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I'm relatively new to the PHP OO concept. I've been messing around with the following,

<?php

require('class_database.php');
require('class_session.php');

class something {  

  $database = NULL;
  $session = NULL;

  function __construct() {
    $this->database = new database();
    $this->session = new session();
  }

  function login() {
    $this->session->doLogin();
  }
}
?>

in another script

$something = new something();
$something->login();

In this example, $database has a constructor which creates a protected variable containing a MySQLi connection. It also has a function called query().

If $session needed to run $database->query, how can I go about it? Creating a new database class would be highly wasteful but I can't seem to access $database from $session.

Have I created a big hassle for myself I should have avoided? I'm wanting session to provide login verification which would need to access the database to check credentials.

Thanks for any help

share|improve this question
2  
The code you've posted doesn't make sense – are you sure you didn't mean to put it all in a constructor for something? You can't make imperative statements outside a function body in a class; only declarations. –  Will Vousden May 14 '12 at 7:38
    
Oh you're right. I tried to simplify my original problem but this doesn't quite work. I'll edit it. –  Lokicat May 14 '12 at 7:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

How about making the constructor of the session class take a parameter that is the instance of database?

$database = new database();
$session = new session($database);

Then in the session constructor, set it to a property of the object and make use of it:

private var $_database;

public function __construct($database) {
   $this->_database = $database;
}

public function doSomething() {
    $this->_database->query();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hi, looks like this is the ticket! I made $database public and passed it as a reference to session. Worked like a charm. Cheers! –  Lokicat May 14 '12 at 7:55
1  
@Lokicat: FWIW, this is an example of dependency injection, mentioned in the other answer. It's an important design principle in OOP that you should familiarize yourself with! –  Will Vousden May 14 '12 at 8:00
    
I've done it in other languages but I led myself to a strange place in PHP. Soon as it was mentioned, fireworks went off and everything made sense :) –  Lokicat May 14 '12 at 8:06
    
As an aside, you would probably want to call the classes Database and Session as it's common to capitalise class names in PHP. –  howard10 Aug 14 at 11:06

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dependency_Injection and http://martinfowler.com/articles/injection.html for more info about this topic.

<?php
class something {  
  require('class_database.php');
  require('class_session.php');

  $database = new database();
  // dependency injection either here in constructor or in the function that needs it below
  $session = new session($database);


  $session->doSomething(); //This method wants to access $database->query();
}
?>

UPDATE (OP changed code in question)

<?php

require('class_database.php');
require('class_session.php');

class something
{  
  protected $session = NULL;

  public function __construct($session) {
    $this->session = $session;
  }

  public function login() {
    $this->session->doLogin();
  }
}

$database = new database();
$session = new session($database);
$something = new something($session);
$something->login();
?>
share|improve this answer
    
You are passing $session into the constructor of something, but you're doing nothing with it? I would expect $this->session = $session in the constructor... –  kasimir May 15 '12 at 9:18
    
@kasimir copy/paste error. fixed. Thanks! –  PeeHaa May 15 '12 at 9:22

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