Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In Visual Studio, if you select "Start Debugging" or "Start Without Debugging" to run the currently selected startup project, Visual Studio always builds the entire solution. This seems unnecessary, as all it really needs to do is build the project you wish to start, and its dependents.

If you have some unit tests projects for example, you can't run the startup project until all of your unit test projects also compile. At the very least, it is a waste of time building all of these unit test projects as the project one wishes to run will not be dependent on them anyway.

Is it possible to change this behaviour?

share|improve this question
up vote 12 down vote accepted

Yes, you can change this behaviour (and I always do, for the exact reasons you describe).

Go to Tools > Options > Projects and Solutions > Build and Run. then check "Only build startup projects and dependencies on Run".

share|improve this answer
    
FYI In Visual Studio 2012 RTM this is now checked by default. – Daniel Nolan Aug 17 '12 at 4:51
    
Actually, I just found out me and some of my colleagues had this unchecked on VS 2012. Probably since VS installation, as none of us does remember doing anything with this setting. – famousgarkin Nov 30 '12 at 8:22

In my case this was already checked but was still not building. VS 2012 was only building the main (start up) project but none of its dependencies. It found that it was because of the Active configuration in the ConfigurationManager was set to build only the Main (start up) project.

Go to Build > ConfigurationManager

Ensure that all the projects you want to build are checked as in the screenshot below

enter image description here

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.