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NOTE: I added a similar but greatly simplified version of the problem at Ambiguous overload of functions like `msg(long)` with candidates `msg(int32_t)` and `msg(int64_t)`. That version has the advantage of a complete compilable example in a single file.

Problem

I have a C library with functions like

obj_from_int32(int32_t& i);
obj_from_int64(int64_t& i);
obj_from_uint32(uint32_t& i);
obj_from_uint64(uint64_t& i);

In this case the types int32_t etc are not the std ones - they are implementation defined, in this case an array of chars (in the following example I've omitted the conversion - it doesn't change the question which is about mapping intergral types to a particular function based on the number of bits in the integral type).

I have a second C++ interface class, that has constructors like

MyClass(int z);
MyClass(long z);
MyClass(long long z);
MyClass(unsigned int z);
MyClass(unsigned long z);
MyClass(unsigned long long z);

Note, I can't replace this interface with std::int32_t style types - if I could I wouldn't need to ask this question ;)

The problem is how to call the correct obj_from_ function based on the number of bits in the integral type.

Proposed Solutions

I'm putting two proposed solutions, since no killer solution has floated to the top of the list, and there are a few that are broken.

Solution 1

Provided by Cheers and hth. - Alf. Comments from this point on are my own - feel free to comment and/or edit.

Advantages - Fairly simple (at least compared to boost::enable_if) - Doesn't rely on 3rd party library (as long as compiler supports tr1)

Disadvantages* - If more functions (like anotherObj_from_int32 etc) are needed, a lot more code is required

This solution can be found below - take a look, it's nifty!

Solution 2

Advantages

  • Once the ConvertFromIntegral functions are done, adding new functions that need the conversion is trivial - simply write a set overloaded on int32_t, int64_t and unsigned equivalents.

  • Keeps use of templates to one place only, they don't spread as the technique is reused.

Disadvantages

  • Might be overly complicated, using boost::enable_if. Somewhat mitigated by the fact this appears in once place only.

Since this is my own I can't accept it, but you can upvote it if you think it's neat (and clearly some folks do not think it is neat at all, that's what downvote it for, I think!) Thanks to everyone who contributed ideas!

The solution involves a conversion function from int, long and long long to int32_t and int64_t (and similar for the unsigned versions). This is combined with another set of functions overloaded on int32_t, int64_t and unsigned equivalents. The two functions could be combined, but the first conversion functions make a handy utility set that can be reused, and then the second set of functions is trivially simple.

// Utility conversion functions (reuse wherever needed)
template <class InputT>
typename boost::enable_if_c<sizeof(InputT)==sizeof(int32_t) && boost::is_signed<InputT>::value,
 int32_t>::type ConvertFromIntegral(InputT z) { return static_cast<int32_t>(z); }

template <class InputT>
typename boost::enable_if_c<sizeof(InputT)==sizeof(int64_t) && boost::is_signed<InputT>::value, 
int64_t>::type ConvertFromIntegral(InputT z) { return static_cast<int64_t>(z); }

template <class InputT>
typename boost::enable_if_c<sizeof(InputT)==sizeof(uint32_t) && boost::is_unsigned<InputT>::value, 
uint32_t>::type ConvertFromIntegral(InputT z) { return static_cast<uint32_t>(z); }

template <class InputT>
typename boost::enable_if_c<sizeof(InputT)==sizeof(uint64_t) && boost::is_unsigned<InputT>::value, 
uint64_t>::type ConvertFromIntegral(InputT z) { return static_cast<uint64_t>(z); }

// Overload set (mock implementation, depends on required return type etc)
void* objFromInt32 (int32_t i)   { obj_from_int32(i); }
void* objFromInt64 (int64_t& i)  { obj_from_int64(i); }
void* objFromUInt32(uint32_t& i) { obj_from_uint32(i); }
void* objFromUInt64(uint64_t& i) { obj_from_uint64(i); }

// Interface Implementation
MyClass(int z) : _val(objFromInt(ConvertFromIntegral(z))) {}
MyClass(long z): _val(objFromInt(ConvertFromIntegral(z))) {}
MyClass(long long z): _val(objFromInt(ConvertFromIntegral(z))) {}
MyClass(unsigned int z): _val(objFromInt(ConvertFromIntegral(z))) {}
MyClass(unsigned long z): _val(objFromInt(ConvertFromIntegral(z))) {}
MyClass(unsigned long long z): _val(objFromInt(ConvertFromIntegral(z))) {}

A simplified (single compilable .cpp!) version of the solution is given at Ambiguous overload of functions like `msg(long)` with candidates `msg(int32_t)` and `msg(int64_t)`

share|improve this question
2  
You could write an overload set that takes int32_t, int64_t and so on that forwards to the appropriate obj_from_* and call that from the constructors. However that doesn't guarantee that you call an exact match, only that you get the best match (according to overload resolution rules), so I have no idea if that's worth an answer. –  Luc Danton May 14 '12 at 6:33
    
Is that different from the example I provided? I used boost types for portability, but I've tried the std ones too, same result. (To clarify: sounds like a good answer to me if I could get it to work!) –  Zero May 14 '12 at 6:35
    
The difference being that you map directly to the types the API uses. Your current solution doesn't necessarily (nor would it when using the Standard integer types). –  Luc Danton May 14 '12 at 6:37
    
Now I understand: that won't work because the C library uses an array of char as it's underlying type. I didn't put that in, because it obfuscates the question, but there is a cast in there to convert between the types. I've confirmed that part works by hard-wiring the functions (ie assume int is 32 bits and just wire it up). –  Zero May 14 '12 at 6:40
    
Probably worth an edit, there may be another way than solving your current attempt. Oh and it just hit me, try to avoid overloading on both signed and unsigned types in the same overload set. –  Luc Danton May 14 '12 at 6:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Instead of overloading, what about pattern matching? Use boost::enable_if and a helper template to select the type of operation you're looking for?

Something like this:

#include <boost/utility/enable_if.hpp>
#include <boost/type_traits/is_integral.hpp>
#include <iostream>

template <typename T, typename Dummy=void> struct helper;

// Handle signed integers of size 1 (8 bits)
template <typename T> struct helper<T, 
    typename boost::enable_if_c<
        boost::is_integral<T>::value && 
        (sizeof(T)==1) &&
        (static_cast<T>(-1) < static_cast<T>(0)) >::type>
{
    static void do_stuff(T const& ) {std::cout<<"signed, size 1"<<std::endl;}
};

// Handle unsigned integers of size 1 (8 bits)
template <typename T> struct helper<T, 
    typename boost::enable_if_c<
        boost::is_integral<T>::value &&
        (sizeof(T)==1) &&
        (static_cast<T>(-1) > static_cast<T>(0)) >::type>
{
    static void do_stuff(T const& ) {std::cout<<"unsigned, size 1"<<std::endl;}
};

// Handle signed integers of size 2 (16 bits)
template <typename T> struct helper<T, 
    typename boost::enable_if_c<
        boost::is_integral<T>::value && 
        (sizeof(T)==2) &&
        (static_cast<T>(-1) < static_cast<T>(0)) >::type>
{
    static void do_stuff(T const& ) {std::cout<<"signed, size 2"<<std::endl;}
};

// And so on and so forth....

// Use a function for type erasure:
template <typename T> void do_stuff(T const& value)
{
    helper<T>::do_stuff(value);
}

int main()
{
    do_stuff(static_cast<unsigned char>(0)); // "unsigned, size 1"
    do_stuff(static_cast<signed short>(0));  // "signed, size 2"
}

More complete listing (and proof it works with GCC at least) at http://ideone.com/pIhdq.

Edit: Or more simply, but with perhaps less coverage: (using the standard integral types)

template <typename T> struct helper2;
template <> struct helper2<uint8_t> {static void do_stuff2(uint8_t ) {...}};
template <> struct helper2<int8_t> {static void do_stuff2(int8_t ) {...}};
template <> struct helper2<uint16_t> {static void do_stuff2(uint16_t ) {...}};
template <> struct helper2<int16_t> {static void do_stuff2(int16_t ) {...}};
// etc.
template <typename T> void do_stuff2(T value) {helper2<T>::do_stuff2(value);}
share|improve this answer
    
If you don't care about signedness, you can of course drop the static_cast<T>(-1) < static_cast<T>(0) clauses, and only have to deal with half as many specializations of struct helper. –  Managu May 15 '12 at 0:53
    
I say 'with perhaps less coverage' because, for instance, on my platform, char is neither uint8_t==unsigned char nor int8_t==signed char. Moreover, pattern matching on type will give you the discriminatory power you want here, unlike overloading. But you need to ensure that you list all the types you care about. Or cover them implicitly as I did in the first example with the enable_if magic. –  Managu May 15 '12 at 1:05
    
Accepting because this is best answer, and thanks for prompting me to think about the signed/unsigned issue - I think it can be simplified (see edit in question) but welcome any feedback! –  Zero May 15 '12 at 1:24

Given 3rd party functions …

void obj_from_int32( int32_bytes_t& i );
void obj_from_int64( int64_bytes_t& i );
void obj_from_uint32( uint32_bytes_t& i );
void obj_from_uint64( uint64_bytes_t& i );

you can call the "correct" such function for a built-in type as follows:

template< int nBytes, bool isSigned >
struct ThirdParty;

template<>
struct ThirdParty< 4, true >
{
    template< class IntegralT >
    static void func( IntegralT& v )
    { obj_from_int32( v ) }    // Add whatever conversion is required.
};

// Etc., specializations of ThirdParty for unsigned and for 8 bytes.

template< class IntegralT >
void myFunc( IntegralT& v )
{ ThirdParty< sizeof( v ), std::is_signed< IntegralT >::value >::func( v ); }
share|improve this answer
    
That's neat! One drawback is each new function (say anotherObj_from_*) requires quite a bit more code as all the ThirdParty specializations need to be duplicated. Is it possible to adapt this technique to get a result similar to the ConvertIntegral of the proposed solution in the question? Anything I can think of seems at least as complicated as the boost::enable_if, although without the drawback fo requiring a third party library. –  Zero May 15 '12 at 3:28
    
@Zero: i don't quite understand what you mean -- "duplicated"? –  Cheers and hth. - Alf May 15 '12 at 4:24
    
@cheers-and-hth-alf To clarify, it's about the amount of code needed as the number of functions requiring this technique grows. In this question there is one function, in my prod code I have 15. The template specializations are more complicated than a one-liner like void* makeObjectA(int32_t z) { return make_objectA_int32(z); } in the overload set. Plus you avoid needing a functions like your myFunc each time, since you can reuse the same ConvertIntegral at the call site of any function. –  Zero May 15 '12 at 4:46
    
@Zero: "would require" is certainly wrong. however, i do not understand the situation you're referring to and so cannot yet advice you on some more reasonable way to deal with whatever it is. can you give more information about the 15 functions, what they do, and what their actual argument types are? note: i'm a bit frustrated by chasing a moving target here. so please, if possible, update your question with full details, in a new section. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf May 15 '12 at 4:48
    
For example three classes decimal32, decimal64, decimal128 all have a ctor that takes a single, integral type argument. eg decimal32(int z): I can implement this as decimal32(int z) : _val(decimal32fromIntegral(ConvertIntegral(z))) and four one-line helpers that look like DEC32T decimal32fromIntegral(int32_t z) { return dec32_from_int32(z); }. DEC32T is opaque library type. All up we have mapped 4*3=12 functions from the C API - although there's really only one 'semantic' function: construction of a DecmialT from an IntT. More classes or more semantic functions means more code. –  Zero May 15 '12 at 5:12

As we discovered in linked problem, the long is cause of ambiguity here. The line

MyClass(long z): _val(objFromInt(z)) {}

should be changed to something like:

MyClass(long z): _val(sizeof(long) == 4 ? static_cast<int32_t>(z) : static_cast<int64_t>(z)))) {}

Please note, that you will probably face similar problem with long long on 64-bit gcc.

share|improve this answer
    
This of course will work - but I'll hold out a little longer for a compile time solution. The information is all there at compile time... –  Zero May 14 '12 at 22:09
1  
sizeof is compile-time, so the expression reduces to constant-expression ? something : something-else, and the compiler's dead code eliminator will optimize that away. –  moshbear May 14 '12 at 23:43
    
@moshbear Interesting point... I definitely agree that relying on simple compiler optimizations like this is always a good idea in practice. However, can it be turned into a helper function (since you don't know the return type?) If not, I think this is a significant draw back because it makes it very hard to scale the solution to many functions. –  Zero May 15 '12 at 1:51
    
@Zero The only thing that comes to mind is constexpr and templates; the ?: solution is more elegant. –  moshbear May 15 '12 at 3:32
    
@moshbear My only concern is the amount of code duplication required as more classes would be added (currently I have 16 functions that would require this technique...). It's for this reason I'm still leaning toward the boost::enable_if solution, the complicated bit need only be done once. For example, if ConvertIntegral were provided as a boost library function I would certainly think that the most elegant solution. –  Zero May 15 '12 at 3:37

As pointed out in other answers, this can be trivially solved at runtime using if(sizeof(int)==sizeof(int32_t)) style branches. To do this at compile-time, boost::enable_if can be used.

template <class InputT>
typename boost::enable_if_c<sizeof(InputT)==sizeof(int32_t) && boost::is_signed<InputT>::value,
 int32_t>::type ConvertIntegral(InputT z) { return static_cast<int32_t>(z); }

template <class InputT>
typename boost::enable_if_c<sizeof(InputT)==sizeof(int64_t) && boost::is_signed<InputT>::value, 
int64_t>::type ConvertIntegral(InputT z) { return static_cast<int64_t>(z); }

template <class InputT>
typename boost::enable_if_c<sizeof(InputT)==sizeof(uint32_t) && boost::is_unsigned<InputT>::value, 
uint32_t>::type ConvertIntegral(InputT z) { return static_cast<uint32_t>(z); }

template <class InputT>
typename boost::enable_if_c<sizeof(InputT)==sizeof(uint64_t) && boost::is_unsigned<InputT>::value, 
uint64_t>::type ConvertIntegral(InputT z) { return static_cast<uint64_t>(z); }

Anywhere you need to convert an integral type to an int32_t, int64_t, uint32_t or uint64_t simply call like:

ConvertIntegral(long(5));  // Will return a type compatible with int32_t or int64_t

The ConvertIntegral function can be combined with the int32_t and int64_t overload set for a complete solution. Alternatively, the technique illustrated could be built-in to the overload set.

Also, the above could be further enhanced by disabling for non-integral types. For a complete example of using the functions, see Ambiguous overload of functions like `msg(long)` with candidates `msg(int32_t)` and `msg(int64_t)`

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks to @Managu who prompted me to think about the signed problem –  Zero May 15 '12 at 1:05
    
"To do this at compile time, boost::enable_if..." –  Managu May 15 '12 at 1:19
    
@Managu Of course (again)!! Thanks ;) –  Zero May 15 '12 at 1:48

An ambiguity can easily stem from overloading on both signed and unsigned types. For instance, given

void foo(unsigned int);
void foo(long);

then foo(0) is ambiguous as conversions (or maybe promotions) from int to both unsigned int and long are ranked the same.

Either pick one signedness, or write two overload sets for each signedness if you're using constructor overloads that use unsigned types (and you care about that).

share|improve this answer
    
That's right, you cannot call foo(0), but if you use qualified numeric literal, you will be able to avoid ambiguity. foo(0u); foo(0l); –  Greg May 14 '12 at 6:55
    
@Greg If you look at the constructors, no literal is involved. 0 was picked as a value of type int, so 0l misses the point. –  Luc Danton May 14 '12 at 6:57

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