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I want to add a comma in the thousands place for a number. String.Format()?

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18  
Please consider changing the accepted answer, the most upvoted answer is a much better and concise answer to the question. –  George W Bush Jun 23 '13 at 19:57
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15 Answers

up vote 100 down vote accepted

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/fht0f5be.aspx

      ' Format a negative integer or floating-point number in various ways.
  Console.WriteLine("Standard Numeric Format Specifiers")
  s = String.Format("(C) Currency: . . . . . . . . {0:C}" & vbCrLf & _
                    "(D) Decimal:. . . . . . . . . {0:D}" & vbCrLf & _
                    "(E) Scientific: . . . . . . . {1:E}" & vbCrLf & _
                    "(F) Fixed point:. . . . . . . {1:F}" & vbCrLf & _
                    "(G) General:. . . . . . . . . {0:G}" & vbCrLf & _
                    "    (default):. . . . . . . . {0} (default = 'G')" & vbCrLf & _
                    "(N) Number: . . . . . . . . . {0:N}" & vbCrLf & _
                    "(P) Percent:. . . . . . . . . {1:P}" & vbCrLf & _
                    "(R) Round-trip: . . . . . . . {1:R}" & vbCrLf & _
                    "(X) Hexadecimal:. . . . . . . {0:X}" & vbCrLf, _
                    - 123, - 123.45F)
  Console.WriteLine(s)

Yields:

(C) Currency: . . . . . . . . ($123.00)
(D) Decimal:. . . . . . . . . -123
(E) Scientific: . . . . . . . -1.234500E+002
(F) Fixed point:. . . . . . . -123.45
(G) General:. . . . . . . . . -123
    (default):. . . . . . . . -123 (default = 'G')
(N) Number: . . . . . . . . . -123.00
(P) Percent:. . . . . . . . . -12,345.00 %
(R) Round-trip: . . . . . . . -123.45
(X) Hexadecimal:. . . . . . . FFFFFF85
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115  
The examples in this question use a number less than 1,000 (-123) which means the examples don't really address the actual question that was asked. –  Ted A. Jun 25 '13 at 21:49
7  
This answer is not informative at all –  sarsnake Feb 22 at 0:01
3  
just to add again - this answer is not even an answer. the page linked to does not contain the useful information for this either (although it takes you somewhere a few clicks away from it) –  jheriko Apr 11 at 12:55
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String.Format("{0:n}", 1234);

string.Format("{0:n0}", 9876); // no digits after the decimal point.
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6  
{0:n} is giving me unwanted decimal places –  Maslow Apr 16 '10 at 0:18
52  
{0:n0} will remove those –  Hafthor May 5 '10 at 17:47
14  
String.Format("{0:#,##0}", 1234); also works with no decimal places. –  Greg Bray Nov 5 '10 at 3:50
10  
@GregBray That solution is not good from an internationalisation point of view - other cultures use characters other than , as a thousands separator, for example a space or even .. –  Justin Jan 31 '12 at 17:02
14  
@Justin: According to msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0c899ak8.aspx, the ',' (and the '.') are replaced with the correct localized characters. –  Roger Lipscombe Mar 4 '13 at 9:29
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int number = 1000000000;
string whatYouWant = number.ToString("#,##0");
//You get: 1,000,000,000
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9  
This solution is not good from an internationalisation point of view - other cultures use characters other than , as a thousands separator, for example a space or even .. –  Justin Jan 31 '12 at 17:04
1  
Works thanks + 1. Have extended so shows up to 2 d.p. number.ToString("#,##0.##") –  Crab Bucket Mar 30 '12 at 10:38
    
@Justin This is true, but sometimes requirements are stupid, and requirements are requirements. :) Terrapin's method would be superior given enough flexibility, though, as you've pointed out. –  Mac Sigler Jun 6 '13 at 22:29
2  
@MacSigler That's the thing though, this code does not always print out a comma. Only when the culture is one that expects commas (e.g. en-US or invariant). If the culture is one that expects another separator (e.g. .), .NET will automatically replace the comma with that separator. Again, I urge you to read the link posted by Roger if you still do not understand why this is. –  Dan Oct 18 '13 at 18:33
2  
@MacSigler Justin's comment is still correct in that if you don't explicitly force the culture to en-US it will inherit culture settings from the local machine. My understanding is that compiling the code above, then running it on two machines with different cultures (with different number separators) would produce different results. If you want it to always produce a comma, you need to explicitly set a culture that uses the comma (e.g. invariant). –  Dan Oct 22 '13 at 14:12
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I found this to be the simplest way:

myString.ToString("N0")
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1  
You can also use it with string.Format, as in string.Format("Here is some number with commas, and no decimals, {0:N0}", 123456789(; –  Dan Morphis Oct 21 '11 at 2:52
    
This is actually the only one that works properly. –  IanC Feb 14 '13 at 14:15
    
This is the answer I also used. Works as desired and simple. –  JohnDubya Nov 19 '13 at 16:17
    
Same here, everything else on this page was useless. –  andrew.cuthbert Apr 27 at 6:16
1  
shouldn't it be myInteger.ToString("N0") ... string.tostring i don't think would work. –  taybriz May 14 at 22:05
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if u want culture specific, you might want to try this.

(19950000.0).ToString("N",new CultureInfo("en-US")) = 19,950,000.00

(19950000.0).ToString("N",new CultureInfo("is-IS")) = 19.950.000,00

note: some cultures use , to mean decimal rather than . so becareful.

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int num = 98765432;
Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0:#,#}", num));
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2  
Or Console.WriteLine("{0:#,#}",num); if you just want to print it. But string.Format(...) is more useful I guess. –  Kip9000 Aug 25 '11 at 14:42
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String.Format("{0:#,###,###.##}", MyNumber)

That will give you commas at the relevant points.

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2  
The ":n" method is better since it should respect the user's locale. –  Torlack Sep 19 '08 at 21:30
5  
This is true, but it's not guaranteed to give you commas at the thousand point because it respect the user's locale. –  Stephen Wrighton Sep 19 '08 at 21:35
    
right back at you: that is true, but it's not guaranteed to respect the user's locale because it uses commas as thousands separator. (As an example, in Portugal the comma is instead the decimal separator.) –  ANeves May 19 '10 at 17:46
    
If you want to enforce values after the . you need to replace the # with a 0. msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0c899ak8(v=vs.110).aspx: Zero replaces the zero with the corresponding digit if one is present; otherwise, zero appears in the result string whereas the "#" symbol is replaced with the corresponding digit if one is present; otherwise, no digit appears in the result string. –  kleinkie Feb 6 at 9:29
    
this method worked ok for my requirement, the msdn page about the Int32.ToString method that would be a primary place it would be used msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/8wch342y.aspx isn't very helpful for this particular application either –  stackuser83 Mar 25 at 0:24
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Note that the value that you're formatting should be numeric. It doesn't look like it will take a string representation of a number and format is with commas.

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For example String.Format("{0:0,0}", 1); returns 01, for me is not valid

This works for me

19950000.ToString("#,#", CultureInfo.InvariantCulture));

output 19,950,000

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If you wish to force a "," separator regardless of culture (for example in a trace or log message), the following code will work and has the added benefit of telling the next guy who stumbles across it exactly what you are doing.

int integerValue = 19400320; 
string formatted = string.Format(CultureInfo.InvariantCulture, "{0:N0}", integerValue);

sets formatted to "19,400,320"

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Below is a good solution in Java though!

NumberFormat fmt = NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance();
System.out.println(fmt.format(n));

or for a more robust way you may want to get the locale of a particular place, then use as below:

int n=9999999;
Locale locale = new Locale("en", "US");
NumberFormat fmt = NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance(locale);
System.out.println(fmt.format(n));

US Locale OUTPUT: $9,999,999.00

German Locale output

Locale locale = new Locale("de", "DE");

OUTPUT: 9.999.999,00 €

Indian Locale output

Locale locale = new Locale("de", "DE");

OUTPUT: Rs.9,999,999.00

Estonian Locale output

Locale locale = new Locale("et", "EE");

OUTPUT: 9 999 999 €

As you can see in different outputs you don't have to worry about the separator being a comma or dot or even space you can get the number formatted according to the i18n standards

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1  
where did you use the variable locale ?? –  Smith Dec 21 '13 at 20:29
    
well correctly spotted, is it infact to be used while getting the currency instance like: NumberFormat fmt = NumberFormat.getCurrencyInstance(locale); corrected the code, thanks! –  Anirudh Dec 22 '13 at 6:05
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C# version of accepted answer,

Console.WriteLine("Standard Numeric Format Specifiers");
String s = String.Format("(C) Currency: . . . . . . . . {0:C}\n" +
                    "(D) Decimal:. . . . . . . . . {0:D}\n" +
                    "(E) Scientific: . . . . . . . {1:E}\n" +
                    "(F) Fixed point:. . . . . . . {1:F}\n" +
                    "(G) General:. . . . . . . . . {0:G}\n" +
                    "    (default):. . . . . . . . {0} (default = 'G')\n" +
                    "(N) Number: . . . . . . . . . {0:N}\n" +
                    "(P) Percent:. . . . . . . . . {1:P}\n" +
                    "(R) Round-trip: . . . . . . . {1:R}\n" +
                    "(X) Hexadecimal:. . . . . . . {0:X}\n",
                    - 1234, -1234.565F);
Console.WriteLine(s);

Example output (en-us culture):

(C) Currency: . . . . . . . . ($1,234.00)
(D) Decimal:. . . . . . . . . -1234
(E) Scientific: . . . . . . . -1.234565E+003
(F) Fixed point:. . . . . . . -1234.57
(G) General:. . . . . . . . . -1234
    (default):. . . . . . . . -1234 (default = 'G')
(N) Number: . . . . . . . . . -1,234.00
(P) Percent:. . . . . . . . . -123,456.50 %
(R) Round-trip: . . . . . . . -1234.565
(X) Hexadecimal:. . . . . . . FFFFFB2E
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If you want to show it in DataGridview , you should change its type , because default is String and since you change it to decimal it considers as Number with floating point

Dim dt As DataTable = New DataTable
dt.Columns.Add("col1", GetType(Decimal))
dt.Rows.Add(1)
dt.Rows.Add(10)
dt.Rows.Add(2)

DataGridView1.DataSource = dt
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The method I used to not worry anymore about cultures and potential formatting issues is that I formatted it as currency and took out the currency symbol afterwards.

if (decimal.TryParse(tblCell, out result))

{
  formattedValue = result.ToString("C").Substring(1);
}
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4  
This code is not culture independent - it will use whatever default culture is set on the machine running the code. This could create undesired output where that culture places their currency symbols at the end of the number rather than the start (e.g. fr-FR), or uses more than one character to denote the currency (e.g. da-DK), or does not separate thousands using commas (e.g. most of mainland Europe). –  raveturned Jun 13 '12 at 21:08
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you can use this code in javascript

function GetNumberWithQ(Price) {

    var myNumber = Price.toString(); // Price Is Your Namber Your Number 
       var myResult = "";
        for (var i = myNumber.length - 1; i >= 0; i--)
        {
            myResult = myNumber[i] + myResult;
            if ((myNumber.length - i) % 3 == 0 & i > 0)
                myResult = "," + myResult;
        }

        return myResult;   
}
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19  
you can use .WithCommas in any imaginary language too, but this is about c#. -1 –  atamanroman Jul 23 '10 at 11:54
    
I particularly appreciate the good commentting //Price is Your Namber Your Number –  foson Mar 3 at 21:19
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protected by Travis J Jul 10 '13 at 21:34

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