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I have the following in a subclass of UIViewController;

- (id) initWithFullScreen
{
    self = [super initWithNibName:nil bundle:nil];

    if (self) 
    {
        _fullScreen = YES;
    }

    return self;     
}
- (id) init
{
    self = [super initWithNibName:nil bundle:nil];

    if (self) 
    {
        _fullScreen = NO;
    }

    return self; 
}

- (id) initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil 
{
    return [self init];
}

As you can see they aren't all chained together like recommended as there are two initializers that call the super classes designated initializer. Is this OK to do?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Yes, it's OK.

A designated initializer isn't part of the Objective-C language, it's just a convention. In general, if you route everything through one init method, your don't have to worry about duplicating code across all the other convenience init methods that you might want to offer.

It also lets you know which init method you should call on the superclass when you want to create a subclass. (Your third init method, initWithNibName... violates this rule, actually. Instead of calling the superclass's designated initializer, you're just calling init.)

In your case, declaring an initializer with the method signature initWithFullScreen:(BOOL)fullScreen and designating it the designated initializer is probably the way to go. And within that you make sure you call the superclass's designated initializer, which you are.

You could then create convenience initializers: initWithFullScreen and initWithoutFullScreen if you wanted to; they would both just call your designated initializer. For example:

- (id)initWithoutFullScreen
{
    return [self initWithFullScreen:NO];
}

So, it's OK to break the convention. You may have your reasons. But it's generally easier to keep your code organized if you stick to it.

Amendment

For extra credit, consider the NSCoding protocol, which requires classes to have an initWithCoder: method. One might say it violates the rule, since classes which adopt NSCoding and whose superclasses also adopt NSCoding must be prepared to have two paths to initialization: an initWithCoder: method which calls [super initWithCoder:coder] and the regular designated initializer.

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Why not do it this way instead:

- (id)initWithFullScreen:(BOOL)useFullScreen
{
  self = [super initWithNibName:nil bundle:nil];
  if(self) {
    _fullScreen = useFullScreen;
  }
  return self;
}

- (id)init
{
  return [self initWithFullScreen:NO];
}

- (id)initWithNibNameBlahBlahBlah...
{
  return [self init];
}
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Yeah I thought about doing this but just wondering if the way I currently have it is bad? –  CoDEFRo May 14 '12 at 5:33
1  
Practically speaking, you probably won't have any problems with your code as is. Not having one true designated initializer would complicate things if you started subclassing this class, because you'd have to be sure to override both of your quasi-designated initializers. –  UIAdam May 14 '12 at 5:35

Think of them as methods rather than initializers. So yes you can have as many methods as you want.
Also try to utilize nibNameOrNil and nibBundleOrNil in initWithFullScreen and init unless you really don't need them.
Also for simplicity you can have a method like this

- (id) initWithNibName:(NSString *)nibNameOrNil bundle:(NSBundle *)nibBundleOrNil fullScreen:(BOOL)useFullScreen
{
    if (self = [super initWithNibName:nibNameOrNil bundle:nibBundleOrNil])
      {
         _fullScreen = useFullScreen;
      }
    return self;
}
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This is a good answer, because having this as the designated initializer would still allow you to implement the other, shorter initializers for convenience, but also allow for maximum flexibility should you ever want to initialize the object with a different nibName or bundle. –  UIAdam May 14 '12 at 5:38
    
Yes, while developing a universal app in that case usually we create two xib, one for iphone/ipod and the other one for ipad and for that nib name are different from your class name. –  Inder Kumar Rathore May 14 '12 at 5:41

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