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Populating a request object for a web-service, I need to dynamically add items to some arrays.

I hoped to simplify it by implementing an extension method:

public static class ArrayExtensions<T> where T : class
{
    public static T[] Extend<T>(T[] originalArray, T addItem)
    {
        if (addItem == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("addItem");
        }
        var arr = new[] { addItem };
        if (originalArray == null)
        {
            return arr;
        }
        return originalArray.Concat(arr).ToArray();
    }
}

So that this old code:

if (foo.bazArr == null)
{
    foo.bazArr  = new[] { baz };
}
else
{
    foo.bazArr = new[] { baz }.Concat(foo.bazArr).ToArray(); // (i know this inserts the new item at the beginning, but that's irrelevant, order doesn't matter)
}

could be rewritten as:

foo.bazArr = foo.bazArr.Extend(baz); // won't compile

The error is: 'System.Array' does not contain a definition for 'Extend' and no extension method 'Extend' accepting a first argument of type 'System.Array' could be found (are you missing a using directive or an assembly reference?)

Whereas calling the extension method directly like so:

foo.bazArr = ArrayExtensions<someService.bazType>.Extend(foo.bazArr, baz);

compiles fine.

Why is that so? Why can't the compiler infer the type on its own here, if the array is strongly-typed?


EDIT - correct code below:

public static class ArrayExtensions
{
    public static T[] Extend<T>(this T[] originalArray, T addItem) where T : class
    {
        if (addItem == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("addItem");
        }
        var arr = new[] { addItem };
        if (originalArray == null)
        {
            return arr;
        }
        return originalArray.Concat(arr).ToArray(); // although Concat is not recommended for performance reasons, see the accepted answer
    }
}
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2  
try adding a this before T[] originalArray in your method param –  mshsayem May 14 '12 at 6:53
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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Missing this:

public static T[] Extend<T>(this T[] originalArray, T addItem)

Without the this it is not an extension method.

Additional note: extending an array one item at a time is expensive. A List<T> would be far preferable. Check to see if your web-service tools offer lists as an option.

Even with arrays, using Enumerable.Concat is probably overkill here; I would simply measure the two arrays, allocate a new one, and use the CopyTo method of each to write into place in the new array.

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This is embarassing :)) gosh, I really need that first coffee today. Thank you. –  Konrad Morawski May 14 '12 at 6:55
    
1. By the way, the compiler also forced me to move the generic constraint from the class level to the method level. But it works fine when I did that. 2. A List<T> would be far preferable. Check to see if your web-service tools offer lists as an option. - I imagine. But we've got other apps using this webservice and changing the type surely would break them here, no? I only expect a few items in the collection anyway (they represent product sizes, so it's never thousands of them). –  Konrad Morawski May 14 '12 at 7:00
1  
@Morawski the list vs array is a client-side thing; doesn't impact the web-service or the serialization at all. –  Marc Gravell May 14 '12 at 7:01
    
Oh I see. Didn't know that, I'll look into it. –  Konrad Morawski May 14 '12 at 7:03
    
Accepted as the first and most comprehensive answer. –  Konrad Morawski May 14 '12 at 7:06
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use this in defining extension method

public static T[] Extend<T>(this T[] originalArray, T addItem)
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Thanks! (8 more to go) –  Konrad Morawski May 14 '12 at 6:55
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you have missed the "this" keyword

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! (8 more to go) –  Konrad Morawski May 14 '12 at 6:58
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