Text; }
            set { test1.Text = value; }
        }

        public Form3()
        {
            InitializeComponent();
        }

        private void Form3_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {   }

        private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
        {
            a.b();
        }
    }

    public class a
    {       
        public static void b()
        {
            Form3 v = new Form3();
            v.setCodes = "abc123";
        }
    }
}

Can someone lend me a hand solving this?

share|improve this question
1  
You might need to learn (or brush up on) the idea of the static keyword, and how instances of objects work. If you need help finding that, use Google, look for basic object-oriented programming intros, or ask here. –  Tim S. May 14 '12 at 2:26
    
Hello Tim, you're 100% correct. I need to hit help and learn how to use static keyword. I kind of felt this is where at least part of the problem was. -Tony. –  Tony May 14 '12 at 14:07

4 Answers 4

The problem is you are setting the value to a new instance of the form. Try something like this:

public partial class Form3 : Form {
    public string setCodes
    {
        get { return test1.Text; }
        set { test1.Text = value; }
    }

    private A a;

    public Form3()
    {
        InitializeComponent();
        a = new A(this);
    } 

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {            
        a.b();            
    }


    private void Form3_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {

    }
}

public class A
{       
    private Form3 v;

    public a(Form3 v)
    {
        this.v = v;
    }

    public void b()
    {
        v.setCodes = "abc123";
    }
}    
share|improve this answer
    
Hi ivowiblo,Like I said, I'm a newbie but the answer below by Enigmativity seems to be a little less complex to me and it actually works. He doesn't create new instance of class A in Form3 and there's only 1 method in Class A. Seems like there are as many unique answers as there are people answering. Beauty of internet. Thanks for your answer, I gained some unique perspective from it. –  Tony May 14 '12 at 14:03
    
Yep. What I would say is c# is an object oriented language and I'll suggest make use of object oriented designs instead of procedural designs. As you say, @Enigmativity's solution does the job and that's right. Maybe in your actual scenario you have a more complex situation and using an object will make it easier (suppose you need to pass more things, some that the Form doesn't know) –  ivowiblo May 14 '12 at 14:48

You're creating a brand new Form3() instance.
This does not affect the existing form.

You need to pass the form as a parameter to the method.

share|improve this answer

Try this:

public partial class Form3 : Form
{
    /* Code from question unchanged until `button1_Click` */

    private void button1_Click(object sender, EventArgs e)
    {
        a.b(this);
    }
}

public class a
{       
    public static void b(Form3 form3)
    {
        form3.setCodes = "abc123";
    }
}

This passes the current instance of the form to the other class so that it can update the setCodes property. Previously you were creating a new form instance rather than updating the current form.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi, this worked very well. I really appreciate your help. -Tony. –  Tony May 14 '12 at 14:05

Sending form instance to other other class

Form1 objForm1=new Form1();
obj.Validate(objForm1);

Easy way to access controls in another class by modifying Controls Private to Public in the Form(Designer.cs)

share|improve this answer
    
how did you able to get obj.Validate? –  Androidz Apr 17 at 2:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.