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I've got a C++/CLI project that wraps a large number of classes - and the classes have their own meta-data system. So I'd like to return a dynamic object to make some use cases easy in C#. But I don't see how to do this in C++.

In C# I can write the following:

dynamic TestThisOut()
{
    return null;
}

void mork()
{
    var d = TestThisOut();
    d.Fork();
}

I would like to write TestThisOut() in C++/CLI, so that I can use it exactly the same way as I do in the "mork" function above (i.e. not having to type the dynamic keyword). Is this possible?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can create a dynamic object in c++/cli, you just can't consume it there as you would in C# project. However you can consume it from C#. Here is how you do it:

In C++/CLI create a property or a method that returns Object^. Mark this property or method with System::Runtime::CompilerServices::DynamicAttribute. You are good to go.

Here is a quick sample I created:

namespace ClassLibrary1 
{
    using namespace System;
    using namespace System::Dynamic;

    public ref class Class1 : public DynamicObject
    {
    public:
        [System::Runtime::CompilerServices::Dynamic]
        static property Object^ Global
        {
        public:
            Object^ get()
            {
                return gcnew Class1();
            }
        }

    public:
        String^ Test()
        {
            return "Test";
        }
    };
}

And my C# consumer:

Console.WriteLine( ClassLibrary1.Class1.Global.Test() );
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That attribute was exactly what I was searching for. Many thanks! –  Gordon Mar 30 '13 at 10:06

dyanmic is C# 4.0 keyword. It is not supported in C++ CLI (and also in VB.NET).

If you want to consume dynamic object in C++ CLI, then you can use impromptu-interface library. List of supported options. Information is from this question

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Thanks! I saw that question when I was researching this question. Unfortunately, it isn't what I want - I don't want to consume a dynamic object in C++/CLI - I want to create one. I was hoping that the C# "dynamic" keyword would actually be an attribute in the code, which I could apply in C++/CLI so I wouldn't have to type the dynamic keyword again in C#. –  Gordon May 15 '12 at 15:06
    
The dynamic keyword is C# sugar. The mechanics behind it are fully supported from any CLR language. The convenient way of accessing the members without static typing is also C# compiler sugar, the actual code generated is more complicated and can be seen with any .NET Decompiler. –  Ivan Zlatanov Mar 28 '13 at 15:14

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