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I wonder if it's possible to keep methods for a Python class in a different file from the class definition, something like this:

main_module.py:

class Instrument(Object):
    # Some import statement?
    def __init__(self):
        self.flag = True
    def direct_method(self,arg1):
        self.external_method(arg1, arg2)

to_import_from.py:

def external_method(self, arg1, arg2):
    if self.flag:
        #doing something
#...many more methods

In my case, to_import_from.py is machine-generated, and contains many methods. I would rather not copy-paste these into main_module.py or import them one by one, but have them all recognized as methods of the Instrument class, just as if they had been defined there:

>>> instr = Instrument()
>>> instr.direct_method(arg1)
>>> instr.external_method(arg1, arg2)

Thanks!

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Do you control the generation of to_import_from.py, or do you have to use it "as is"? –  itsadok Jun 29 '09 at 13:14
    
Yes, I can control it a bit by tweaking the code of ctypeslib. –  Martin Gustafsson Jun 29 '09 at 15:49
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8 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I don't think what you want is directly possible in Python.

You could, however, try one of the following.

  1. When generating to_import_from.py, add the non-generated stuff there too. This way, all methods are in the same class definition.
  2. Have to_import_from.py contain a base class definition which the the Instrument class inherits.

In other words, in to_import_from.py:

class InstrumentBase(object):
    def external_method(self, arg1, arg2):
        if self.flag:
            ...

and then in main_module.py:

import to_import_from

class Instrument(to_import_from.InstrumentBase):
    def __init__(self):
        ...
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2  
Option 2 looks like just the solution I need. Many thanks! –  Martin Gustafsson Jun 29 '09 at 15:51
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It's easier than you think:

class Instrument(Object):
    def __init__(self):
        self.flag = True
    def direct_method(self,arg1):
        self.external_method(arg1, arg2)

import to_import_from

Instrument.external_method = to_import_from.external_method

Done!

Although having the machine generated code generate a class definition and subclassing from it would be a neater solution.

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you can do this with the __getattr__ method

external.py

def external_function(arg):
    print("external", arg)

main.py:

import external

class Instrument(object):
    def __getattr__(self, name):
        if hasattr(external, name):
            return getattr(external, name)
        else:
            return Object.__getattr__(self, name)

    def direct_method(self, arg):
        print("internal", arg)


i = Instrument() 
i.direct_method("foo")
i.external_function("foo")
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I'm sorry that this is kind of a "You shouldn't be putting nails in the wall" answer, but you're missing the point of python class definitions. You should rather put the class with all its methods in its own python file, and in your main_module.py do

from instrument import Instrument

If you plan on using the methods for several classes, you should consider subclassing. In your case, the machine generated file could contain the base class that Instrument inherits from.

Finally, give your class a good docstring that explains the API to its user, so there is no need for a "header file" used as an overview of your class.

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What you're doing is extending a base class with some "machine-generated" code.

Choice 1. Extend a base class with machine-generated code.

machine_generated.py

# Start of boilerplate #
import main_module
class Instrument_Implementation( main_module.Instrument_Abstraction ):
    def direct_method(self,arg1): 
       # End of boilerplate #
       ...the real code...

Your application can then import machine_generated and use machine_generated.Instrument_Implementation.

Choice 2. Simply use first-class functions.

machine_generated.py

def external_method(self, arg1, arg2):
    ...the real code...

main_module.py

import machine_generated

class Instrument( object ):
    def direct_method(self,arg1): 
        return machine_generator.external_method( arg1, ... )

Your application can import main_module and use main_module.Instrument.

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People seem to be overthinking this. Methods are just function valued local variables in class construction scope. So the following works fine:

class Instrument(Object):
    # load external methods
    from to_import_from import *

    def __init__(self):
        self.flag = True
    def direct_method(self,arg1):
        self.external_method(arg1, arg2)
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SyntaxWarning: import * only allowed at module level –  Martin Gustafsson Jun 30 '09 at 11:21
2  
+1 Even if * is wrong it's a great, clean tip. –  thethinman Apr 16 '10 at 21:21
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Here's my try. I think a nicer approach could be made with metaclasses...

to_import_from.py :

def external_method(self, arg1, arg2):
    if self.flag:
        print "flag is set"
    else :
        print "flag is not set"

instrument.py :

import imp
import os
import inspect
import new

import pdb

class MethodImporter(object) :
    def __init__(self, path_to_module) :
        self.load_module(path_to_module)

    def load_module(self, path_to_module) :
        name = os.path.basename(path_to_module)
        module_file = file(path_to_module,"r")
        self.module = imp.load_module(name, module_file , path_to_module, ('','r',imp.PY_SOURCE))
        print "Module %s imported" % self.module
        for method_name, method_object in inspect.getmembers(self.module, inspect.isfunction) :
            print "adding method %s to %s" % (method_name, self)
            setattr(self, method_name, new.instancemethod(method_object, self, self.__class__))


class Instrument(MethodImporter):
    def __init__(self):
        super(Instrument,self).__init__("./to_import_from.py")
        self.flag = True
    def direct_method(self,arg1):
        self.external_method(arg1, arg2)

when you run this code

arg1, arg2 = 1, 2
instr = Instrument()
instr.direct_method(arg1)
instr.external_method(arg1, arg2)

here's the output :

Module <module 'to_import_from.py' from './to_import_from.pyc'> imported
adding method external_method to <__main__.Instrument object at 0x2ddeb0>
flag is set
flag is set
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Technically, yes this is possible, but solving it this way is not really idiomatic python, and there are likely better solutions. Here's an example of how to do so:

import to_import_from

class Instrument(object):
    locals().update(dict((k,v) for (k,v) in 
                    to_import_from.__dict__.iteritems() if callable(v)))

    def __init__(self):
        self.flag = True
    def direct_method(self,arg1):
        self.external_method(arg1, arg2)

That will import all callable functions defined in to_import_from as methods of the Instrument class, as well as adding some more methods. Note: if you also want to copy global variables as instance variables, you'll need to refine the check. Also note that it adds all callable objects it finds in to_import_from's namespace, including imports from other modules (ie from module import some_func style imports)

However, this isn't a terribly nice way to do it. Better would be to instead tweak your code generation to produce a class, and have your class inherit from it. This avoids the unneccessary copying of methods into Instrument's namespace, and instead uses normal inheritcance. ie:

class Instrument(to_import_from.BaseClass):
    # Add new methods here.
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