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I am arguing a bit with my teacher about if this is a factory pattern or not. can i get some of your guys input?

public class UrlFactory {
    private static boolean testMode;
    private static long testDate;

    public static URLConnection fetchConnection(String url) 
                                              throws IOException
    {
        URL address = new URL(url);

        if(testMode)
            return new MockURLConnection(address, testDate);
        return address.openConnection();
    }

    public static void SetTestMode(long testDate)
    {
        UrlFactory.testMode = true;
        UrlFactory.testDate = testDate;
    }

    public static void UnSetTestMode()
    {
        UrlFactory.testMode = false;
    }
}
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Could it be that your teacher is complaining about calling this a URLFactory when it is actually generating URLConnection objects? –  Ted Hopp May 14 '12 at 2:52
2  
Why does your teacher say that it's not a factory? –  Brendan Long May 14 '12 at 2:53
3  
I guess this could be classified as an implementation of a factory pattern, albeit a very poor one. P.S. Don't argue with your teacher, even if you disagree: it is often a lot like peeing against the wind. –  dasblinkenlight May 14 '12 at 2:56
    
I got not explanation on why it is not a factory class, but this implemtation made me go from 100% = A to 74% = D, am i am pritty sure this is a factory implemtation. –  DoomStone May 14 '12 at 4:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 12 down vote accepted

It looks structurally similar to a factory, but I would say it misses the point of the factory pattern. Ideally, a factory is instantiable and overrideable (e.g. has a virtual method for creation). I would recommend a design where UrlFactory is a non-static class with a virtual fetchConnection method. You can then have a derived class MockUrlFactory which overrides fetchConnection to return a MockURLConnection.

Example:

public class UrlFactory {
    public URLConnection fetchConnection(String url)
        throws IOException {
        URL address = new URL(url);
        return address.openConnection();
    }
}

public class MockUrlFactory extends UrlFactory {
    private long testDate;

    public MockUrlFactory(long testDate) {
        this.testDate = testDate;
    }

    public URLConnection fetchConnection(String url)
        throws IOException {
        URL address = new URL(url);
        return new MockURLConnection(address, testDate);
    }
}
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Can you show me in code what you maea? i find it a bit hard to imagin what you mean. –  DoomStone May 14 '12 at 4:17
    
@DoomStone: see my update. –  bobbymcr May 14 '12 at 4:51
    
Isn't it actually ConnectionFactory? From UrlFactory i would expect to create url instead. –  Imre L Feb 12 '13 at 14:47

As bobbymcr points out, there are definitely better, more object-oriented ways of implementing the Factory Pattern.

However, that does not preclude your example from being an example of the Factory Pattern per se.

Remember, the term "Design Pattern" itself is a little difficult to define. That means that most "Design Patterns" are also many times difficult to define in concrete terms. They are usually stated in very general terms with implementation details left to the developer. In fact, this generality is built into the very definition of Design Pattern:

The elements of this language are entities called patterns. Each pattern describes a problem that occurs over and over again in our environment, and then describes the core of the solution to that problem, in such a way that you can use this solution a million times over, without ever doing it the same way twice.

The looseness in definition many times makes discussions over Design Patterns quasi-religious in nature, and, as with any religion, there are many zealots. However, most of the zealots I've met make solid points that are worth considering, even if you don't adhere completely to the faith.

All that being said, my religious position is the same as bobbymcr's. Factory methods are for sub-classes to override.

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